Art History

Articles

Search databases to find articles in peer-reviewed journals, magazines, newspapers, reference sources, and other publications. Access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Academic Search Complete
Articles from peer-reviewed journals, newspapers, and magazines useful for many subjects. A great place to get started with research.

Bibliography of the History of Art
Access is provided by the Getty.

Humanities Source
A full-text database covering literary, scholarly and creative thought. It provides full text, indexing and abstracts for the most noted scholarly sources in the humanities.

JSTOR
A collection of scholarly journals. Try searching Art & Art History.

Search Everything
Use the "Search Everything" tab on the Library’s homepage to search across all library collections, including books, ebooks, journals, magazines, newspapers, and other publications.

Books

Textbooks
Search for Art textbooks by course number via this list of textbooks on reserve. Also search by title in the Library's catalog. Request textbooks at the Circulation Desk and use for up to two hours in the Library. Call numbers are designated by course number, e.g. EGL 101.

Print Books
Search for books in the Library's catalog. Also find print materials via the "Books and eBooks" tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc.

  • Circulating Books: Located on the Lower Level. Check out up to 10 books for 16 weeks at a time with your FSC ID
  • Reference Books: Located on the First Floor. Must be used within the Library. Includes encyclopedias, handbooks, dictionaries, test prep books, etc.

eBooks
Search for ebooks via the "Books and eBooks" tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc. View materials as a PDF and access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Websites

Metropolitan Museum of Art
View their collection or explore their website.

The Brooklyn Museum of Art
The Brooklyn Museum of Art has released some images under Creative Commons -- where it holds the rights -- and made that information available in their search. Check out their copyright policy for details.

The Getty: Resources for Visual Art and Cultural Heritage
Browse their extensive resources or go directly to their art collection.

The National Gallery, London
Search their collection of over 2600 paintings.

Citing Sources in MLA Style

See below for basic guidelines and examples of MLA citation style.

Test your knowledge of MLA format with this quiz.

MLA Quiz

Why Cite?

Why you need to cite sources:

  • Citing sources is the only way to use other people’s work without plagiarizing (i.e. if you are using any resource [journal article, book, website, report, interview, etc.], you NEED to give credit to the original source).
  • The readers of your work need citations to learn more about your ideas and where they came from.
  • Citing sources shows the amount of research you’ve done.
  • Citing sources strengthens your work by lending outside support to your ideas.

In-Text Citations

In-text citations give credit to sources in the body of your paper. Use in-text citations when paraphrasing, directly quoting, or using ideas from sources.

  • MLA citation style uses the author-page method for in-text citations: Author(s)’ last name and the page number(s) from which the quotation or paraphrase is taken must appear in the text.
  • Last names may appear either in the sentence itself or in parentheses following the quotation or paraphrase, but the page number(s) should always appear in the parentheses, not in the text of your sentence.

 

In-Text Citation Examples


Example 1. Writers should ask questions that will result in interesting answers (Zinsser 100). 
Example 2. Zinsser notes that writers should ask questions about interesting experiences in their subjects' lives (100). 
Example 3. Writers should ask their subjects "questions that will elicit answers about what is most interesting or vivid in their lives" (Zinsser 100). 

In-Text Citations vs. Works Cited Page


In text citations are brief, providing only some information about the resource being referenced. These citations must match up to a full citation in the Works Cited page. 
In text citations show readers where to find more information, by directing them to an entry in the Works Cited page. The Works Cited page provides much more information about the resource, so readers will be able to locate it and consult the original source. 

Example 1. The above in-text citations correspond to the following full citation, which would appear in the Works Cited page: 
Zinsser, William. On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction. Harper Collins, 1976. 

Works Cited Page

The Works Cited page lists complete citations which correspond to in-text citations. The word or phrase you use in your in-text citations must be the first thing that appears on the left-hand margin of the corresponding entry in your Works Cited page.

Formatting

    • Separate page labeled “Works Cited,” double-spaced, same margins, etc. as rest of paper.
    • Indent the second and subsequent lines of citations by 0.5 inches to create a hanging indent.

Author Names

    • Alphabetized by the last name of the first author of each work.
    • Authors' names are inverted (last name, first name; middle name/initial).
    • If a work has no known author, use a shortened version of the title.

Capitalization and Punctuation

    • Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc, but do not capitalize articles (the, an), prepositions, or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the title or subtitle, e.g. Gone with the Wind.
    • Use italics (instead of underlining) for titles of larger works (books, magazines) and quotation marks for titles of shorter works (poems, articles).

Works Cited Page Examples

Book
Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Publisher, Publication Date.
Example: Zinsser, William. On Writing Well. The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction. HarperCollins, 1976.

Scholarly Article
Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical, volume number, issue number, Date Month Year,
pages, Database, DOI or URL.
Note: include the URL if there is no DOI
Example: Matsumura, Lindsay Clare, et al. "Classroom Writing Tasks and Students' Analytic Text-Based Writing" Reading
Research Quarterlr, vol. 50, no. 4, Oct.-Dec. 2015, pp. 417-38. Education Full Text (H.W. Wilson), doi:10. 1002/rrq.110.

A Page on a Website / Web document
List as much of the following information as possible (you sometimes have to hunt around to find the information).
Author Last Name, First Name/Organization. ''Title of Page" Name of Website, Date of Publication, URL, Date Accessed.
Example: Rodburg, Maxi ne, and Tutors of the Writing Center at Harvard University. "Developing a Thesis." Harvard University,
1999, writingcenter.fas harvard edu/pages/developing-thesis. Accessed 20 Mar. 2017.

Newspaper Article
Author (s). "Title of Article." Title of Periodical, Day Month Year, pages
Example:  Fani, Anthony "Tips For College Students Searching For Internships" Philadelphia Tribune, 18 Oct. 2016, p. 14.

Videos

Video and audio sources need to be documented using the same basic guidelines for citing print sources in MLA style. Include as much descriptive information as necessary to help readers understand the type and nature of the source you are citing. If the author’s name is the same as the uploader, only cite the author once. If the author is different from the uploader, cite the author’s name before the title.

McGonigal, Jane. “Gaming and Productivity.” YouTube, uploaded by Big Think, 3 July 2012, www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkdzy9bWW3E.



NoodleTools

Access NoodleTools

NoodleTools is a citation manager that can help you generate and format citations correctly.

  • Select the type of resource you are citing (article, book, website, etc.) and NoodleTools will prompt you to enter required information. A citation is then generated in your selected format (MLA).
  • NoodleTools requires an account, so every time you log in your citations will be saved for you.
  • When you are finished entering information, a reference list can be generated for you and exported to MS Word or Google Docs.

Citation Help

For more details and examples of MLA citation style, visit the following websites:

 

Writing & Research Help

Visit the Writing Center, located on the Second Floor of Greenley Hall.

Consult Farmingdale State College’s Handbook on Writing Research Papers.

More research paper guides:

Videos 

 

Database Searching Tutorial on Selecting Keywords

Evaluating Sources Using CRAAP by Hodges University

Citing using MLA by Citrus College


RESEARCH HELP | Have a question? Librarians are available to assist you during all open hours.

Thomas D. Greenley

Greenley Library

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Reference: 934-420-2184
reference@farmingdale.edu

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