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Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DEISJ): Sociology & Anthropology

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DEISJ): Sociology & Anthropology badge

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DEISJ): Sociology & Anthropology

The Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice (DEISJ): Sociology & Anthropology microcredential is especially valuable to students pursuing degrees in helping fields or ones requiring workers regularly interact with people from diverse cultural, economic, and social locations, including health and human services, human resources, hospitality and other industries. This credential is also of enormous value to any student who seeks a deeper understanding of injustice in the world and how, as global citizens, we can change the world for the better. The microcredential is comprised of nine credits: one introductory DEISJ-designated course and two upper-division DEISJ-designated courses. Students will also be required to attend or participate in one DEISJ co-curricular activity and write a reflection paper incorporating theories and ideas learned in their coursework to analyze their experience of the event.

Admission requirements for application:

Requirements to earn the microcredential:

  • To achieve the DEISJ: Sociology & Anthropology microcredential, students will complete 3 required D-designated courses with a grade of C or better.
  • One course must be a D-designated course from the following introductory courses: ANT 110, SOC 122
  • Students must also take an additional six credits (2 courses) from the following D-designated sections: ANT 130, ANT 211, SOC 150, SOC 200, SOC 228, SOC 229, SOC 231, SOC 240, SOC 253, SOC 263, SOC 283, SOC 308, SOC 325, SOC 326, SOC 329, SOC 361
  • Students must also attend one DEISJ co-curricular activity and write a reflection paper incorporating theories and ideas learned from their coursework on the event.

Stackable to:

Liberal Arts and Sciences, A.A.

Time to complete:

3-4 semesters

Cost to attend:

Standard tuition rates apply. For tuition and student consumer information, please click here.

Contact information:

Dr. Natalie Ingraham

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology

ingrahn@farmingdale.edu

934-420-2669

 

Dr. Shan Siddiqui

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology

siddiqs@farmingdale.edu

934-420-5379

Contact Information

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT

Memorial Hall, Room 124
934-420-2669
admissions@farmingdale.edu

Students select courses listed below:

Required Introductory Coursework (Choose one) (1 course, 3 credits)
ANT 110: Sociocultural Anthropology *D 3 credits
SOC 122: Introduction to Sociology *D 3 credits
Required Upper Division Coursework (Choose two) (2 course, 6 credits)
ANT 130: Indigenous Peoples of North America *D 3 credits
ANT 211: Caribbean Cultures *D 3 credits
SOC 150: Introduction to Africana Studies *D 3 credits
SOC 200: Introduction to Women’s Studies *D 3 credits
SOC 228: Society and Health *D 3 credits
SOC 229: Race and Ethnic Relations *D 3 credits
SOC 231: Multiculturalism *D 3 credits
SOC 240: Gender and Social Change *D 3 credits
SOC 253: Black Popular Cultures *D 3 credits
SOC 263: Immigration Past and Present *D 3 credits
SOC 282: Introduction to LGBTQ+ Studies *D 3 credits
SOC 283: Sex, Gender and Sexuality *D 3 credits
SOC 308: Black Political and Social Thought *D 3 credits
SOC 325: Social Inequality *D 3 credits
SOC 326: Visual Sociology *D 3 credits
SOC 329: Social Movements *D 3 credits
SOC 361: Gender Theory *D 3 credits

ANT 110 Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural Anthropology is concerned with examination of the social and cultural similarities and differences in the world's human populations. Subsistence patterns, social organization, economic structures, political systems, religion and creative behavior are the major areas we cover. By examining examples ranging from small gathering and hunting groups to large modern day communities, this course provides a broad perspective of the sociocultural realities of our world. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for ANT 110 and ANT 110*D ANT 110*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the field of sociology. In addition to learning about the central concepts and major theoretical sociological perspectives, students study human behavior in groups, the organization of social life, the impact of social institutions on individuals, and the process of sociological research. Great emphasis is also placed upon development of students’ “sociological imagination” – specifically, the ability to understand the ways that our individual lives are shaped by larger social forces and institutions. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 122 and 122W or SOC 122*D SOC 122W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. SOC 122*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

ANT 130 Indigenous Peoples of North America

This course provides a comprehensive history of the human groups who populated North America before, during and after settler-colonialists brought the culture, politics and economics of Europe to North America. Students will be introduced to the anthropological literature concerned with the study and understanding of Indigenous cultures and societies. Students will learn about the dynamic Indigenous heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed on through the generations. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for ANT 130 and ANT 130*D ANT 130*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

ANT 211 Caribbean Cultures

This course covers: pre-European cultures in the Caribbean, the post-Columbus plantation system, contemporary economics and politics, community structure, religion, marriage and family, ethnic diversity, immigration and the arts. An in-depth study of these topics will provide knowledge, understanding and appreciation of this region while offering insights into the development of communities in the U.S. with Caribbean heritage. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for ANT 211 and ANT 211*D ANT 211*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

SOC 150 Introduction to Africana Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Africana Studies. The course centers African, African American, and Caribbean history, culture, and politics. Students will learn about the political, social, and economic organization of nations, communities, and people from Africa and the African Diaspora. Students will explore key dimensions of Black life throughout the diaspora and learn how African people in the Americas have shaped and contributed to a wide-range of social institutions and challenged public debates regarding citizenship, race, nationality, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 150 and SOC 150*D SOC 150*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

SOC 200 Introduction to Women's Studies

An interdisciplinary approach that will draw on literature, history, sociology, as well as science and technology, the course will introduce students to issues in gender that cross traditional disciplines. Cultural assumptions about gender will be examined, and students will be encouraged to consider new ways of looking at knowledge in light of new understanding about the ways in which gender constructs beliefs and influences life's realities. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 200 and SOC 200*D SOC 200*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): Introductory social science course and EGL 102.

SOC 228 Society and Health

This course examines the meanings and experiences of health and illness and the ways in which social factors like age, gender, class and ethnicity affect health. We explore the historical development of health professions, including alternative health professions. Significant time is also devoted to understanding the workings of the contemporary American healthcare system. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 228 and SOC 228*D SOC 228*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

SOC 229 Race and Ethnic Relations

This course provides a sociological perspective on race and ethnic relations. Race and ethnicity are both socially constructed identities that change across time and space. Language, culture, wealth, politics, religion, transnational interactions, and gender all impact the way that racial and ethnic identities are constructed and resisted. In this class we will address how different groups (including African Americans, Caribbean Americans, Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Muslim Americans) that experience racism and discrimination, are also actively developing their communities and adding to the diversity in American society. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 229 and SOC 229*D. SOC 229*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or ANT 100

SOC 231 Multiculturalism

This course explores the wide variety of cultures that currently exist in the United States. In addition to different racial and ethnic cultures, we also consider class cultures, religious cultures and LGBTQ cultures. Significant time is devoted to examining the values, norms and everyday life of different cultures as well as the ways that different cultures (and the people from those cultures) interact. Multicultural social policy issues and media representations of different cultures are also analyzed. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 231 and SOC 231*D SOC 231*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 240 Gender and Social Change

This course studies men’s and women’s changing roles, relationships, and participation in the labor force. A substantial section of the course is dedicated to understanding the history responsible for contemporary women’s and men’s social, economic, political and legal statuses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for ANT 240. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 240 and SOC 240*D SOC 240*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 253 Black Popular Cultures

This course examines the development of Black popular cultures in the 20th and 21st century in the United States. Through close readings of text, music, and film, students will discuss the historical roots, current manifestations, and diversity within Black cultures. Topics may include but are not limited to the Black church, the Harlem Renaissance, Hip-Hop, the commodification of Black culture, sororities and fraternities, stepping, drag balls/ballroom, and sexual subcultures. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 253 and SOC 253*D SOC 253*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 and Any Sociology Course

SOC 282 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender, and Queer+ (LGBTQ+) Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer+ (LGBTQ+) Studies. We will examine major concepts, theories, and political issues surrounding LGBTQ experience. We will analyze gender identity and human sexuality as social, cultural, and historical constructions. In addition, LGBTQ+ identities have profound implications in economic, cultural, social, and political spheres of life. We will pay acute attention to LGBTQ+ political struggles and their relationships to economy, family, religion, education, law, and medicine. Drawing from fields such as: Sociology, Anthropology, History, English, and Psychology, we will examine the status, experiences, and discrimination against members of the LGBTQ+ and how race, ethnicity, class, and ability also shape these experiences. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 282 and 282W or SOC 282*D SOC 282W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. SOC 282*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite (s): One Social Science and EGL 102

SOC 283 Sex, Gender and Sexuality

This course introduces students to the study of sex, gender, and sexuality from a sociological perspective. It examines how these categories are socially and culturally constructed and how they affect our lives and shape our social world. Students read a wide range of classic sociological texts that examines the differences between sex and gender and explores human sexuality. A primary topic of discussion is gender socialization or how people learn society’s gender norms from family, media, peers, educational institutions, and the workplace. Students will be introduced to cutting-edge research and case studies. Topics include: intersexuality, men’s studies, feminist theory, transgendered individuals, sex work, and queer theory. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 283 and SOC 283*D SOC 283*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 308 Black Political and Social Thought

In this course, students will learn a wide-range of Black political theories from the 19th to 21st centuries. Students will be introduced to the ideas of prominent Black leaders who crafted ideas that helped people understand better the origins of racial discrimination and also provided concrete strategies for remedying institutionalized racism. Using an intersectional lens, students will also be introduced to how overlapping systems of oppression such as class, gender, and sexuality shape Black political and social thought. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 308 and SOC 308*D SOC 308*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 1XX or HIS 1XX (before 1865) or HIS 1XX (after 1865) or POL 105 and EGL 102

SOC 325 Social Inequality

This course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of social stratification. We explore the different theoretical perspectives on inequality, global inequalities, the extent of inequality in America, and the issues of status and mobility. In addition to examining the different class cultures in the United States, we investigate the profound effects of education, class, gender, and race on individual “life chances” (i.e. the ability to achieve power, wealth, status, etc.). NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 325 and SOC 325*D SOC 325*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level Sociology course.

SOC 326 Visual Sociology

Visual Sociology uses cultural imagery to examine and analyze society. This course will explore the use of visual methods to study human behavior. Students will explore how meaning is created and transmitted visually and how visual media can be used to communicate sociological understandings to public audiences. Specifically, students will learn how to conduct visual ethnography and how to use sociological concepts and theories to analyze data. In this experiential learning course, students will use photography as a tool to conduct fieldwork—gathering data about a social justice issue that they have chosen, and presenting those findings in a poster presentation. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 326 and SOC 326*D SOC 326*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level Sociology course.

SOC 329 Social Movements

In this course, students will learn to critically analyze processes of change in society while developing an analytical mind and improving their writing skills. Social movements are collective attempts to change the way people live their lives, how governments govern, and how economic systems produce and distribute goods. We live in a social movement society. Though we are not always aware of the level of activism going on around us, the number and different types of organizations working to create some type of social change is larger than ever before. Globalization and communications technologies have broken down barriers to worldwide participation in movements for change. Understanding how the world is influenced by individuals working together for change is of vital importance. This class focuses on theoretical domains in the sociological study of social movements and general social processes rather than on specific movements. Substantive work on specific movements is used to explain issues such as mobilization, tactics, and ideology, among other factors. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 329 and SOC 329*D SOC 329*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level or higher sociology course

SOC 361 Gender Theory

Gender theory examines how the categories of sex and gender influence our ways of living and thinking. We will examine the prevalence of gender inequality in society and how it might be eradicated. We will also emphasize the ways in which socio-economic position, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, geography, and/or ability interact with gender to shape our experiences. Students will gain better insight into how gender impacts their lives at work, at home, and in public. Students will learn how to apply gender theories to their own lives, identities, and social worlds. NOTE: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 361 and 361W or SOC 361*D SOC 361W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. SOC 361*D can be used to fulfill the Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or 282 or 283 or PSY 230 or 307 and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher.

Last Modified 5/21/24