Sociology Minor

The Sociology and Anthropology Department offers an undergraduate minor in Sociology to all baccalaureate degree students at Farmingdale State College. Employing the concepts, theories and research methodologies of sociology, an academic minor in sociology can provide students with useful tools for the workplace and enhance their understanding of themselves and society. Students who would like to minor in Sociology should apply through the Sociology and Anthropology Department. The Sociology minor consists of 18 credits. In order to graduate with the Sociology minor, students must also have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 in their qualified sociology courses.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate sociological understandings of phenomena, for example, how individual biographies are shaped by social structures, social institutions, cultural practices, and multiple axes of difference and/or inequality.
  • Students will demonstrate familiarity with major sociological concepts and vocabulary
  • Students will understand and apply several of the major classical and/or contemporary perspectives in social theory.
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of some of the key substantive areas within the field of sociology.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of several of the major social science research methodologies.
  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking by analyzing and evaluating social, political, and/or cultural arguments.

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Sociology and Anthropology | Dr. Evan Cooper, Chair | sociologyandanthropology@farmingdale.edu | 934-420-2669

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Core: (9 credits)
SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

OR

SOC 223 Social Issues and Institutions 3
SOC 360 Sociological Theory 3
SOC 366 Sociological Research Methods 3

Any 200 level or higher Sociology Electives (choose from the following courses):
(9 credits)

RAM 303 Research Experience 3
SOC 200 Introduction to Women's Studies 3
SOC 201 Sociology of Education 3
SOC 220 Sociology of Aging 3
SOC 224 Urban Sociology 3
SOC 225 Sociology of the Family 3
SOC 228 Society and Health 3
SOC 229 Race and Ethnic Relations 3
SOC 231 Multiculturalism 3
SOC 235 Mass Media and Popular Culture 3
SOC 236 Sociology of the Military 3
SOC 237 The Sociology of Popular Music 3
SOC 238 Youth Culture 3
SOC 240 Women, Men and Social Change 3
SOC 245 Technology, Society and Social Change 3
SOC 263 Immigration Past and Present 3
SOC 270-279 Topics in Sociology 3
SOC 282 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Studies 3
SOC 283 Sex, Gender and Sexuality 3
SOC 303 Sociology of Work and Occupation 3
SOC 304 Sociology of Leadership 3
SOC 305 Culture and Technology 3
SOC 309 Sport in Society 3
SOC 311 African American Leadership 3
SOC 325 Social Inequality 3
SOC 326 Visual Sociology 3
SOC 329 Social Movements 3
SOC 330-339 Seminar in Sociology 3
SOC 342 Deviance, Crime, Sex and Drugs 3
SOC 350 Global Social Change 3
SOC 351 Global Health Systems 3
SOC 361 Gender Theory 3
SOC 407 Field Research in Sociology 3
SOC 480-482 Research Internship I 3
SOC 485-487 Research Internship II 3

SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the field of sociology. In addition to learning about the central concepts and major theoretical sociological perspectives, students study human behavior in groups, the organization of social life, the impact of social institutions on individuals, and the process of sociological research. Great emphasis is also placed upon development of students’ “sociological imagination” – specifically, the ability to understand the ways that our individual lives are shaped by larger social forces and institutions. Note: Students who take SOC 122 may not receive credit for SOC 122W.

SOC 223 Social Issues and Institutions

Focusing primarily on the United States, we discuss complex social issues such as crime, alcoholism, drug use, environmental issues, and poverty. In doing so, we examine major social institutions such as the family, the workplace, the mass media, the criminal legal system, and the healthcare system.

SOC 360 Sociological Theory

This course examines sociological theory, from its beginnings in the 19th century through its historical development into the 21st century. The theories of classical sociologists such as Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber will be covered. This comprehensive course will also introduce students to contemporary theory such as feminist theory, gender theory, critical theory, and post-structuralism. This course provides students with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of the discipline of sociology and examines how theory can be applied to better understand the social world. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 Level Sociology course and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher.

SOC 366 Sociological Research Methods

In this course, we develop an understanding of the different types of research methods used by sociologists (and other social scientists) to study the social world. The class begins with a discussion of the fundamental concepts of social science research and the ethical issues involved. Students will learn how to conduct basic qualitative and quantitative research - the ability to formulate research questions, methods of research design, strategies for collecting information and data, as well as the ability to analyze and present statistical data. Great emphasis is placed on students doing research projects in and outside of class. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 Level Sociology course.

RAM 303 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals.

SOC 200 Introduction to Women's Studies

An interdisciplinary approach that will draw on literature, history, sociology, as well as science and technology, the course will introduce students to issues in gender that cross traditional disciplines. Cultural assumptions about gender will be examined, and students will be encouraged to consider new ways of looking at knowledge in light of new understanding about the ways in which gender constructs beliefs and influences life's realities. Prerequisite(s): Introductory social science course and EGL 102.

SOC 201 Sociology of Education

The course analyzes the American educational system. We examine the ways that schools (including institutions of higher education) serve as agents of socialization, foster social mobility, and transmit knowledge and culture. We also study the school as a bureaucratic organization. Students are encouraged to think critically about their own educational experiences. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 220 Sociology of Aging

The course examines the social phenomenon of aging. We look at different theories of aging and discuss the ways that different cultures approach the process of aging. Similarly, we consider class as well as racial/ethnic differences in the social meanings and consequences of aging. Lastly, we devote considerable time to looking at various political, economic, and social issues associated with aging and the elderly.

SOC 224 Urban Sociology

This course examines the development, processes and problems of urban life, emphasizing urban social processes in contemporary American cities. Although emphasis will be given to contemporary America, historical and cross-cultural comparisons will also be presented. Major sociological theories used to study and explain the metropolis will be presented. Along with relevant research findings; the importance of field work in the urban sociological research is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 225 Sociology of the Family

This course examines the family in the United States as a core social institution. We consider theoretical, historical, and cross-cultural aspects of such topics as mate selection, marital dynamics, the changing roles of men and women, parenting and child-rearing, divorce, aging, conflict and violence, alternative lifestyles and family policy. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 228 Society and Health

This course examines the meanings and experiences of health and illness and the ways in which social factors like age, gender, class and ethnicity affect health. We explore the historical development of health professions, including alternative health professions. Significant time is also devoted to understanding the workings of the contemporary American healthcare system.

SOC 229 Race and Ethnic Relations

This course provides a sociological perspective on race and ethnic relations. Such a perspective suggests that racial and ethnic categories are social constructs that result from historical struggles over economic resources, political access, and cultural identity. Furthermore such a perspective demonstrates that racism and ethnic prejudice are not simply the properties of individuals. This class will examine the intersection of racial and ethnic conflict with a variety of other ideas and structures in society in order to reveal the ways in which race continues to matter. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or ANT 100

SOC 231 Multiculturalism

This course explores the wide variety of cultures that currently exist in the United States. In addition to different racial and ethnic cultures, we also consider class cultures, religious cultures and LGBTQ cultures. Significant time is devoted to examining the values, norms and everyday life of different cultures as well as the ways that different cultures (and the people from those cultures) interact. Multicultural social policy issues and media representations of different cultures are also analyzed. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 235 Mass Media and Popular Culture

This course examines popular culture and mass media in America. Emphasis is on the current state of popular culture and mass media, although historical presentations may be included. Major sociological theories used to study and explain popular culture and mass media will be presented along with relevant research findings. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 236 Sociology of the Military

This course examines the institution of the military from a sociological perspective. Topics may include, but are not limited to the specific structure of military organizations, the norms of military life, family life in the military, as well as stratification and diversity in the military. Particular attention is devoted to changes in the military over time as well as the future of the American military. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 237 The Sociology of Popular Music

This course will examine American popular music genres including but limited to rock and hip-hop, from a sociological perspective. Specific topics to be examined may include: the role of the music industry and recording companies, ideologies, globalization of American music, intertextuality, music consumption patterns and the influence of new technologies, moral panics, theories of popular music culture, social change, and the social class, and gender implications of popular music. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 238 Youth Culture

This course traces the growth of a distinctive youth culture in American life and imagination since World War II. Topics discussed may include juvenile delinquency, teen sexuality, teen poverty and homelessness, the American high school and college life. Particular attention is also devoted to the ways that films, as well as other mass media forms such as popular music and television shows, represent the lives of American youth.

SOC 240 Women, Men and Social Change

This course studies men’s and women’s changing roles, relationships, and participation in the labor force. A substantial section of the course is dedicated to understanding the history responsible for contemporary women’s and men’s social, economic, political and legal statuses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for ANT 240. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 245 Technology, Society and Social Change

This course explores the ways in which science, technology, and society create social change. The focus is on the varying benefits, costs, and consequences of these changes across historical eras and cultures. This course carries a hands-on computer component as a requirement. Prerequisite(s): One course in social science

SOC 263 Immigration Past and Present

Immigration has been one of the most important forces in American society. This course will examine how successive waves of immigrants and newcomers most arriving voluntarily others as slaves and indentured workers have created and recreated American society in their relations with people already here and with each other. The course will present immigration as a process, and examine international migration patterns, changing law, demand for immigrant labor, social networks of family and friends, nativist resistance, the relevant theoretical perspectives, and the experiences of specific groups. We focus on the different periods of immigration, particularly the great migrations of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the post-1965 wave of immigrants from the Caribbean, Asia, Mexico and Latin America. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 270 Topics in Sociology

Courses that range from 270-279 are special topics courses. These courses explore specialized sociological topics of interest and vary from semester to semester. Students may take multiple special topics courses. Please check with the department chairperson and the current course listing for further details. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 282 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Studies. We will examine major concepts, theories, and political issues surrounding LGBT experience. We will analyze gender identity and human sexuality as social, cultural, and historical constructions. In addition, LGBT identity has profound implications in economic, cultural, social, and political spheres of life. We will pay acute attention to LGBT political struggles and their relationships to economy, family, religion, education, law, and medicine. Drawing from fields such as: Sociology, Anthropology, History, English, and Psychology, we will examine the status, experiences, and discrimination against members of the LGBT and the ways these experiences are impacted by race, ethnicity, class, and ability. Prerequisite (s): One Social Science and EGL 102

SOC 283 Sex, Gender and Sexuality

This course introduces students to the study of sex, gender, and sexuality from a sociological perspective. It examines how these categories are socially and culturally constructed and how they affect our lives and shape our social world. Students read a wide range of classic sociological texts that examines the differences between sex and gender and explores human sexuality. A primary topic of discussion is gender socialization or how people learn society’s gender norms from family, media, peers, educational institutions, and the workplace. Students will be introduced to cutting-edge research and case studies. Topics include: intersexuality, men’s studies, feminist theory, transgendered individuals, sex work, and queer theory. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122

SOC 303 Sociology of Work and Occupation

This course will focus on the various dimensions of work and the social experience of making a living in the United States and other societies - past, present and future. We consider the large-scale developments related to a rapidly changing global economy, and the implications of these changes for individual workers. Topics discussed include the impact of technological innovations, changing occupational roles and subcultures, the development of the professions and professional ethics, gender roles and work roles, unemployment and underemployment, and the relationship between work and family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102

SOC 304 Sociology of Leadership

What is leadership? Why is it important? What are its conditions? This course will explore the nature of leadership in social groups, analyzing both contemporary and historical examples, especially as these relate to the emergence, maintenance, conditions, and impact of leaders and leadership models. In this context, we consider and apply classical and contemporary sociological theory and research to understand the variety of roles within groups, the sources of group conformity and deviance, the distribution of power and authority, and the ways in which groups change over time. We will also consider how larger structures of inequality, for example, in social class, gender, ethnicity, race, age, and sexual orientation, may impact leadership. Prerequisite(s): Any social science course and EGL 101.

SOC 309 Sport in Society

This course analyzes the role of sport in society, especially American society. Particular attention is given to the significance of gender, race, ethnicity, and social class in sports. The course is organized around lectures, film, and discussion. Students are also expected to conduct their own research project. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or SOC 223 and EGL 102.

SOC 311 African American Leadership

This course examines African American political leadership in the United States from the antebellum era through the 21st century. Emphasis is placed on the ideas espoused by a wide range of African American leaders, both male and female, and how these ideas shaped formal organizations, economics, politics, and social relations amongst Americans. Drawing from the sociology of leadership, students will learn and discuss what strategies make some leaders effective and successful. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102

SOC 325 Social Inequality

This course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of social stratification. We explore the different theoretical perspectives on inequality, global inequalities, the extent of inequality in America, and the issues of status and mobility. In addition to examining the different class cultures in the United States, we investigate the profound effects of education, class, gender, and race on individual “life chances” (i.e. the ability to achieve power, wealth, status, etc.). Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level Sociology course.

SOC 326 Visual Sociology

Visual Sociology uses cultural imagery to examine and analyze society. This course will explore the use of visual methods to study human behavior. Students will explore how meaning is created and transmitted visually and how visual media can be used to communicate sociological understandings to public audiences. Specifically, students will learn how to conduct visual ethnography and how to use sociological concepts and theories to analyze data. In this experiential learning course, students will use photography as a tool to conduct fieldwork—gathering data about a social justice issue that they have chosen, and presenting those findings in a poster presentation. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level Sociology course.

SOC 329 Social Movements

In this course, students will learn to critically analyze processes of change in society while developing an analytical mind and improving their writing skills. Social movements are collective attempts to change the way people live their lives, how governments govern, and how economic systems produce and distribute goods. We live in a social movement society. Though we are not always aware of the level of activism going on around us, the number and different types of organizations working to create some type of social change is larger than ever before. Globalization and communications technologies have broken down barriers to worldwide participation in movements for change. Understanding how the world is influenced by individuals working together for change is of vital importance. This class focuses on theoretical domains in the sociological study of social movements and general social processes rather than on specific movements. Substantive work on specific movements is used to explain issues such as mobilization, tactics, and ideology, among other factors. Prerequisite(s): Any 200 level or higher sociology course

SOC 330 Seminar in Sociology

Courses that range from 330-339 are special topics courses. Each semester when the course is offered, a topic of interest will be selected by the department for study in seminar. Please check with the department chairperson and the current course listing for further details. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102.

SOC 342 Deviance: Crime, Sex and Drugs

This course explores classic and contemporary definitions and theories of deviance. Special attention is placed on the social functions that deviance serves in society, and the inequalities that emerge in the criminal legal system. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or SOC 223 and EGL 102.

SOC 350 Global Social Change

This course examines global social change from a sociological perspective. Specifically, the course focuses on the process of globalization, particularly on the challenges international development poses for developing nations. Specific topics may include global income inequality, global poverty, anti-globalization activism, transnational corporations (e.g. Walmart), and the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. World Trade Organization). Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102.

SOC 351 Global Health Systems

This course examines and compares healthcare systems from a sociological perspective in post-industrialized, transitional, and developing societies. Students are required to complete an original research paper/project. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or SOC 223 or SOC 228 and EGL 102.

SOC 361 Gender Theory

Gender theory examines how the categories of sex and gender influence our ways of living and thinking. We will examine the prevalence of gender inequality in society and how it might be eradicated. We will also emphasize the ways in which socio-economic position, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, geography, and/or ability interact with gender to shape our experiences. Students will gain better insight into how gender impacts their lives at work, at home, and in public. Students will learn how to apply gender theories to their own lives, identities, and social worlds. Note: Students cannot earn credit for SOC 361 and SOC 361W; SOC 361W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): SOC 200 or 282 or 283 or PSY 230 or 307 and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher.

SOC 407 Field Research in Sociology

This is an advanced course in qualitative research methodologies. Students read, design, and complete a field research project using their data from Sociological Research Methods or research internship. Students will learn advanced sociological analysis through the presentation of classic theories and case studies in class, and will apply them to their research projects. Prerequisite(s): SOC 366 and Senior level status.

SOC 480 Research Internship I

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): SOC 366 or ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher.

SOC 485 Research Internship II

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): SOC 366 or ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher.