Legal Studies Minor

This minor is intended for students who are interested in the study of the law in their undergraduate education and may serve as an introduction for students who are interested in pursuing a legal career. The Legal Studies minor consists of 15 credits (five 3-credit courses). Students will be required to take the introductory course in legal studies (POL 110: Introduction to Legal Studies) plus four additional courses chosen with the approval of the program’s coordinator. Alternatively, the student may elect to substitute either a law focused internship or directed independent study for one of these four additional courses.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will gain fundamental knowledge of the nature and function of law and of specific legal principles.
  • Students will acquire an interdisciplinary appreciation of the importance of legal rights and obligations in society.
  • Students will develop competencies that will prepare them for further study in law or employment assisting in a legal environment.

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Business | Dr. Nanda Viswanathan | business@farmingdale.edu | 934-420-2015

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Required:
POL 110: Introduction to Legal Studies

The four additional courses for the minor may be chosen from the following:

AVN 300W Government in Aviation (Writing Intensive)
AVN 400 Aviation Law
BIO 455 Validation and Regulatory Affairs
BUS 202 Business Law I
BUS 230 Environmental Law
BUS 304 Business Law II
BUS 321 International Law
BUS 352 Employment Law
BUS 406 Business Organization Law
CON 361 Government Building, Environmental Codes and Regulations
CRJ 204 Criminal Law
CRJ 205 Criminal Procedure Law
CRJ 404 Cyber Law and Electronic Espionage
ECO 312 Economics of Non-Profit Organizations
POL 250 American National Government
POL 251 State and Local Government
POL 310 Introduction to Political Theory
POL 399 NYS Legislative Internship
SMT 311 Sport Law

POL 110 Introduction to Legal Studies

This is a survey course designed to give the student a basic introduction to law beginning with the various schools of legal philosophical thought, criminal and civil law and procedure, and basic contract law. The course provides the student with an understanding and overview of how the American legal system functions including introducing students to the principles of law, the administration of the legal system, legal terminology, and the inter- relationship between politics, governmental structures, legal professionals and the functioning of the legal system.

AVN 400 Aviation Law

Aviation Law develops the student's knowledge to the application level of learning by emphasis on real cases to demonstrate the legal, regulatory and government theory previously discussed in AVN 101and AVN 300. Emphasis will be on the FAA's roles in regulating aviation including the rule making process, certification of airmen, medical certification and enforcement. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or AVN 300W with a grade of C or higher.

BIO 455 Validation and Regulatory Affairs

An introduction is provided to governmental oversight of drugs, devices and biotherapeutics, and the laws and regulations that apply to development, testing and validation of methods and equipment. There is a survey of the history of US food and drug law, the creation of the FDA, and the current organization and responsibilities of the FDA. Specific US laws and regulations applicable to drugs, devices and biologics and international regulations and import/export concerns are examined. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343 or BIO 348 with a grade of C- or higher.

BUS 202 Business Law I

An introduction to the nature and sources of law; the role the legal system; the law of torts and crimes; the law of contracts; and real and personal property.

BUS 230 Environmental Law

This elective course addresses concerns pertaining to the business environment, instructing students as to the unified ecological approach to which affect management. The political approach to business environmental concerns in the context of constitutional, common law and administrative law theories and case and statutory analysis are examined, referencing basic natural science technology. Designed as a first law course it introduces the business, horticulture and industrial technology student to the legal process applying relevant components of environmental law studies. A nationally adopted text of a major law publisher and contemporary business periodical articles on assigned topics are to be used extensively.

BUS 304 Business Law II

An introduction to the law of sales and lease contracts, letters of credit, commercial paper and secured transactions under the UCC and creditor's rights and remedies, including surety ship and guaranty, insurance, wills, trusts, elder law and consumer protection. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 or Department approval

BUS 321 International Law

This course provides study in the basic concepts and processes of the international legal system. The interaction of state, federal, and international law as well as the relationship of international law and the American legal system are explained. Particular attention is given to current problems faced by managers and to the dominant political, social economic, and technological forces influencing the evolution of international law. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202

BUS 352 Employment Law

This course reviews the field of law governing employment. Topics covered include the following: Employment relationship and procedure, selection, testing, privacy, termination, and arbitration; employment discrimination regarding the Civil Rights Act, Affirmative Action, racial discrimination, sex discrimination, family leave and pregnancy discrimination, sexual orientation, religious discrimination, national origin discrimination, age discrimination and disability discrimination. Also covered are employment regulations regarding unions and collective bargaining agreements, wage and hour regulations, occupational safety and health, workers' compensation, and employee benefits. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202

BUS 406 Business Organization Law

An introduction to the law of agency, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, securities, regulations, bankruptcy, employment and anti-trust laws. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 or Department approval.

CON 361 Government Building, Environmental Codes and Regulations

This course studies the concepts in preparation of an environmental impact statement. It also reviews state and local building and land use controls. Attention will be given to governmental regulations required to obtain building permits for particular construction projects. Prerequisite(s): CON 162

CRJ 204 Criminal Law

The course introduces students to the criminal law system and its function within the criminal justice system, specifically through the discussion of New York State Penal Law. The course will examine offense types and degrees, as well as the elements of specified offenses, with reference to principal rules of criminal liability. Students will employ the case analysis method to study case precedents. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 100

CRJ 205 Criminal Procedure Law

This course focuses on the rules of evidence, operation, and policy that make up criminal procedure. Emphasis will be placed on New York Criminal Procedure Law and its rules regarding arrest, force, and search and seizure. Case Tracking tools that are used within prosecution and court units and systems will be discussed, as well as methods of determining trends in practice and rule effectiveness. Students will be able to apply fact patterns to procedure. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 204

ECO 312 Economics of Non-Profit Organizations

This course provides an overview of the regulatory and legal constraints that nonprofit organizations face in the global economy. Students will analyze the strategies nonprofits use in adapting to fluctuating economic and political circumstances. The course will focus on the development of national, international, and transnational nonprofit organizations and the challenges embedded in the regions and industries in which they operate. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 and junior level status

POL 250 American Politics

This course introduces students to American Politics by focusing on national politics. In addition to examining the structure of U.S. government at the federal level, this course will also investigate American political behavior (especially political parties, elections, voting) and selected policy debates the animate contemporary political discussion.

POL 251 State and Local Government

An examination of the structures and purposes of state, county, and municipal political institutions, emphasizing the importance of citizen participation in community affairs and the election process, in enhancing the effectiveness of state legislatures and judicial systems, county and municipal government, and the protection of civil rights through law enforcement.

POL 310 Introduction to Political Theory

This course will introduce students to some of the major themes and classic works of Western political philosophy. Focusing on a central theme (e.g. political obligation, human rights, equality), students will examine how that issue is addressed by some classic political philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx. They will also assess and debate contemporary US theory and practice with regard to the issue at hand. Prerequisite: Any 100 level or higher social science.

POL 399 NYS Legislative Internship

For students participating in the full-time New York State Assembly and Senate Legislator Session Internship programs. Students work as staff members in their assigned State Legislator/Senator's office a minimum of 30 hours a week, conducting. During the internship, students participate in seminars, mock legislative sessions, and weekly research and written assignments. A written report on the internship experience is required of the student at the conclusion of the internship. Internships are open only to qualified junior and seniors with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher through a competitive selection process. Spring semester only. Note: Students must consult with the Campus Liaison Office to determine credit value to be assigned. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department Chair and Junior/Senior Level status and admission to NYS Assembly/Senate Internship Program.

SMT 311 Sport Law

A study of legal issues affecting all aspects of sports, including college, professional and recreational activities. Future professionals within the realm of physical activity and sport need to be aware of the law the many implications it brings to their chosen fields. This class is designed to provide an introduction to various aspects of the law and its influence on sport and physical activity. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202

Last Modified 9/24/20