History Minor

The History minor is designed for students who are interested in deepening their knowledge of American, Western, and World History in order to support their long-term career goals. Selection of courses will depend on the interest of the student. Students seeking to gain an M.A. in Education will be particularly well-served by this minor program, as will students interested in pursuing post-baccalaureate degrees in Law, History, or Government/International Relations. The history minor consists of 18 hours of history courses with no more than 2 courses at the 100 level and at least 2 courses must be 300 level or above.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of important historical events in a particular historical era and geographical area within a broader global context.
  • Students will demonstrate awareness of historiography and historical interpretive differences.
  • Students will explore and employ proper historical research techniques with both documentary and digital resources in completing historical research.
  • Students will be able to evaluate and interpret primary and secondary historical sources and use these properly in writing about history.
  • Students will construct cogent historical arguments and convey them clearly in written form and oral presentations.

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

History, Politics and Geography

Dr. Jeffery S. Gaab
Memorial Hall , Room 230
934-420-2739
hpg@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Required:

18 credits of History (HIS) courses; no more than 6 credits (2 courses) at the 100-level; at least 6 credits (2 courses) at the 300 level; at least 9 credits (3 courses) must be taken at Farmingdale.

In consultation with their advisor, students may apply up to-but no more than- 2 of the following courses to the History minor:

ANT 120 Archaeology 3
ANT 130 North American Indians 3
ANT 210 Modern Anthropology and Globalization 3
ARC 362 History Western Architecture 3
ART 123 Art History 3
ART 201 Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through The Middle Ages 3
ART 202 Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to the Present 3
AVN 101 Aviation Industry: A History Perspective 3
AVN 401 Aviation Economics 3
BUS 350 American Business History 3
CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
ECO 320 Internet and Network Economics 3
ECO 330 Modern Economic Thought 3
HIS 305 Culture and Technology in England 3
MLG 304 French Culture and Civilization 3
MLG 305 Hispanic and Latin American Culture and Civilization 3
MLG 306 Italian Culture and Civilization 3
MLG 308 Arabic Culture and Civilization 3
MLG 315 Art, Culture and Civilization of Spain 3
MTH 315 History of Mathematics (Writing Intensive) 3
MUS 108 Survey of Western Music 3
PHY 119 Physical Science: Technology 3
POL 263 American Foreign Relations 3
POL 267 Politics of the Muslim World 3
RAM 303 Research Experience 3
SOC 200 Introduction to Women's Studies 3
SOC 245 Technology, Society and Social Change 3
SOC 305 Culture and Technology 3
SOC 320 America: Dream and Reality 3
STS 400W Senior Seminar in Science, Technology and Society (Writing Intensive) 3

ANT 120 Archaeology

Archaeology is the study of the cultural evolution of humankind using the material remains of past human behavior. This course introduces the methods, logic and history of archaeology through an examination of several ancient civilizations as understood through their architecture and artifacts. Topics include theoretical issues, fieldwork, and interpretation of artifacts and reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples will be drawn from such cities and civilizations as Mesopotamia, Crete, Troy, Ancient Egypt, Pompeii, and North and South America. Students will visit at least one relevant site, exhibit or museum as a course requirement.

ANT 130 North American Indians

This course provides a comprehensive history of the human groups who populated North America before, during and after this continent became involved with the culture, politics and economics of Europe. It focuses on the dynamic heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed on through the generations. Students will be introduced to the anthropological literature concerned with the study and understanding of Native American cultures and societies. Some field study may be required.

ANT 210 Modern Anthropology and Globalization

Cultural change and the social processes involved are major areas of cultural anthropological research. By introducing students to the application of anthropological methodologies such as field work and cross-cultural comparison, the course examines some of the major issues which confront human beings in a complex rapidly growing and changing world including: globalization, migration and immigration, population changes, social conflict, agricultural/technological development, nutrition, commodity/cultural exchange, and the future of small scale homogeneous societies. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level social science or business course.

ARC 362 History of Western Architecture

A study of the development of building design from the Ancient Egyptians and Greeks throughout the major historical periods to the present. Emphasis is on the evolution of the forms derived from indigenous technologies of periods surveyed.

ART 123 Art History

An analysis of the social, physical and psychological influences affecting the artist during various historical periods through the present. Emphasis is on the interrelationship between the changing purposes of art and variations in the meaning and form of artistic expression.

ART 201 Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through The Middle Ages

A survey of the history of the visual arts from their beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

ART 202 Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to the Present

A survey of the history of the visual arts from the Early Renaissance to the Present. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

AVN 101 Aviation Industry: A History Perspective

This course is a basic survey of the aviation industry viewed from a historical perspective. Topics covered will range from the early days of aviation to the present. The course will also examine the chronology of aviation laws and regulations and how they have changed from aviation beginnings in the United States to present day. At the conclusion of this course, the student will have a comprehensive knowledge of the U.S. air transportation industry and will understand its significant social/economic impact upon the nation and the world.

AVN 401 Airline Economics and Marketing

This course covers the economic development and marketing principles of the air carrier industry. Details of the transition from regulation to deregulation are explored as well as the marketing and financial practices as they exist today under deregulation. The current economic environment is studied along with a detailed examination of airline business and marketing strategies, product design, pricing, revenue management, and distribution channels. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and AVN 300 with a grade of C or higher.

BUS 350 American Business History

The course focuses on major developments in American business history, covering the period from the early colonial period through the present time. Students will describe and summarize significant historical developments to American industry and business practice, and will analyze and classify major factors influencing business and economic change, including technology, natural resource exploitation, and government policy, with special focus on monetary policy, the gold standard, and tariffs. Students will also interpret modern policy and business practice through the lens of historical business developments. Students will also develop and analyze profiles of American financial and industrial leaders and the companies and industries they created. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher.

CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

In this introductory course, the roots of the criminal justice system will be explored, along with the specific processes of law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The understanding of Supreme Court cases will be connected to these areas of the system. Further understanding will be developed in areas of theory, crime elements and crime trends. Current issues in the criminal justice system will also be discussed.

ECO 320 Internet and Network Economics

A study of the economic structure and growth of the modern economy focusing on the effect and impact of emerging technologies on industry, employment, financial markets and market structure. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157

ECO 330 Modern Economic Thought

The purpose of this course is to study the most important economic theories of the recent past in order to gain a better understanding, not only of these earlier economic theories, but also of the nature of economic theory in general and of the strengths and weaknesses of modern micro and macro-economics and policymaking. We will study the major schools of Modern Economic Thought -Neo-Classical, Austrian, Keynesian, Monetarist, etc. We will examine these theories to trace the long term thought on economic problems like value theory, money and inflation, free trade, macro- economics stability, etc. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and ECO 157

HIS 305 Culture and Technology in England

This course is a multidisciplinary examination of the ways in which technology affected everyday life during the Industrial Revolution in England. Covering the years 1750 to 1880, it examines the changes taking place in technology during the period; how these changes ultimately affected the workplace, the home, and the community and how novelists of the period felt about these changes. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HUM 305 or SOC 305. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 and One social science course or HIS 114 and HIS 115.

MLG 304 French Culture and Civilization

An examination of contemporary France and its political, economic and social development. French cultural life and institutions in France will also be considered. This course may not be used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MLG 305 Hispanic and Latin American Culture and Civilization

Civilization course: Provides a general perspective on the formation of the Latin American Culture through the centuries, with special emphasis on Spanish America. In parallel form, historical and cultural evolution of the New World and the Iberian Peninsula will be studied, from their beginnings up to the present. Among other aspects, the course will give special attention to the rich multicultural heritage which has been maintained in Latin America through the centuries, as well as its achievements in Art and Literature. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MLG 306 Italian Culture and Civilization

An examination of contemporary Italy and its political, economic and social development. Italian cultural life and institutions in Italy will also be considered. This course may not be used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirements. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MLG 308 Arabic Culture and Civilization

This course examines Arabic culture and civilization through an analysis of historical, educational, social and climatic factors. The course will focus on issues arising out of intra-cultural and intercultural communication with today's economic and socio-political currents focusing on American and Arab relations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MLG 315 Art, Culture and Civilization of Spain

Study of Spain, a multicultural and multilingual nation, not as a homogeneous entity but rather as a heterogeneous tapestry of various culture and languages. The corpus of cultural texts studied will be derived from the realms of literature, film, architecture, music and the visual arts. They will be analyzed within their socio- historical context as well as their aesthetic value. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for SPA 315. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MUS 108 Survey of Western Music

This course will introduce students to music from Ancient Greek times to present. The course will also allow students to appreciate music in relation to the other arts, to other cultures, and to historical events.

PHY 119 Physical Science: Technology

A descriptive course emphasizing the major events in Technological History, the Rise of Scientific Technology, Delivery Systems, Systems Science, and the impact of Technology of Man and Society. The course is intended to assist the student in the formulation of a personal set of criteria in order to understand and respond to technological changes in modern society.

POL 263 American Foreign Relations

A focus on American foreign relations in the post-World War II era, describing the transition from isolationism to the adoption of mutual security agreements, and political and constitutional sanctions which sustain the nation's overseas commitments.

POL 267 Politics of the Muslim World

This course provides an introduction to the global politics Islam, including regional issues in the Arab world, Central Asia, and South Asia, as well as the impact of Islamic politics on parts of the globe where Muslims represent a significant minority (Europe, Russia, China, and sub-Saharan Africa).

RAM 303 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals.

SOC 200 Introduction to Women's Studies

An interdisciplinary approach that will draw on literature, history, sociology, as well as science and technology, the course will introduce students to issues in gender that cross traditional disciplines. Cultural assumptions about gender will be examined, and students will be encouraged to consider new ways of looking at knowledge in light of new understanding about the ways in which gender constructs beliefs and influences life's realities. Prerequisite(s): Introductory social science course and EGL 102.

SOC 245 Technology, Society and Social Change

This course explores the ways in which science, technology, and society create social change. The focus is on the varying benefits, costs, and consequences of these changes across historical eras and cultures. This course carries a hands-on computer component as a requirement. Prerequisite(s): One course in social science

STS 400W Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society (Writing Intensive)

The Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society is a capstone course for those students intending to graduate from the Science, Technology, & Society (STS) program. Students will participate in a reading and writing-intensive seminar organized around a common theme in the sciences and technologies, exploring how social, political, and cultural values affect the production and dissemination of knowledge and the development and use of new technologies. Students in the seminar will be required to complete a substantial research project integrating what they have learned during their course of study and their specific areas of interest. Students should consult the department before registering for any seminar course. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for STS 400 and 400W; STS 400W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Science, Technology, & Society Department Prerequisite(s): Senior status in STS program and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher.

Last Modified 9/24/20