Art & Graphic Design Minor

The Art & Graphic Design Minor is an 18-21 credit adjustable minor designed to suit the artistic interests of the individual student. All students will gain a basic foundation of art and design skills and an opportunity for further study in areas such as art history and related humanities, fine arts, graphic design and/or digital photography.

Students interested in this minor must be accepted into the minor by the Visual Communications department and meet with an advisor to choose appropriate courses.

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

Visual Communications

Prof. Bill Steedle, Chair
Hale Hall, Room 156
934-420-2181
artdept@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Required:
VIS 112 2-D Design 3
VIS 116 Digital Media or VIS 110 Drawing I 3
VIS 260 Graphic Design for Non VIS Majors 3

Pick 3-4 (3 courses must be at the 200 level or higher)

Art History and Related Humanities
ART 200 History of Graphic Design 3
ART 201 Art History: Prehistoric — Middle Ages 3
ART 202 Art History: Renaissance — Present 3
ART 302 Art History: Survey of American Art 3
EGL 269 The Romantic Arts: Art Dance Literature and Music 3
EGL 311 Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media 3
EGL 308 The City in Literature, Art, Film and Theater 3
Fine Arts
VIS 101 Introduction to Drawing (with VIS permission only) 3
VIS 103 Introduction to Watercolor 3
VIS 104 Introduction to Calligraphy 3
VIS 105 Introduction to Photography (with VIS permission only) 3
VIS 110 Drawing I 3
VIS 120 Drawing II 3
VIS 214 Figure Drawing I 3
VIS 215 Introduction to Animation 3
VIS 216 Painting I 3
VIS 217 Introduction to Printmaking 3
VIS 252 Drawing and Painting Techniques 3
VIS 318 Figure Drawing II 3
Design
VIS 122 Typography I 3
VIS 115 3D Design 3
VIS 225 Photography I 3
VIS 228 4D Design 3
VIS 238 Illustration for Graphic Designers 3
VIS 240 Publication Design I 3
VIS 242 Publication Design II 3
VIS 250 Photography II 3
VIS 254 Package Design 3
VIS 265 Web Design for Non-Majors 3
VIS 353 Editorial Design 3
VIS 354 Corporate Identity 3
Combine any 3 of the following 1 credit courses:
VIS 280 Adobe Illustrator 1
VIS 281 Adobe Photoshop 1
VIS 282 Adobe Photoshop for the Web 1
VIS 283 Adobe Dreamweaver 1
VIS 284 Adobe InDesign 1
VIS 285 Basic HTML/CSS for Graphic Design 1

Other VIS 200+ courses may be considered as electives if approved by the Department Chair.

Curriculum Summary

Total Credits: 18-21

VIS 112 Two-Dimensional Design

This course is an in-depth examination of the elements and principles of design and how they influence the creation of two-dimensional compositions. Students will acquire vocabulary and concepts that will be used throughout their careers. Individual visual expression will be emphasized through design assignments that allow the exploration of a variety of media and tools. Contemporary and historically significant works of art and design will be utilized. This will help students recognize the successful application of the elements and principles of design for evaluating their own work and that of their peers.

VIS 116 Digital Media and Methods

The concepts and techniques of digital media are essential for the modern graphic designer. This course serves as an essential foundation for all subsequent courses in computer graphics. Students will gain an understanding of how this evolving technology applies to the visual communication industry and will be introduced to the hardware and software utilized within the field. The terminology that we use as designers when dealing with technology will also be stressed. Networking, printing, file sharing, on-line course management tools, etc., specific to the Visual Communication Department and Farmingdale State College campus will be covered. This course is required and must be taken in residence at Farmingdale.

VIS 110 Drawing I

Drawing is the foundation for all other applications of design. To that end, this course explores the principles of freehand drawing, and emphasizes the use of line, light and shade, perspective, proportion and pictorial composition. Subject matter in class will include both still-life (natural and fabricated) and an introduction to drawing the figure. Students will experiment with a variety of black and white media as they learn about drawing and all its possibilities, both creative and analytical.

VIS 260 Graphic Design for Non-Majors

Graphic Design for Non-Majors introduces the principles and processes of graphic design. Emphasis will be on conceptual development, organization of information and effective communication with the formal integration of type and imagery. Students will learn to think critically, make aesthetic judgments, and become familiar with a variety of tools and techniques used to produce work in the fields of design.

ART 200 History of Graphic Design

Graphic design has great power and has both reflected and influenced our society and culture throughout history. This course identifies the key movements within the history of graphic design from the Graphic Renaissance throughout today and highlights how these movements have mirrored and changed the course of our society and the field of graphic design. Lectures, images and texts will be used in of each of the following periods: Graphic Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution, Mid-Century Modernism, Late-Modernism Post-Modernism and the Digital Age. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

ART 201 Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through The Middle Ages

A survey of the history of the visual arts from their beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

ART 202 Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to the Present

A survey of the history of the visual arts from the Early Renaissance to the Present. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

ART 302 Art History: Survey of American Art

A survey of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the early colonial period to the present. Lectures, supplemented by slides and textbook illustrations, will provide the basis for an analysis of the "schools" styles, and influences that determined and are affecting the direction of American Art.

EGL 269 The Romantic Arts: Art, Dance, Literature and Music

This course examines the art, dance, literature and music of the Romantic Period of each of the disciplines. Students will acquire an understanding of the aesthetic concerns of each of these art forms in the period in which they were created and develop a critical vocabulary that will allow them to better understand, evaluate, and discuss the works in depth. Course work includes readings, field trips to art exhibits and performances, and extensive use of audio-visual materials. The course will require both informal and formal papers that utilize primary and secondary research materials. By examining multiple art forms, students will develop greater aesthetic and critical understanding of the art forms of the Romantic period included in the course study. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 269 and 269W; EGL 269W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 308 The City In Literature, Art, Film and Theatre

This course examines depictions and interpretations of the city through literature, film, theatre, photography, painting, sculpture and architecture. Initially, the focus will be on New York City, although subsequent semesters, it may extend to other major world cities such as London, Paris, Rome, or Athens. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic value of the different art forms as well as develop the critical vocabulary to help them evaluate the various literary and artistic works. Course work includes assigned readings, field trips to museums in New York City, and extensive use of audio-visual material. Both informal writing (response journals) and more formal papers, including a research paper utilizing primary research (photographs, maps, interviews with artists, slides etc.) and secondary critical and/or historical studies will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 308 and 308W; EGL 308W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

VIS 101 Introduction to Drawing

Students will be introduced to basic observational freehand drawing techniques, including line, form, light and shade and composition. Students will study examples of work from various artists and have an opportunity to apply this knowledge in the studio and in outdoor settings.

VIS 103 Introduction to Watercolor

Students will be introduced to basic watercolor techniques, including color, value, shape and composition. Students will study examples of work from various watercolor artists and have an opportunity to apply this knowledge in the studio and outdoor settings.

VIS 104 Introduction to Calligraphy

An introduction to the history and technique of the calligraphic arts. Students will gain insight into the origins and development of hand-lettered communication throughout history. Topics will range from illuminated manuscripts to contemporary calligraphic artists. Students will apply this knowledge to their own calligraphy projects.

VIS 105 Introduction to Photography

This course is an introduction to the history, art and technique of photography. By utilizing their own cameras and commercial processing, students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to produce well-composed and properly exposed creative photographs. The estimated student cost for materials, including film, processing and other supplies is approximately $200 (not including camera).

VIS 110 Drawing I

Drawing is the foundation for all other applications of design. To that end, this course explores the principles of freehand drawing, and emphasizes the use of line, light and shade, perspective, proportion and pictorial composition. Subject matter in class will include both still-life (natural and fabricated) and an introduction to drawing the figure. Students will experiment with a variety of black and white media as they learn about drawing and all its possibilities, both creative and analytical.

VIS 120 Drawing II

This course furthers the investigations of drawing as the foundation for all other applications of design. Students will expand their understanding of perspective and structural drawing, and continue the development of the perception, skill and knowledge necessary to draw the human figure. In addition to working in graphite and charcoal, students will also experiment with a variety of drawing surfaces and media, including ink wash and watercolor. Prerequisite(s): VIS 110

VIS 214 Figure Drawing I

Introduce design and illustration students to the basic concepts of drawing the human figure from life. Two thirds of the semester will be devoted to drawing the nude model in the studio, while one third of the course will be devoted to drawing the clothed figure in the studio. Prerequisite(s): VIS 120

VIS 215 Introduction to Animation

The course will provide an exploration of animation techniques and applications from early development through digital media. Students will study selected traditional and electronic animation techniques from storyboard through the final animated production. The course will concentrate on storytelling using different animation methods in a digital environment.

VIS 216 Painting I

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of painting. All students will work in the medium of oil paint. Because drawing is the basis of all visual means of expression, this course will incorporate an analytical approach to seeing and drawing from life and will quickly progress to working with paint. This course will be conducted through lectures, demonstrations, critiques and predominantly through the interaction between instructor and student. Each student will be asked to complete approximately seven paintings by the end of the semester.

VIS 217 Introduction to Printmaking

This mixed–media course introduces the student to the basic fundamentals and concepts of non-toxic printmaking: the development of an image on a printing plate, the transfer of the image to paper, edition printing, matting and presentation. Media will include photo and digital transfer, woodcut prints, silkscreen, intaglio, collagraphs and monoprints. Emphasis is placed on the student’s exploration of this creative process to produce and develop exciting prints.

VIS 252 Drawing and Painting Techniques

This course will offer an advanced study and exploration of painting and drawing techniques. Students will be expected to enter the course with a proficiency of drawing skills having completed Drawing I, Drawing II and Figure Drawing as prerequisites. Students will acquire a wide range of skills related to drawing and painting. Advanced techniques and media will enable students to attain a higher level of artistic self-expression. Prerequisite(s): VIS 120

VIS 122 Typography I

Typography is the formal study of letterform. Each typeface has qualities that allow it to be identified, classified and appreciated for its own individual beauty. In this course, students will gain perspective into this important field by starting with a focus on early visual communication, symbols handwritten letterforms, calligraphy and the development of movable type. Students will then explore ways to categorize type into families and identify and define the similarities and subtle differences in classical typeface. Class discussions, projects, critiques and lectures will focus on typographic terminology and vocabulary, as well as the aesthetic discipline of using type effectively as a designer. An emphasis will be placed on typography as an essential element of graphic design. Prerequisite(s): VIS 112 and 116

VIS 115 Three-Dimensional Design

Three-dimensional is the foundation for many of the specialized areas of graphic design, including package design, product design, environmental graphics, animation and three-dimensional modeling. Thus, this course stresses the application and appreciation of the principles and elements that make successful three-dimensional designs. Study will include: mass, volume, line, surface, plane, space, time and motion. In the design and construction of three-dimensional objects, students will explore a variety of materials and construction methods. Constructions will be made typically of wood, paper, bristol board, foam core, corrugated board, plaster and other three-dimensional materials. The course will also stress the efficient and safe use of tools and materials.

VIS 225 Photography I

This course introduces photographic principles with the primary emphasis on the technical issues of photography in studio and natural lighting conditions. Students will learn the concepts and techniques for proper lighting, exposure, focus, depth-of-field, and creative composition. The methodology for the creation of compelling and original photographic images will be covered as it applies to graphic design projects. Image management software, archival storage solutions, and presentation techniques will be explored. Students must supply their own digital camera (see department web page for current specific equipment requirements). Prerequisite(s): VIS 112 and 116

VIS 228 Four-Dimensional Design

4 D (4-Dimensional) design will explore the process of designing user experiences that rely heavily on time, space and motion to communicate an idea. In this course students will examine the increasingly important role time-based media plays in the world of graphic design. Applications may include web design, video, animation, storyboards and sequential narratives. Students will concentrate on using storytelling techniques and experiential structures to provide a viewer with an immersive experience. Prerequisite(s): VIS 116 and VIS 122

VIS 238 Illustration for Graphic Designers

An understanding of illustration can help graphic designers to create more conceptually powerful designs and to differentiate their work from the competition. This course will focus on sketching and drawing to facilitate the efficient communication of ideas from the initial thumbnail sketch through to a finished piece. Design projects will be solved through the integration of traditional design skills, with illustrations created in a variety of media. It will provide insight into the language and practice of illustration while offering graphic design students the opportunity to develop a personal approach to illustration that can become integral to their design work. Prerequisite(s): VIS 120 and 222

VIS 240 Publication Design I

A survey of the concepts and applications of graphic design, typography and page layout as they pertain to publication design. This course is intended for students enrolled in the Professional Communications curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on effective communication, aesthetics, and conformity to corporate identity guidelines. Prerequisite(s): BCS 102

VIS 242 Publication Design II

The continuing exploration of graphic design, typography and page layout as they pertain to publication design. This course is intended for students enrolled in the Professional Communications curriculum. Students will apply the concepts learned in prerequisite coursework to a variety of publication projects utilizing professional page layout software. Prerequisite(s): VIS 116

VIS 250 Photography II

Students will continue to examine the concepts and techniques for proper lighting, exposure, focus, depth-of-field, and creative composition. Using electronic media, students explore the production and processing of digital image making and the application of studio techniques. Advanced technical skills for digital photography are covered to increase student awareness of photographic methods necessary for commercial communication, advertising, and photojournalism. Using digital photographic technologies, students experiment and further develop their understanding of the photograph as a vehicle for communicating ideas. Prerequisite(s): Department approval or VIS 225.

VIS 254 Package Design

This course applies the principles of graphic design, typography and three-dimensional design to the specialized area of package design. Students may design labels, boxes, containers and other types of consumer packaging materials, in addition to point-of-purchase displays. Factors influencing the designs will include manufacturing, printing, digital technology, consumer appeal and tampering and label regulations. Prerequisite(s): VIS 112, 122 and 210

VIS 265 Web Design for Non-Majors

Web design encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites. This course will introduce students to the planning, designing and constructing of layouts in web development and interactive design for the internet and screen devices. Course content includes discussions of layout, composition, planning, constructing and maintaining a website.

VIS 353 Editorial Design

Emphasis in this class will be on the creation of multiple page documents for the editorial design market. Students will explore numerous avenues for editorial design including, magazine, catalog, newspaper and book design, while gaining the advanced software skills needed for the creation of these documents. Prerequisite(s): VIS 370

VIS 354 Corporate Identity

This course will explore the visual components behind creating and establishing a corporate identity. Corporations require logos, signs and symbols as part of an elaborate identification system. Visual imagery related to the corporation projects a positive image and public perception of a corporation's identity. This class will explore creative solutions that define and present "corporate identity" through visual imagery. Prerequisite(s): VIS 222 and 230

VIS 280 Introduction to Illustrator

Adobe Illustrator graphic design software is used by graphic designers, web designers, and artists to create vector drawings and imagery for use in different media and platforms. This course will introduce students to the creation of original vector images and artwork, and explore digital illustration techniques to create imagery for a variety of projects and products. These skills will enable the student to properly use the industry's premier vector drawing program. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period.

VIS 281 Introduction to Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is the industry standard photo editing software used by photographers, graphic and web designers, videographers, and artists to enhance and manipulate photos and create original digital artwork. This course will introduce students to the use of this software to create original artwork, edit, restore and retouch existing photography, correct and modify color and explore different digital image techniques to create composites and simulating a variety of special effects. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period.

VIS 282 Photoshop for the Web

Adobe Photoshop is a powerful photo editing software package used by web designers to create original imagery and artwork for web sites and development. This course will further enhance students understanding of this software to create original artwork and prepare it for use on the Internet and screen devices. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period. Prerequisite(s): VIS 281

VIS 283 Introduction to Dreamweaver

Adobe Dreamweaver is the industry-leading web authoring and editing software providing both visual and code-level capabilities for web development and design. This course will introduce students to the use of the fundamentals of Dreamweaver to create and manage web pages and fully functional web sites with an emphasis on best practices and current web standards. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period.

VIS 284 Introduction to InDesign

Adobe InDesign is a design and layout program used to create publications for print, interactive pdf documents, digital magazines, and EPUBs. By combining text, imagery, and graphic elements created from a variety of sources InDesign allows you to create engaging layouts from single pages to multiple page documents and publications. In this introductory course, you will discover the flexibility and outstanding typography features of this program, work with color, imagery and graphics, and prepare professional-level publications for output for multiple platforms. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period.

VIS 285 Basic HTML/CSS Graphic Design

Understanding the principles behind web design as expressed through HTML and CSS is a necessity for designers. Having an understanding of HTML/CSS translates to designs and interfaces that function well. This course will introduce the language, structure and semantic language of HTML and CSS. It will also include instruction on how to utilize and style text, images, forms, and layout. This course runs for five (5) weeks. Registration must be completed during normal registration period.

VIS 200 Survey of Graphic Design

A survey of the history of graphic design from the Graphic Renaissance to the Digital Age. Special attention will be paid to how this history both reflects and influences our society and culture. Lectures, slides and texts will be used in the exploration of each of the following periods: Graphic Renaissance, The Industrial Revolution, Mid-Century Modern, Late-Modernism, Post-Modernism, and the Digital Age.