English Literature Minor

The English Department offers an undergraduate Literature Minor to students who have completed EGL 101 and EGL 102 and are enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs at Farmingdale State College. The English Literature Minor consists of 18 credits. Students must complete nine core credits and nine elective credits. Students must apply through the English Department, and specific course work must be determined in consultation with a full-time faculty member of the English Department. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the English Literature Minor courses is required for awarding of the Minor upon graduation.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will analyze complex literary works within the context of the history and evolution of literary genre
  • Students will analyze complex literary works in relation to specific historical, political and cultural contexts 
  • Students will analyze the interrelationship, both past and present, of complex literary works and disciplines such as philosophy, religion, science, medicine, psychology, sociology, music, art and education
  • Students will demonstrate an enhanced understanding of literary terms and forms
  • Students will demonstrate an enhanced ability to analyze language
  • Students will demonstrate an increased sophistication in the use of language in both oral and written communication
  • Students will demonstrate an enhanced ability to critically assess both online and print sources of literary criticism
  • Students will demonstrate an enhanced ability to write sustained analysis of complex works of literature that incorporates secondary sources and readings

About Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an "Academic Minor." A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department based minors (e.g. computer programming & info systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies).

Academic minors are approved by the College-Wide Curriculum Committee and the Provost. Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Registrar's Office Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of the academic minor will appear on the student's transcript at the time of graduation.

  • A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student's major program of study.
  • Completion of a minor is not a graduation requirement and is subject to the availability of the courses selected. However, if the requirements for a minor are not completed prior to certification of graduation in the major, it will be assumed that the minor has been dropped. Consequently, the student will only be certified for graduation in their primary major.
  • Only students in 4 year baccalaureate programs can apply for a minor.
  • A minor should consist of 15 to 21 credits.
  • At least 12 credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher.
  • At least 9 credits must be residency credits.
  • Specific requirements for each minor are determined by the department granting the minor. 
  • Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 in their minor.  Some minors may require a higher GPA.
  • Students are prohibited from declaring a minor in the same discipline as their major (e.g. one cannot combine an applied math minor with an applied math major). Academic minors may not apply to all curricula.
  • Students are permitted to double-count courses.
  • Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with appropriate written approval of their department chair or curriculum Dean.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

English & Humanities

Dr. Marlene San Miguel Groner
Knapp Hall, Room 13
934-420-2050
englishandhumanities@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Core: (9 credits)

Survey Course - One course from the following part one survey courses offered by the Department:

EGL 201 English Literature: Old English through the 18th Century
EGL 203 American Literature: Beginnings to 1865
EGL 206 World Literature: Early Classics

Survey Course - One course from the following part two survey courses offered by the Department:

EGL 202 English Literature: 19th Century to the Present
EGL 204 American Literature: 1865 to the Present
EGL 207 World Literature: The Moderns

Genre Course - One course from the following genre courses offered by the Department:

EGL 210 Introduction to Drama
EGL 212 Introduction to Fiction
EGL 214 Introduction to Poetry

Electives: (9 credits)

Three courses must be chosen from this list; at least two of the three courses must be 300-level:

A third 200-level survey course (see above), in addition to the two core survey courses

EGL 200 Shakespeare
EGL 216 Creative Writing
EGL 222 Women in Literature
EGL 225 Images of Women in Drama
EGL 228 Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture
EGL 232 Immigrant Literature: Voices of Multicultural America
EGL 240 Themes in Science Fiction in Film and Literature
EGL 242 Film and Literature
EGL 244 Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature
EGL 246 Themes in Literature
EGL 250 Young Adult Literature
EGL 266 Fantasy in Literature and Film
EGL 269 The Romantic Arts: Art, Dance, Literature & Music
EGL 302 Nineteenth Century English Novel
EGL 307 Special Topics in Literature
EGL 308 The City in Literature, Art, Film and Theatre
EGL 309 Voices of Black America in Poetry, Prose and Song
EGL 312 Major Authors in American Literature
EGL 314 Major Authors in World Literature
EGL 316 Women in Modern American Literature
EGL 317 Studies in Shakespeare
EGL 319 Modern Drama
EGL 322 Leadership in Fact, Fiction and Film
EGL 323 Major Authors in British Literature
EGL 330 Ancient Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides
EGL 331 Death, Madness and Sex: The Victorians

EGL 201 English Literature: Old English through the 18th Century

A historical survey of English literature from the beginnings to neoclassicism. Consideration is given to Anglo-Saxon and medieval writers, Chaucer, Elizabethan and Jacobean writers, Shakespeare, Milton, and the writers of the Age of Reason. English history, religion, and philosophy are studied as they relate to literature. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 203 American Literature: Beginnings to 1865

An examination of major historical and new canonical American authors; genres, and periods of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and part of the nineteenth centuries up to the Civil War. An analysis of the works of writers of the New Republic, the Revolutionary and Federalist periods of the eighteenth century, as well as the emerging national literatures of indigenous and colonizing groups; the ages of Transcendentalism, American Gothic, early Realism as well as the works of Native American, Feminist, African-American, Abolitionist, Frontier and Civil War writers will be considered. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 206 World Literature: Early Classics

An introduction to Western and non-Western literature from earliest times through the seventeenth century. Included are works from ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval and Renaissance Europe, the Middle East, Africa, China, and India. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 202 English Literature: 19th Century to the Present

An historical survey of Romantic, Victorian and Modernist literature. Emphasis is placed on the development and continuity of literary traditions. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher.

EGL 204 American Literature: 1865 to the Present

An examination of major historical and new canonical American authors, genres and periods of the era from the Civil War through the twenty-first century. An analysis of such trends as Realism, Naturalism, immigrant literature, the regional and local color movements, as well as the rise of biographical genres, and the influence of psychology and technology on literature will be made. Modernism, the renaissance in American poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, and the literature of social critique will also be examined. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 204 and 204W; EGL 204W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 207 World Literature: The Moderns

An introduction to Western and non-Western literature from the eighteenth century through the twentieth century. Included are works from authors of the Enlightenment, the Romantic and Realist Movements, and the twentieth century from the Continent and the Third World. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 210 Introduction to Drama

A survey of Western drama stressing close reading of plays from ancient Greece, Elizabethan and Restoration England, nineteenth-century Scandinavia and Russia, and twentieth-century Britain and America. The changing concepts of comedy and tragedy are discussed. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 210 and 210W; EGL 210W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 212 Introduction to Fiction

A survey of American, British, and continental prose fiction. An understanding of the critical theory of such works is stressed. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 214 Introduction to Poetry

A survey of English language poetry. Selected works of both traditional and contemporary poets are analyzed and discussed. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 214 and 214W; EGL 214W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 200 Shakespeare

A survey of representative comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories showing Shakespeare's dramatic variety. Acting styles are emphasized with the use of recordings, tapes and, when possible, live performances. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 216 Creative Writing

An introduction to a wide spectrum of written formats, especially those employed by writers of fiction and poetry. Students read in these genres and submit a short written piece, in either genre, for each class. In addition, students complete a major project in their chosen area. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 222 Women in Literature

An exploration of the position of women in various cultures as interpreted by major world writers. Focus is on the female protagonist's attainment of goals in marriage, family, and work. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 225 Images of Women in Drama

A study of images of women in Western drama from ancient times to the present. This course will consider the development of drama as a popular art form reflecting gender issues of its time. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 225 and 225W; EGL 225W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 228 Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture

This course presents a cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary examination of the meaning and value of such myths as those of the creation, the flood, and the hero, and their depiction in literature, art, film, and music from the ancient past to the present. Students will acquire an understanding of the uses of mythical themes and archetypes both in ancient art and literature as well as in modern art, literature, and film. Course work includes assigned readings, film screenings, informal journals, a formal paper and exams. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 232 Voices of Multicultural America

A study of selected fiction, poetry, autobiography and memoirs of American immigrants of the 20th and 21st centuries. The thematic focus of this course is the way in which writers from different cultures shape the stories of their lives, particularly as they encounter the realities of American experience and test the truth of their American dreams. Lecture and discussion of individual writers will address the different genres and styles used by these immigrant writers as well as thematic parallels and differences between writers from different cultural backgrounds. Readings may vary each semester but will reflect the cultural diversity of American immigrant writing, including writing by Caribbean writers, Asian-Americans, Latino Americanos, Jewish, Italian, Irish, and other Eastern European immigrants. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 240 Themes in Science Fiction in Film and Literature

An exploration of how writers of science fiction have used science and technology to examine moral questions, social issues and the boundaries of technology. Readings of selected authors will focus on the ways creative writers have explored various aspects of the genre, including scientific experimentation, alternate time/space continuum, weaponry, psychic phenomena, cyberspace, bionics, alien life and the future. The class will also view cinematic adaptations of the selected works to examine whether/how the change of medium affects the emphasis and impact of the work and how visualization and special effects affect the audience's perception. Course work includes assigned readings, film screenings, informal journals, and formal papers. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 242 Film and Literature

Students will read selected short fiction and novels by English, American and other writers and view the films that have been made from them by prominent directors. The course will develop students' understanding and appreciation of both literature and film. Students will examine how great writers elicit the complex response they do from their readers, and then explore the ways that film provides an interpretation of literature. Analysis and discussion will center on how the visual media shapes literature as various directors adapt texts for the screen. The ability to interpret the texts and films appreciatively and critically will be assessed through a series of class projects and examinations. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 242 and 242W; EGL 242W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 244 Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature

This course engages students in the principle forms of artistic expression integral to classic works of supernatural literature and their cinematic adaptations. Students will acquire an understanding of the creative process inherent in these works, an understanding of the literary and cinematic conventions of the genre and will also develop a critical vocabulary that will allow them to discuss and to evaluate these works and others in depth. Cinematic adaptations of these works in particular follow the evolution of the cinema itself; thus students in this course will also gain a critical understanding of its aesthetic and technological development. This course will also focus on film composition, including the shots, angles, iconography and editing typical of this genre. Course work includes assigned readings, informal and formal papers requiring primary and secondary research, critical analysis of required screenings, and exams. Students will be required to attend and to complete critical analyses of campus and off-campus theatrical screenings as they are scheduled. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 244 and 244W; EGL 244W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 246 Themes in Literature

This course will enable students to explore a major literary theme. The theme may vary in different semesters or in different sections of the course during a single semester. Themes may include nature writings, literature of the Holocaust, literature of the American West, and Long Island in fiction, among others. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 250 Young Adult Literature

Students will trace the historical and psychological development of the concept of “adolescence” by studying the canonical literature for young adults that shaped cultural ideas of adolescence. Students will read a wide representation of classic 20th century Young Adult authors, including Judy Blume, Robert Cormier, Chris Crutcher, Paula Danziger, S.E. Hinton, Harper Lee, Lois Lowry, Patricia MacLachlan, Walter Dean Meyers, Gary Paulsen, Cynthia Voigt, and Paul Zindel. The class focuses on the literary analysis of different Young Adult genres: dystopia, fantasy, historical fiction, realism, nonfiction, photojournalism, and graphic novels. Class is conducted through the innovative method of reading circles, and so requires active student participation. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 266 Fantasy in Literature and Film

Fantasy in Literature and Film examines not only the oldest literary genre but one that continues to fascinate readers old and young and to inspire some of the most innovative and technically sophisticated films. Works of fantasy overlap other genres: myth, fairy tales, epic sagas, tales of the grotesque, juvenilia, adventure stories, and some science fiction. However, fantasy is the study of what can never actually be real, that is, what we dream about or can only imagine. Readings include traditional works of fantasy from the earliest recorded texts as well as beloved children's and young adult "classics" of this genre. Film adaptations as well as original films in this genre will also be analyzed and critiqued. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 269 The Romantic Arts: Art, Dance, Literature and Music

This course examines the art, dance, literature and music of the Romantic Period of each of the disciplines. Students will acquire an understanding of the aesthetic concerns of each of these art forms in the period in which they were created and develop a critical vocabulary that will allow them to better understand, evaluate, and discuss the works in depth. Course work includes readings, field trips to art exhibits and performances, and extensive use of audio-visual materials. The course will require both informal and formal papers that utilize primary and secondary research materials. By examining multiple art forms, students will develop greater aesthetic and critical understanding of the art forms of the Romantic period included in the course study. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 269 and 269W; EGL 269W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 302 The 19th Century English Novel

Select novels by major British authors of the nineteenth century, such as Austen, the Brontes, Mary Shelley, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Trollope, Hardy and Conrad, are read. Attention is given to the social, economic, political and intellectual backdrop informing the content of the novels. Secondary sources are required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 307 Special Topics in Literature

This course will enable students to explore intensively a major author or literary theme, period or genre. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Topics may include love, lust and marriage; persuasion and propaganda; and World War I writers, among others. Short papers involving secondary sources will be required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 308 The City In Literature, Art, Film and Theatre

This course examines depictions and interpretations of the city through literature, film, theatre, photography, painting, sculpture and architecture. Initially, the focus will be on New York City, although subsequent semesters, it may extend to other major world cities such as London, Paris, Rome, or Athens. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic value of the different art forms as well as develop the critical vocabulary to help them evaluate the various literary and artistic works. Course work includes assigned readings, field trips to museums in New York City, and extensive use of audio-visual material. Both informal writing (response journals) and more formal papers, including a research paper utilizing primary research (photographs, maps, interviews with artists, slides etc.) and secondary critical and/or historical studies will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 308 and 308W; EGL 308W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 309 Voices of Black America in Poetry, Prose and Song

A study of the oral and literary tradition of African Americans in poetry, prose and song. This course provides both a historical examination of the written and oral tradition of African Americans in its own right and as a lens through which American culture can be viewed. The course will explore the developing aesthetic concerns of this tradition in different historical periods as, for example, the question of dialect before, during and after the Harlem Renaissance and the later Black Arts movement up through contemporary rap. Students will also consider how many texts by African Americans combine literary and musical forms, particularly spirituals, blues, jazz, hip hop and rap. Critical readings and research project required. Students who have completed EGL 224 may not receive credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 312 Major Authors in American Literature

An in-depth examination of the major trends in American Literature as reflected specifically through the works of individual authors. The instructor will select the two or three authors to be studied each semester. Secondary sources, a major research project, and an annotated bibliography of criticism of a particular work will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 312 and 312W; EGL 312W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 314 Major Authors in World Literature

An in-depth examination of major trends in world literature as reflected through the works of individual authors. One to three authors are studied each semester. Requirements include a substantial research project involving critical research. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 316 Women in Modern Literature

In this course students will examine major American texts by women writers from the beginning of first wave feminism to the present. While most of the works studied will be narrative fiction, some non-fiction, drama, poetry, and memoirs are included. Themes addressed in this course include women's relation to work, religion, nature, marriage and family, their struggle for voting rights, equal treatment under the law, and as immigrants to America from different cultures. The focus of the course is the ways in which literary works both reflect and help to shape the history and culture of America. This includes examination of how particular genres, styles of writing, and literary techniques are utilized by the writers covered in this selective survey of American women writers. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 316 and 316W; EGL 316W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 317 Studies in Shakespeare

An analysis of Shakespearean plays, along with their sources, the early modern period in England, and traditional and contemporary critical commentary. Four or five plays will be studied each semester. Requirements will include examinations and analysis of plays. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 319 Modern Drama

This course provides an in-depth examination of representative plays of Modern Drama (late nineteenth century through the twentieth century), focusing on such literary movements as realism, expressionism, relativism, epic theater, theater of the absurd, and focusing on the historical and cultural context of the different literary movements and the representative plays. Requirements include a research project involving traditional and contemporary criticism. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 322 Leadership in Fact, Fiction and Film

Leadership in Fiction, Fact, and Film examines various fiction and non-fiction materials from a business perspective. Students will explore leadership, ethics/values, motivation, interpersonal skills, power/authority, communication, gender roles, empowerment, change, etc., as these concepts are demonstrated in these various works. Students will analyze the problems in the materials and apply them to modern-day corporate work situations, reflecting upon how these works are practical and functional to successful management tasks, responsibilities, and leadership. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 323 Major Authors in British Literature

An in-depth examination of major trends in British literature as reflected through the works of individual authors. One to three authors are studied in depth each semester. Requirements include a research project involving traditional and contemporary criticism. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 330 Classical Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides

This course introduces students to the Classical Greek Theater and its three great Athenian tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides through close readings of surviving texts in translation and through viewings of modern productions of these ancient theatrical works. Focusing on these playwrights' works both as art forms and as products of a specific historical society, the course will address the role this drama played in the lives, culture, and aesthetic sensibilities of the ancient Greeks as well as its role as a living art form in contemporary society. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 331 Death, Madness and Sex: The Victorians

Focusing on three of the predominant obsessions of Victorian society, this course will study the literary, artistic, and aesthetic explorations of these themes by authors such as Dickens, Stoker, Wilde, Tennyson, Rossetti, and Browning and artists such as Millais, Burne-Jones, Hunt, Leighton, Waterhouse, and Dadd to gain a comprehensive overview of this major literary, artistic, and cultural period. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

Last Modified 9/24/20