Science, Technology, & Society

Bachelor of Science Degree

Farmingdale State College’s Bachelor of Science (BS) in Science, Technology, & Society (STS) is a dynamic interdisciplinary program that allows students to explore the connections between science, technology, and social change. With a cutting-edge focus on globalization, scientific advancement, and technological innovation, the STS degree represents the epitome of the applied social science program of the 21st century. Our program addresses the employment needs of the region and the diverse academic interests of its majors by providing students with an interdisciplinary program of study that incorporates the practical uses of technological knowledge, scientific inquiry, the application of theory to complex problems, and an integrated approach to the learning process. Students examine the real-world effects of globalization, exploring the historical, political, economic, and sociological impact of worldwide industrialization, cross-border technology transfer, global environmental issues, transnational economic interdependence, the spread of information and communication technologies, and other important facets of the current process of globalization. In addition to hands-on training in the technology-related fields, STS majors also develop a strong background in the ways in which scientific, technological, and industrial development have influenced and continue to shape history, society, and culture on the local, national, and international levels.

Graduates of the Science, Technology, & Society program are suited for employment in a variety of settings where their broad view of the technologies, natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities are desirable for the solution of problems. In particular, the program prepares students for careers in technological professions, government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), environmental agencies, health and wellness, law, diplomacy, and graduate work in the social sciences, liberal arts, and education. Students who are interested in environmental protection and sustainability are able to take advantage of Farmingdale State College’s various “green” initiatives, including our nationally-recognized Solar Energy Center, the Green Building Institute, and other facilities associated with sustainable energy.

As globalization places increasingly complex demands on the workforce of the new millennium, international corporations on Long Island have indicated that their future employment needs include graduates who possess the skills developed by completing the Science, Technology, & Society program. While the primary focus of the Science, Technology, & Society program is to prepare its graduates for careers in the local Long Island region and across New York State, graduates of the STS program have a wide variety of employment options available to them upon graduation. For example, graduates of the program may wish to pursue additional training in an area that they investigated in their selected concentration or may elect to pursue graduate studies in a related discipline. As a result, the STS program provides students with a breadth of choices to embark upon once they have completed their degree.

Science, Technology, & Society (BS) Program Outcomes:

Students will select one of the following concentrations: 1) Global Affairs; 2) Media Studies; 3) Environmental Policy; or 4) Health, Wellness, and Society. At the completion of any of the concentrations within the Science, Technology, & Society program:

  • Graduates will be able to describe and explain many applications of science and technology within our society.
  • Graduates will be able to describe and explain the ways in which technology interacts with the social sciences and other disciplines.
  • Graduates will have an in depth knowledge and understanding of a particular subject, while also being able to compare and contrast broader complex issues involving globalization, media, technological change, health and wellness, and environmental policy.
  • Graduates will be able to work within the framework of a holistic view of globalization and understand real-world applications of globalization by viewing it from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

Science, Technology, & Society

Dr. Edmund Douglass, Chair
Memorial Hall, Room 116
934-420-2220
sts@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Liberal Arts & Sciences (44 credits)
Communications (GE—other than EGL 101) 3
Humanities (GE) 3
Arts (GE) 3
American History (GE) 3
Other World Civilizations (GE) 3
Western Civilization (GE) 3
Mathematics (GE—one at 110 or higher) 6
Foreign Language—Level II (GE)1 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE) 3
Natural Science (GE) 4
Natural Science Elective/Lab 4
EGL 101—Composition I: College Writing 3
EGL 102—Composition II: Writing about Literature 3
Free Electives (9 credits)
STS Technology Requirements (19 credits)
BCS 160—Computers, Society and Technology 3
HIS 212—Technology, Politics, and the Modern World 3
ENV 101—Energy Sustainability and Environment 3
GIS 222—Geovisualization I 4
SOC 245—Technology, Society and Social Change 3
STS 400W—STS Seminar or STS 401W—Internship2 3
STS Concentrations (48 credits)

All students will choose one of the following concentration areas: Global Affairs, Media Studies, Environmental Policy or Health, Wellness and Society. Primary fields, secondary fields, and STS electives will vary by concentration.

7 courses in a primary field 21
4 courses in a secondary field 12
5 STS Perspectives electives (at least 2 at the 300-level or above) 15
Total Credits: 120

1In addition to meeting General Education requirements, STS students must take a Level II (second semester) or higher course in a Foreign Language or demonstrate oral and written fluency.

2A grade of C or higher is required in the Capstone Course (STS 400W or 401W)

All graduates must have 30 credits in residency and a total of 15 credits of Upper Division (300-level or higher) courses in residency.

STS Concentrations:

Note: Many courses require prerequisites. Please see our course catalog.

Global Affairs

The Global Affairs concentration prepares students for career paths in a dynamic world connected by the flow of people, ideas, money, and goods, including but not limited to occupations in government service, diplomacy, and transnational advocacy. This track is also suitable for students planning to pursue graduate study in the fields of Global Studies, International Relations, Diplomacy, and Law. Students will pursue an applied social sciences curriculum examining such topics as world affairs, geopolitics, environmental issues, technological innovation, industrialization, economic interdependence, international trade, and cultural, social and political change around the globe.

  • Seven courses (21 credits) in one of the following disciplines: History, Geography, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, or Politics
  • Four courses (12 credits) in a secondary field from one of the above listed disciplines, Philosophy, or Business Management (School of Business)
  • Five STS Perspectives Electives (15 credits), including at least two courses at the 300 level; representative courses in Global Affairs include (others with permission of Department Chair):

ANT 210—Anthropology and Globalization

HIS 305—Culture and Technology in England

HIS 341—Terrorism and the Modern World

MLG 305—Hispanic Culture and Latin American Civilization

MLG 308—Arabic Culture and Civilization

POL 371—Geopolitics

SOC 350—Global Social Change

PSY 304—Multicultural Psychology

Media Studies

The Media Studies concentration prepares students for career paths dependent on a critical understanding of the rapidly changing nature of mass media and information and communication technologies (ICTs), including but not limited to occupations in the cultural industries (film, TV, music, radio, etc.), new media companies, political communication, and corporate/media relations. This track is also suitable for students planning to pursue graduate study in the fields of Media or Cultural Studies, as well as certain Area Studies programs. Students will pursue an applied social sciences/humanities curriculum examining such topics as media studies, cultural exchange, political identity, immigration and multiculturalism, intercultural communication, the evolution of media platforms, and issues of gender, ethnicity, and race.

  • Seven courses (21 credits) in one of the following disciplines: History, Geography, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, English, Modern Languages, or Politics
  • Four courses (12 credits) in a secondary field from one of the above listed disciplines, Philosophy, Psychology, Business Management, Computer Systems, Sport Management, or Visual Communications (School of Business)
  • Five STS Perspectives Electives (15 credits), including at least two courses at the 300 level; representative courses in Media Studies include (others with permission of Department Chair):

BCS 130—Website Development

ECO 320—Internet and Network Economics

EGL 308—The City in Literature, Art, Film and Theatre

EGL 311—Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media

POL 320—Internet Politics

POL 391—Mass Media and Politics

SMT 220—Media and Sport

Environmental Policy

The Environmental Policy concentration prepares students for policy-related career paths in the evolving realm of “green” technologies, renewable energy, sustainable development, and the protection of ecosystems. This track is also suitable for students planning to pursue graduate study in the fields of Environmental Studies, Public Policy, and International Development. Students will pursue an applied social sciences curriculum examining such topics as ecology, climate change, environmental policy-making, energy sustainability, ethics in the global sphere, green technologies, and regulatory issues.

  • Seven courses (21 credit hours) in a single discipline within the Social Sciences (History, Geography, Sociology, Economics, Anthropology, Psychology, or Politics) or Physics
  • Four courses (12 credits) in a secondary field from one of the above listed disciplines, Mathematics, Philosophy, or in Environmental Sciences (School of Engineering) or Horticulture (School of Business)
  • Five STS Perspectives Electives (15 credits), including at least two courses at the 300 level; representative courses in Environmental Policy include (others with permission of Department Chair):

BIO 353—Essentials of Plant Pathology

BUS 230—Environmental Law

ECO 350—Economics of Global Disasters

ECO 435—Environmental Economics and Policy

ENV 210—Energy and Policy Standards

HIS 320—Europe since the Industrial Revolution

PHI 307— Philosophy of Science and Technology

POL 390—Environmental Politics

Health, Wellness, and Society

The Health, Wellness, and Society concentration prepares students for career paths in a variety of occupations associated with health, medicine, dentistry, nutrition, and well-being, both on the local and international levels. This track is also suitable for students planning to pursue graduate study in the fields of Public Health, Applied Healthcare, and Global Health Policy or degrees/professional programs in Medicine, Dentistry, Medical/Physician’s Assistant, Nutrition, Gerontology, Chiropractic, Holistic/Homeopathic Medicine, Midwife, Acupuncture, or other areas of healthcare. Students will pursue an applied social sciences/natural sciences curriculum examining such topics as nutrition, disease and hygiene, the history of healthcare, alternative approaches to medicine, public policy, and the relationship between the human behavior, the environment, and well-being.

  • Seven courses (21 credit hours) in one of the following disciplines: History, Geography, Sociology, Anthropology, Economics, Psychology, Politics, Physics, Chemistry, or Biology
  • Four courses (12 credits) in a secondary field from one of the above listed disciplines, Philosophy, or Health Studies (School of Health Sciences)
  • Five STS Perspectives Electives (15 credits), including at least two courses at the 300 level; representative courses in Health, Wellness, and Society include (others with permission of Department Chair):

BIO 240—Bioethics

CHM 111—Chemistry and the Public Interest

ECO 310—Health Economics and Policy

HIS 335—Gender and Technology in Historical Perspective

PCM 325— Writing in Health and Disease

SOC 351—Global Health Systems

STS 300—Special Topics in Science, Technology and Society

PSY 328—Introduction to Human Factors

Curriculum Summary

Degree Type: BS
Total Required Credits: 120

Please refer to the General Education, Applied Learning, and Writing Intensive requirement sections of the College Catalog and consult with your advisor to ensure that graduation requirements are satisfied.

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing.

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing.

EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature

This is the second part of the required introductory English composition sequence. This course builds on writing skills developed in EGL 101, specifically the ability to write analytical and persuasive essays and to use research materials correctly and effectively. Students read selections from different literary genres (poetry, drama, and narrative fiction). Selections from the literature provide the basis for analytical and critical essays that explore the ways writers use works of the imagination to explore human experience. Grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

BCS 160 Computers, Society and Technology

This is an introductory course that provides students with the knowledge to stay current and informed in a technology-oriented, global society. Students will receive instruction in basic computer concepts and terminology, the fundamentals of the Windows operating system and have hands-on experience at the beginning to intermediate level using Microsoft Excel and Access. The Internet will be used to supplement textbook and lecture materials. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for BCS 102 or 202.

HIS 212 Modern World

Analyzes the impact of technology on the major political movements and governmental systems of the modern world since 1900. The course will examine the effects of technology on war, culture, ideology and the future.

ENV 101 Energy Sustainability and Environment

This is an introductory course to create and enhance the critical awareness of the student regarding various forms of energy, sustainability issues and the impact on the environment through unbridled use of energy in the present day context. A scientific and technological approach is used to discuss various topics. The knowledge base of this course is derived from certain natural sciences such as Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Eco-Science. The main topics of discussion are: Forms of energy, energy conservation, impact on the environment by the use of energy, forms of renewable energy and sustainability issues. The critical policy issues related to energy are also discussed. The course prepares the student to be a fully aware citizen on energy issues facing the community and the world.

GIS 222 Geovisualization I

Geographic information systems (GIS) are computer systems designed for the creation, storage, retrieval, analysis, and visualization of spatial data. GIS is applied across fields as diverse as urban planning, environmental management, law enforcement, industrial location, and marketing, and for scientific research in many disciplines. This course is a hands-on course with a required lab period which will introduce students to foundational concepts and skills in working with spatial data, including finding and creating data, spatial analysis, and GIS-based map production. This course is a prerequisite for several upper-level GEO courses. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101, GEO 110 Corequisite(s): GIS 221L

SOC 245 Technology, Society and Social Change

This course explores the ways in which science, technology, and society create social change. The focus is on the varying benefits, costs, and consequences of these changes across historical eras and cultures. This course carries a hands-on computer component as a requirement. Prerequisite(s): One course in social science

STS 400W Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society (Writing Intensive)

The Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society is a capstone course for those students intending to graduate from the Science, Technology, & Society (STS) program. Students will participate in a reading and writing-intensive seminar organized around a common theme in the sciences and technologies, exploring how social, political, and cultural values affect the production and dissemination of knowledge and the development and use of new technologies. Students in the seminar will be required to complete a substantial research project integrating what they have learned during their course of study and their specific areas of interest. Students should consult the department before registering for any seminar course. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for STS 400 and 400W; STS 400W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Science, Technology, & Society Department Prerequisite(s): Senior status in STS program and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher.

STS 401W Internship in Science, Technology, & Society (Writing Intensive)

This course is designed for Science, Technology, & Society (STS) majors who wish to complete a semester-long (or equivalent) internship as part of their course of study. Students may choose an internship at a corporation or a civic, educational, governmental, or not-for- profit organization after consultation with and permission of the department chair. Any internship should support learning outcomes and/or career development in the sciences, technology, and/or society. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students with senior status in the STS Program. Students enrolled in an internship will meet periodically with their advisor and will be required to submit internship notes and both a draft and final report of the internship experience at the end of the semester. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for STS 401 and 401W; STS 401W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Science, Technology, & Society Department Prerequisite(s): Senior status in STS program and approval of Department Chair and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher.

STS 400W Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society (Writing Intensive)

The Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, & Society is a capstone course for those students intending to graduate from the Science, Technology, & Society (STS) program. Students will participate in a reading and writing-intensive seminar organized around a common theme in the sciences and technologies, exploring how social, political, and cultural values affect the production and dissemination of knowledge and the development and use of new technologies. Students in the seminar will be required to complete a substantial research project integrating what they have learned during their course of study and their specific areas of interest. Students should consult the department before registering for any seminar course. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for STS 400 and 400W; STS 400W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Science, Technology, & Society Department Prerequisite(s): Senior status in STS program and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher.

ANT 210 Modern Anthropology and Globalization

Cultural change and the social processes involved are major areas of cultural anthropological research. By introducing students to the application of anthropological methodologies such as field work and cross-cultural comparison, the course examines some of the major issues which confront human beings in a complex rapidly growing and changing world including: globalization, migration and immigration, population changes, social conflict, agricultural/technological development, nutrition, commodity/cultural exchange, and the future of small scale homogeneous societies. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level social science or business course.

HIS 305 Culture and Technology in England

This course is a multidisciplinary examination of the ways in which technology affected everyday life during the Industrial Revolution in England. Covering the years 1750 to 1880, it examines the changes taking place in technology during the period; how these changes ultimately affected the workplace, the home, and the community and how novelists of the period felt about these changes. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HUM 305 or SOC 305. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 and One social science course or HIS 114 and HIS 115.

HIS 341 Terrorism and the Modern World

This course traces the global impact of terror and terrorism since the first use of the term in 1795. Much of the course focuses on the use of political violence by non-state actors and revolutionary organizations operating both at a domestic and international level. We will compare and contrast the various "waves" of terror which have gripped the globe since the late 1800s and analyze the similarities and differences between groups such as the IRA, the Ku Klux Klan, and al Qaeda. We will also explore state-based terror, specifically the use of fear, surveillance, and the secret police by various regimes in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of media as an enabler of terrorism and terrorists will also be an important theme throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course or EGL 102.

MLG 305 Hispanic and Latin American Culture and Civilization

Civilization course: Provides a general perspective on the formation of the Latin American Culture through the centuries, with special emphasis on Spanish America. In parallel form, historical and cultural evolution of the New World and the Iberian Peninsula will be studied, from their beginnings up to the present. Among other aspects, the course will give special attention to the rich multicultural heritage which has been maintained in Latin America through the centuries, as well as its achievements in Art and Literature. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

MLG 308 Arabic Culture and Civilization

This course examines Arabic culture and civilization through an analysis of historical, educational, social and climatic factors. The course will focus on issues arising out of intra-cultural and intercultural communication with today's economic and socio-political currents focusing on American and Arab relations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

POL 371 Geopolitics

This course examines the strategic, political, and cultural developments and concepts associated with geopolitical from late 19th century through the current era. Combining knowledge of international relations and world geography, students will examine how states and nations interact in an increasingly globalized world. Special topics will include the geopolitics of space, energy, religion, and the environment. Popular media's impact on geopolitics understanding will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course.

SOC 350 Global Social Change

This course examines global social change from a sociological perspective. Specifically, the course focuses on the process of globalization, particularly on the challenges international development poses for developing nations. Specific topics may include global income inequality, global poverty, anti-globalization activism, transnational corporations (e.g. Walmart), and the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. World Trade Organization). Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 and EGL 102.

PSY 304 Multicultural Psychology

Reflecting the 21st century global theme of acculturation, PSY 304 will focus on the ways in which the study and practice of psychology intersect with race, culture, and diversity. Topics include racial/ethnic/religious group differences, cultural norms, gender and sexual orientation issues, family, structure, and identity development. Primary focus will be given to the ways that race and culture contribute to disparities in access to mental health treatment as well as differences in beliefs about mental illness and its treatment. Consistent with an applied psychology approach, the student will develop an understanding of how diversity issues affect the workplace, i.e., discrimination in hiring/firing practices, affirmative action laws, multicultural competence, and sensitivity training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

BCS 130 Website Development I

In this course, students will use both HTML and CSS to modify the appearance of Web page content and layout. Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is a standardized code used to format web pages. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language used for describing the presentation of a document written in a markup language, such as HTML. In addition, students will learn the principles of Responsive Web Design to create an optimal viewing experience irrespective of the device used to display the Web page.

ECO 320 Internet and Network Economics

A study of the economic structure and growth of the modern economy focusing on the effect and impact of emerging technologies on industry, employment, financial markets and market structure. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157

EGL 308 The City In Literature, Art, Film and Theatre

This course examines depictions and interpretations of the city through literature, film, theatre, photography, painting, sculpture and architecture. Initially, the focus will be on New York City, although subsequent semesters, it may extend to other major world cities such as London, Paris, Rome, or Athens. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic value of the different art forms as well as develop the critical vocabulary to help them evaluate the various literary and artistic works. Course work includes assigned readings, field trips to museums in New York City, and extensive use of audio-visual material. Both informal writing (response journals) and more formal papers, including a research paper utilizing primary research (photographs, maps, interviews with artists, slides etc.) and secondary critical and/or historical studies will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 308 and 308W; EGL 308W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

POL 320 Internet Politics

In the developed world, the issue is not whether the Internet affects politics, society, culture and commerce, but rather how and why it does and to what consequences. How do we comprehend the tensions, contradictions, conflicts, paradoxes created by the rapid spreading of the Internet? This course examines the impact of recent communication technologies on the social system, democracy and government, social movements and interactions, markets and commerce, globalization and governance, and the relations between culture and the state. This course focuses on the intersections among politics, society and commerce through a comparative perspective and asks students to evaluate the central controversial policy dilemmas and problems that have emerged and persisted over the Internet. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level higher HIS or POL course.

POL 391 Mass Media and Politics

This course provides a comprehensive survey of mass media's role in politics and the impact of the political environment on the press. It investigates the major media platforms (print, radio, television and the Internet) and how each shapes political culture. While the scope of the course is global, much attention is paid to the American media landscape. Other regions to be covered include the former Soviet Union, the Arab World, East Asia, and Europe. Special topics to be explored include: news management, transnational media empires, the CNN effect, infotainment, "fake news," the mass mediation of terrorism, and the connection between media and democracy. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 or higher level HIS or POL course.

SMT 220 Media and Sport

The course will begin by tracing the history of sport media in the United States beginning with the reporting of early American sports via newspapers, through the radio and television ages, the role cable television played in expanding sports viewership, ending with an analysis of regional sports networks, social media and the on-line streaming of sports. The course will examine the role the Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961 has played in shaping modern media rights contracts including its influence on rights fees and coverage. Additional topics include managing talent and production staff, examining commercial pressures on both athletes and sport properties, and the global sport media expansion so the students can examine current problems while analyzing possible solutions. Prerequisite(s): SMT 110 with a grade of 'C' or higher

BIO 353 Essentials of Plant Pathology

The study of the development of plant diseases caused by Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Virolds. Major diseases of economically important plants are emphasized. The disease process and disease cycles for representative pathogens are covered in relation to plant disease control methods. Prerequisite(s): BIO 192 with a grade of C- or higher and Junior Status. Corequisite(s): BIO 354L

BUS 230 Environmental Law

This elective course addresses concerns pertaining to the business environment, instructing students as to the unified ecological approach to which affect management. The political approach to business environmental concerns in the context of constitutional, common law and administrative law theories and case and statutory analysis are examined, referencing basic natural science technology. Designed as a first law course it introduces the business, horticulture and industrial technology student to the legal process applying relevant components of environmental law studies. A nationally adopted text of a major law publisher and contemporary business periodical articles on assigned topics are to be used extensively.

ECO 350 Economics of Global Disasters

This course focuses on the inter-relationship between natural and manmade hazards and disasters and the economy. Disasters within the economic and sociology literature arise when an event impacts the physical, social and economic infrastructure beyond its normal absorptive capacity. Topics covered and examined include natural hazards and their effects on regional development, manmade disasters, methods of hazard analysis, impact estimation techniques, and disaster planning and mitigation, public policy and issues. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and ECO 157

ECO 435 Environmental Economics and Policy

This course provides a survey of the fundamental concepts underlying economic approaches to environmental policy, illustrates applications of these concepts in the real world and offers students the opportunity to apply their new knowledge toward understanding a current environmental problem. Prerequisite(s): (ECO 260 or ECO 262) and (ECO 255 or ECO 270)

ENV 210 Energy Policy and Standards

This course gives an introduction to energy policy at various levels like the local governments, state and federal governments. Role of Public Service Commission, Inter and intra state energy markets, environmental laws as policy tools for energy generation and distribution are also topics of discussion. Influence of NGOs in shaping the energy policy is discussed. Topics like renewable portfolio standard, feed-in-tariff, distributed generation and its challenges etc. are included. Case studies involving local utilities will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENV 101

HIS 320 Europe Since the Industrial Revolution

This course examines European history from the period of the Industrial Revolution to the present. Special focus will be placed on how scientific and technological developments impacted politics, society, and culture in Europe and the West more generally. The histories of individual European nation-states will be discussed, as well as major revolutions, periods of intense social change, and the two world wars. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course.

PHI 307 Philosophy of Science and Technology

A philosophical overview of developments in science and technology, showing their impact on general culture. Some highlights include the early separation of religion and philosophy, the role of mathematics in culture, the beginnings of modern science in the works of Galileo, Descartes, Leibniz and Newton, and contemporary revolutions in science and technology. Prerequisite(s): One semester of science and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

POL 390 Environmental Politics

This course examines the evolution of the environmental movement in the U.S. and worldwide, focusing on the debate over environmental protection, policy-making, and the political ramifications for the national governments. Biodiversity, climate change, population issues, water pollution, regulation of emissions, land preservation, energy policy, transnational cooperation, eco-terrorism, and theories of the global commons will all be explored from a domestic and global perspective. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course.

BIO 240 Bioethics

This course will cover ethical issues raised as a result of modern advances in biotechnology which directly affect the quality of human life. Bioethics comprises every possible aspect of health care: medical, moral, political, religious, legal and financial. It scrutinizes outmoded laws and deals with the enormous growth in available medical services. It takes into account our views of ourselves as members of a humane society. Note: This course is also offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the department. Students cannot get credit for BIO 240 and BIO 240W. Prerequisite(s): One course of college biology with a C- or higher; for the writing intensive version, EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher is also required.

CHM 111 Chemistry and the Public Interest

An abridged course in General Chemistry which presents the ideas and methods of chemical science in a qualitative and conceptual fashion. This course assumes no previous science background and will emphasize the fundamentals of measurement, atomic theory, bonding, solutions, acids and bases, salts, equations, chemical arithmetic and energy transfer. Illustrations and applications of concepts will be drawn from everyday life. (This course is intended to fulfill the science requirements of non-science majors and is NOT OPEN to science, health science, or pre-health majors). Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015

ECO 310 Health Economics and Policy

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the application of economic thinking to the analysis of health policy and health systems. Specifically, we will survey the organization, financing and delivery of health services, the economic evaluation of alternative methods of providing health care, priority setting and resource allocation and the health behaviors of individuals. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 and junior level status

HIS 335 Gender and Technology in Historical Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the connections between gender roles and technology from comparative and historical perspectives. Studying the past in this way sheds light on key global issues today. How does technology shape feminine and masculine identities in the developed world? What happens to preconceived notions of gender relations and gender identities when the developed world and developing world come into contact? This course focuses on the interaction between technology and gender in the age of globalization and is intended to be interdisciplinary and may begin with a dash of sociology or anthropology, dissecting gender roles in our world today. It will also examine the historical connections between gender roles and technology specifically in the United States. At the discretion of the instructor, topics to investigate may include the function of gender and technology in European exploration, European imperialism, and U.S. expansion. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course.

PCM 325 Writing in Health and Disease

Students will develop skill in articulating oral and written health information for multiple audiences. The course emphasizes how to interpret medical studies, how to think critically about ethical issues in the health sciences, and how to assess communication problems between medical professionals and the communities they serve. Nutritional guidelines and food politics also are explored in depth. Using appropriate research methods, students will practice several expository forms common in health professions, such as patient instructions and articles. Students also will write a personal essay and public service announcement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102

SOC 351 Global Health Systems

This course examines and compares healthcare systems from a sociological perspective in post-industrialized, transitional, and developing societies. Students are required to complete an original research paper/project. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122 or SOC 223 or SOC 228 and EGL 102.

STS 300 Special Topics: Science, Technology, & Society

This course offers instruction in special content areas that explore the intersection of scientific and technological advances, politics, culture, and society. Interdisciplinary in nature, Special Topics in Science, Technology, & Society will investigate contemporary issues such as ecology and environmental sustainability, the spread of information and communication technologies, privacy and surveillance, new technologies of war, and bioethics, among other fields of inquiry. This course will require extensive reading and research, focused on the selected topic. Students should consult the department before registering for any Special Topics course. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher SOC, HIS, or POL course.

PSY 328 Introduction to Human Factors

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human factors psychology. Human factors psychology is the application of the body of scientific facts about human characteristics to the design, operation and organization of human machine systems. Human-machine systems can range from simple consumer products to complex arrangements of hardware, software and personnel, such as aviation systems. Human factors knowledge, methods and techniques will be surveyed with an emphasis on ensuring that the systems, equipment, personnel tasks and work environment are compatible with the human sensory, perceptual, cognitive and physical attributes of the personnel who function within the human machine system. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.