Collage: Gloved forensic examination of computer pieces. Fingerprint and data background. Female and male student working on an iPad.

Security Systems

Bachelor of Science Degree
The Bachelor of Science degree program in Security Systems is designed to provide students with an understanding of the applications of security technology.  The majority of classes are offered in a lab environment where students receive hands-on experience with both the hardware and software tools to protect digital information, digital systems, and related physical resources from malicious attacks.  Specifically, the curriculum focuses on the following areas:

  • Computer security: information security, cryptography, biometrics, malware protection.
  • Computer forensics: digital evidence, data investigation.
  • Network security: access control, intrusion detection, network defense.
  • Physical security: surveillance systems, infrastructure protection.
  • Security policies: incident response, security management.

Emphasis is placed on providing students with the skills required to implement effective and comprehensive information security controls.  Two concentrations are offered within the program for students to choose from:

  •  Network: network analysis courses offer the students eligibility for CISCO Certified Network Associate (CCNA) test.
  • Transportation: aviation courses prepares the students for airport security operations.

 Highly skilled security personnel are sought after in many industries to ensure protection across systems.  Graduates of the program will enter into employment  fields such as database services/security, operating systems administration, information policy, and security administration.

Typical Employment Opportunities

Corporate Security
Federal, State and Local Security Agencies
Security Administrator
Security Analyst
Digital Investigator
Information Security Officer

Security Systems (BS) Program Outcomes:

  • Graduates will have knowledge of advanced computer-based evidentiary and “discovery” data methods and will be technically competent to administer procedures for evidence identification, documentation, and chain of custody maintenance.

  • Graduates will have knowledge to develop comprehensive computer security programs for organizations.

  • Graduates will have knowledge to develop protection programs for organizations using an integrated security systems approach.

  • Graduates will have an appreciation and understanding of the necessity for personal integrity, professional ethics, and cultural awareness.

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

Computer Security

Dr. M. Nazrul Islam
Lupton Hall, Room 102
934-420-2538
sst@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Liberal Arts and Sciences (61 credits)
EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing (GE) 3
EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature 3
PSY 101 Intro to Psychology (GE) 3
SOC 122 Intro to Sociology (GE) 3
Foreign Language (GE) 3
The Arts (GE) 3
MTH 110 Statistics (GE) 3
Natural Science with a Lab (GE) 4
American/Other World/Western Civilization History (GE) 3
Humanities (GE) 3
Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives* 30

*Note: The Liberal Arts and Science electives must include:

1. At least 3 credits in General Education
2. At least 9 credits in the Social Sciences
3. At least 12 credits of 200 or higher level courses

Required Courses in the Major (55 credits)
CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
SST 115 Computer Forensics 3
CRJ 200 Criminal Investigation 3
SST 217 Computer Forensics II 3
SST 218 Computer Forensics III 3
SST 230 Biometrics and Identity Theft 3
SST 310 Computer Security I 3
SST 311 Computer Security II 3
SST 312 Computer Security III 3
SST 314 Security Law and Policy 3
SST 323 Network Defense 3
SST 410W Senior Project 3
SST 420 Physical Security I 4
SST 421 Physical Security II 3

Free Electives (6 Credits)

Network Concentration (12 Credits)

BCS 208 Networking Fundamentals I 3
BCS 209 Networking Fundamentals II 3
BCS 320 Scaling Networks 3
BCS 321 Connecting Networks 3

OR

Transportation Security (12 Credits)

AVN 280 Intro to Air Cargo Operations-Basic 3
AVN 300W Government in Aviation 3
AVN 400 Aviation Law 3
AVN 417 Homeland Security in Aviation 3
Total Credits: 122

Curriculum Summary

Degree Type: BS
Total Required Credits: 122

Please refer to the General Education, Applied Learning, and Writing Intensive requirement sections of the College Catalog and consult with your advisor to ensure that graduation requirements are satisfied.

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing.

EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature

This is the second part of the required introductory English composition sequence. This course builds on writing skills developed in EGL 101, specifically the ability to write analytical and persuasive essays and to use research materials correctly and effectively. Students read selections from different literary genres (poetry, drama, and narrative fiction). Selections from the literature provide the basis for analytical and critical essays that explore the ways writers use works of the imagination to explore human experience. Grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed to present basic psychological concepts and to introduce students to the scientific study of behavior. Core topics include methods of psychological research, the biological bases of behavior, principles of learning, memory and cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Other selected topics to be covered would include the following: motivation and emotion, life-span development, social psychology, health psychology, sensation and perception, intelligence, human sexuality, statistics, and altered states of consciousness.

SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the field of sociology. In addition to learning about the central concepts and major theoretical sociological perspectives, students study human behavior in groups, the organization of social life, the impact of social institutions on individuals, and the process of sociological research. Great emphasis is also placed upon development of students’ “sociological imagination” – specifically, the ability to understand the ways that our individual lives are shaped by larger social forces and institutions. Note: Students who take SOC 122 may not receive credit for SOC 122W.

MTH 110 Statistics

Basic concepts of probability and statistical inference. Included are the binominal, normal, and chi-square distributions. Practical applications are examined. Computer assignments using Minitab form an integral part of the course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015

CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

In this introductory course, the roots of the criminal justice system will be explored, along with the specific processes of law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The understanding of Supreme Court cases will be connected to these areas of the system. Further understanding will be developed in areas of theory, crime elements and crime trends. Current issues in the criminal justice system will also be discussed.

CRJ 200 Criminal Investigation

Introduction to criminal investigation, technical methods used at the crime scene; development of clues, identification of suspects; criminal investigation procedures including the theory of an investigation; conduct at crime scenes; collection and preservation of physical evidence, analysis of the elements that constitute all crimes. Note: The course may be offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the Criminal Justice Department. Students cannot get credit for both CRJ 200 and CRJ 200W. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 100

BCS 208 Introduction to Networks

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IPv4 and IPv6 addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LAN’s, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience configuring equipment needed to build a LAN. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status

BCS 209 Routing and Switching Essentials

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience configuring routers, switches and basic WAN connectivity. Prerequisite(s): BCS 208 with a grade of C or higher

BCS 320 Scaling Networks

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 320. Prerequisite(s): BCS 209 with a C or higher.

BCS 321 Connecting Networks

This course discusses the Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 321. Prerequisite(s): BCS 209 with a grade of C or higher

AVN 280 Introduction to Air Cargo Operations

The course introduces the student to the growing, technical and multi-faceted air cargo industry. The student will understand the role that air cargo has played in the development of the air carrier industry, contractual and legally binding regulations, and national and international trade. A visit to off-campus air cargo facilities will compliment classroom discussions, lectures and videos. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher or CRJ 100

AVN 400 Aviation Law

Aviation Law develops the student's knowledge to the application level of learning by emphasis on real cases to demonstrate the legal, regulatory and government theory previously discussed in AVN 101and AVN 300. Emphasis will be on the FAA's roles in regulating aviation including the rule making process, certification of airmen, medical certification and enforcement. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or AVN 300W with a grade of C or higher.

AVN 417 Homeland Security in Aviation

This course will expose the student to the importance of Homeland Security in the aviation industry and the important role each employee in the industry is charged with. Students will gain experience in identifying false travel documents and identifying suspicious air travelers. This course will focus on current national security threats in the aviation industry. Upon the successful completion of this course the students will meet the requirements of the initial and recurrent security training requirements mandated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) under Title 49 CFR 1552. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or 300W with a grade of C or higher.

Last Modified 9/24/20