Applied Psychology

Bachelor of Science Degree

The Applied Psychology program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. The program focuses on developing the student’s ability to use the core knowledge and analytical skills of the discipline in order to address practical problems important to local business and industry. This program prepares students to be real-life problem solvers in the emerging field of Applied Psychology. Students will learn the foundations of Industrial/Organizational Psychology including personnel management, organizational behavior, and organizational development. The program’s career objectives are to prepare students for meaningful and rewarding entry-level positions in business and human resource management. This “hands on” program will develop skills that will enable its graduates to help businesses efficiently recruit, develop, and organize their human resources. Commensurate with the expectations of a BS in Applied Psychology and the current requirements of entry-level jobs in the area of Industrial/Organizational Psychology, students will successfully complete an applied research project or an internship. Furthermore, if the program graduates’ educational aspirations include advanced professional training, they will have had the theoretical knowledge, analytical skills, and exposure to effective writing necessary for successful entry and performance in the increasingly competitive and specialized graduate programs across many fields of psychology.

Applied Psychology (BS) Program Outcomes:

  • Graduates will have the knowledge and skill to successfully conduct and report research in Applied Psychology.
  • Graduates will demonstrate technical competence with regard to general psychological concepts and theories as well as the content and technologies of Applied Psychology.
  • Graduates will possess the competencies required to perform entry level positions in business and human resource management.

In addition to curricular options, the College has a vibrant Psychology Club and an honor society (Psi Chi).

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Psychology | Dr. Marya Howell-Carter, Chair | psychology@farmingdale.edu | 934-420-2725

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Liberal Arts and Sciences (63-64 credits)
EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing (GE) 3
EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature 3
Humanities (GE) 3
SPE 130 Public Speaking

OR

SPE 202 Interpersonal Communications (GE) 3
The Arts (GE) 3
American/Other World/Western Civilization History (GE) 3
MTH 116 College Algebra (GE) 4
MTH 110 Statistics (GE) 3
Foreign Language - Level II (GE) 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (GE) 3
SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology 3
EGL 310 Technical Writing 3
BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications 3
Social Science (non-Psychology) electives 6
Math/Science elective by advisement 3-4
Biology with lab (GE) 4
Biology elective with lab 4
Liberal Arts and Sciences electives 6
Psychology Core (32 credits)
PSY 234 Social Psychology 3
PSY 301 Learning 3
PSY 348 Statistics for Psychology 4
PSY 360 Research Methods in Psychology 4
PSY 372 Cognitive Psychology 3
Any 200 level or higher Psychology (PSY) course by advisement OR RAM 303 by advisement 15
Industrial/Organizational Psychology Concentration (15 credits)
PSY 311W Organizational Behavior 3
PSY 331 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3
PSY 414 Applied Personnel Psychology 3
PSY 442 Applied Psychology Senior Project: Professional Development 3
PSY 443 Applied Psychology Senior Project II: Career Planning 3
Free Electives 12
Total Credits: 122-123

Curriculum Summary

Degree Type: BS
Total Required Credits: 122-123

Please refer to the General Education, Applied Learning, and Writing Intensive requirement sections of the College Catalog and consult with your advisor to ensure that graduation requirements are satisfied.

Notes:
The Bachelor’s Degree in Applied Psychology does not lead to licensure. All licensure in Psychology in New York State requires an advanced (Master’s or Doctoral) degree.

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing.

EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature

This is the second part of the required introductory English composition sequence. This course builds on writing skills developed in EGL 101, specifically the ability to write analytical and persuasive essays and to use research materials correctly and effectively. Students read selections from different literary genres (poetry, drama, and narrative fiction). Selections from the literature provide the basis for analytical and critical essays that explore the ways writers use works of the imagination to explore human experience. Grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

SPE 130 Public Speaking

This course prepares students in the following areas of effective expository and persuasive public speaking: audience analysis; topic selection; appropriate use and documentation of supporting material; organization and outlining techniques; aspects of delivery which include appropriate eye contact, posture, use of notes, elements of voice such as rate and volume, and the use of presentational visual aids. Group discussion and problem solving exercises will also be provided, and students will engage in peer feedback throughout the course.

SPE 202 Interpersonal Communications

An Introduction to effective interpersonal communication skills covering areas such as effective and active listening, feedback techniques, the effects of self-concept and perception in daily communications, and non-verbal and cross-cultural communication. These skills will be developed through class lectures, group exercises, and individual activities and assignments. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

MTH 116 College Algebra

This course is designed to provide students with a firm foundation in symbolic manipulation and algebraic reasoning. Both manipulative skills and conceptual understanding of algebraic principles are stressed. Topics include equivalent expressions and equations, linear functions, properties of exponents and logarithms, quadratic equations, power functions, exponential functions. Upon completion of this course students will be prepared for precalculus as well as for quantitative courses in the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015

MTH 110 Statistics

Basic concepts of probability and statistical inference. Included are the binominal, normal, and chi-square distributions. Practical applications are examined. Computer assignments using Minitab form an integral part of the course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed to present basic psychological concepts and to introduce students to the scientific study of behavior. Core topics include methods of psychological research, the biological bases of behavior, principles of learning, memory and cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Other selected topics to be covered would include the following: motivation and emotion, life-span development, social psychology, health psychology, sensation and perception, intelligence, human sexuality, statistics, and altered states of consciousness.

SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the field of sociology. In addition to learning about the central concepts and major theoretical sociological perspectives, students study human behavior in groups, the organization of social life, the impact of social institutions on individuals, and the process of sociological research. Great emphasis is also placed upon development of students’ “sociological imagination” – specifically, the ability to understand the ways that our individual lives are shaped by larger social forces and institutions. Note: Students who take SOC 122 may not receive credit for SOC 122W.

EGL 310 Technical Writing

A detailed study of the fundamentals of writing technical reports and other technical communications. Topics emphasized include the elements of a technical report, the interpretation of statistics and data, and the composition of letters, memos, and informal reports containing technical information. Assignments and student exercises are drawn from the student's technical area. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications

This is an introductory course in the use of personal computers in today's society. Students will receive instruction in basic computer concepts and terminology, the fundamentals of the Windows operating system and have hands on experience at the beginning to intermediate level using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The Internet will be used to supplement textbook and lecture materials. Note: Computer Systems students cannot use BCS 102 to meet a BCS Elective requirement.

PSY 234 Social Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of how people influence each other. Topics to be covered include: liking and loving, aggression and violence, obedience and compliance, helping in emergencies, attitudes, prejudice and sexism. In addition, social perception and group behavior will be examined. Prerequisite(s):PSY 101.

PSY 301 Learning

This course examines the principles and theories of learning including the methodology and evaluation of research pertaining to learning processes. Topics will include a broad range of learning paradigms, from relatively simple processes such as classical conditioning and operant conditioning, to more cognitively complex processes such as concept formation and schema development. The research describing information acquisition, transfer, and forgetting will be reviewed. In addition, the influence of conditions such as motivational factors, will be examined. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

PSY 348 Statistics for Psychology

This course will examine the basic descriptive and inferential statistics used in the behavioral and social sciences. Topics will include the organization of data, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, hypothesis testing, and various parametric and nonparametric tests of significance including t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square analysis. In the computer lab component, students will focus on the interconnections between theory, statistical techniques, and research methods in order to identify the appropriate statistical tests to analyze data and reach objective conclusions regarding research questions in the social sciences. Computer lab sessions will also provide practice in using statistical software for data summarization, presentation, and analysis. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101, MTH 110 and Junior level status

PSY 360 Research Methods

This course will present the scientific method within the context of applied psychology. Research techniques and methods will be examined for the formulation of hypotheses, development of testable objectives, experimental design, subject selection, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and report preparation. This course will focus on laboratory based methods and simple statistical procedures for the analysis of data. Students will apply the concepts and methods in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s): PSY 348

PSY 372 Cognitive Psychology

This course covers the psychological study of human information processing in terms of structure, process, and application. The representation of knowledge in memory is addressed as is the cognitive processes used for information acquisition, information retrieval, and forgetting. The cognitive processes of attention, pattern recognition, language, comprehension, and thinking will be reviewed in terms of their application to cognitive activities such as decision-making, reasoning, problem solving, and creativity. The application of cognitive theory to artificial intelligence is also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and any 200-level PSY course.

RAM 303 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals.

PSY 331 Industrial / Organizational Psychology

Students will explore how the science and practice of psychology is applied in the world of work and organizations. Among the topics that will be examined are the history and research methodology of industrial/organizational psychology, job analysis, employee selection, performance evaluation, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, group dynamics, and organizational development. The course will highlight emerging trends in the modern workforce and examine how these changes will impact research and practice in today's organizations. Students will examine the factors influencing cross-cultural diversity and globalization, the theoretical and practical implications of these workforce trends, and how current organizational theories and practices apply to cultures outside of the United States. Implications for the full range of topics discussed in the course will be examined including how cultural diversity and globalization affect employee selection procedures, group dynamics, preferences for leadership, training needs, work motivation, and organizational development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

PSY 414 Applied Personnel Psychology

This upper level offering is designed to provide students with the tools for understanding the underlying theory, research and techniques of personnel psychology. It will provide the background for understanding the practical application of the concepts and techniques studied. This will be accomplished through a combination of lectures, group projects involving application of the principles of personnel psychology, group presentations of the projects and classroom exercise. Prerequisite(s): PSY 331.

PSY 442 Applied Psychology Senior Project: Professional Development

This course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty member's ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and their advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Applied Psychology Bachelor's Program or Permission of Department Chairperson

PSY 443 Applied Psychology Senior Project II:Career Planning

This second Internship-Senior Project course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty members' ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and their advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department Chairperson