Collage of image including a female student preparing a syringe and a group of male and female nursing students in blue and green scrubs.

Nursing

Bachelor of Science Degree

The Nursing program prepares students for entry into the profession of Nursing. Upon graduation, students receive the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Nursing and are eligible to take the National Council of State Board Licensing Exam for RNs (NCLEX-RN).

The curriculum will prepare graduates to provide professional nursing skills to individuals, families and groups in a variety of structured and unstructured healthcare settings, as well as the leadership skills needed to supervise nursing care delivered in community settings. The curriculum offers a balance of courses in general education and nursing. The students are provided with the theoretical knowledge and clinical practice needed to administer care for individuals throughout the life cycle. Graduates are prepared as beginning practitioners to help address the regional need for nurses. Learning experiences take place in the classroom, College nursing laboratory and in a variety of clinical settings. All students are assisted in the development of their potential with guidance offered by faculty who possess broad nursing experience and academic preparation in the field. Students participate in the Student Nurse Association and have opportunities to volunteer through the Department’s Student Nurse Civic Engagement Program.

Advanced Standing status is available.

(All applications submitted for the program by December 15 receive equal consideration.)

The baccalaureate degree in nursing programs at Farmingdale State College, SUNY is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). CCNE is located at 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington DC 20001; phone 202-887-6791 and registered and accredited by the New York State Education Department Office of the Professions.

Typical Employment Opportunities

First level nursing positions in hospitals, home health agencies, long-term facilities, and primary and preventive care throughout the community. 

Nursing (BS) Program Goals:

  • Contribute to meeting current and future health care needs of diverse populations of the region by educating students to provide safe, evidence-based, and patient-centered professional nursing services that reflect ethical clinical judgment and interprofessional collaboration in varied settings.
  • Provide a quality program in nursing education including, activities, and service programs that are supportive of the learning needs of diverse students so that they may accomplish their educational goals and encourage lifelong learning.
  • Use health care technologies, information systems, and technological innovations to create stimulating environments that support and enrich learning and prepare graduates for changes in the health care environment.
  • Provide an environment that supports academic and teaching excellence, scholarly activities, and opportunities for leadership and contributions to the nursing profession.
  • Educate students to become self-aware, ethical, caring, collaborative, and clinically and culturally competent practitioners prepared to engage in nursing as caregivers and leaders.

Nursing (BS) Program Outcomes:

At the completion of the BS nursing program, graduates will:

  • Synthesize knowledge from liberal arts and sciences, humanities and nursing to provide holistic and patient centered care that promotes empowerment and optimal well-being of individuals, families and communities.
  • Practice professional nursing incorporating caring, respect, diversity, integrity, ethics, and the influences of human responses on illness, suffering and healing to assist individuals, families and communities to achieve maximal fulfillment.
  • Demonstrate knowledge, critical thinking, and evidence-based clinical judgments to provide therapeutic nursing care interventions for patients throughout the lifespan, for families and communities with multiple and complex health stressors in a variety of settings.
  • Use effective communication to collaborate with patients, colleagues, and members of the interprofessional health team to improve health care outcomes for patients, families and communities.
  • Incorporate principles of safety, health information technology, organizational and health care systems theory, quality improvement, and political trends in the provision of high quality and safe patient care.
  • Express an identity of self as a bachelor prepared nurse and exhibit professional values and behaviors as described by ethical, legal, and professional standards of practice.
  • Apply leadership, advocacy, and management strategies in multiple settings to advocate for high quality, safe, accessible, and fiscally responsible healthcare.
  • Participate in activities that contribute to advancement of the profession including developing autonomy, advocacy, activism, change, and responsible citizenship.
  • Integrate evidence-based findings, research, and nursing theory in decision making in nursing practice.
  • Engage in self-reflection and life-long learning to maintain competence as a member of the profession and to achieve personal goals for professional development.

Curriculum Patterns

Admission to Farmingdale State College - State University of New York is based on the qualifications of the applicant without regard to age, sex, marital or military status, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or sexual orientation.

Contact Information

Nursing

Dr. Lori Goodstone
Gleeson Hall, Room 204
934-420-2229
nursing@farmingdale.edu
Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm

Fall 2020

Subject to revision

Liberal Arts and Sciences (60 credits)
EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing (GE) 3
EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature 3
BIO 170 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (GE) 4
BIO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (GE) 4
BIO 220 Medical Microbiology 4
BIO 240 Bioethics 3
American/Other World/Western Civilization History (GE) 3
MTH 110 Statistics (GE) 3
Foreign Language – Level II (GE) 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (GE) 3
PSY 232 Child Development 3
SOC 228 Society and Health 3
SPE 202 Interpersonal Communications (GE) 3
The Arts (GE) 3
Humanities (GE) 3
Liberal Arts Elective 12
Required: Nursing (66 credits)
NUR 100 Health Assessment 3
NUR 114 Clinical and Theoretical Foundations of Baccalaureate Nursing Practice 7
NUR 215W Developing Nurses’ Ways of Knowing 3
NUR 216 The Art of Nursing 2
NUR 217 Care of Individuals Experiencing Acute Health Changes 6
NUR 302 Pathophysiology 3
NUR 305 Health Promotion and Patient Education 3
NUR 306 Care of Individuals Experiencing Chronic Health Challenges 6
NUR 307 Nursing Care of Children and the Child Bearing Family 6
NUR 311 Clinical Pharmacology for Nursing 3
NUR 401 Modes of Inquiry 3
NUR 402 Community and Mental Health Nursing 6
NUR 404 Nurse as Advocate and Change Agent 3
NUR 405 Nursing Practicum 9
HST 301 Healthcare Organization 3
Total Credits: 126

To continue in the nursing program a grade of C+ or better must be maintained in all nursing courses. A grade of B or better is required in BIO 170 and BIO 171, and a C is required in BIO 220 to remain in the nursing program.

Curriculum Summary

Degree Type: BS
Total Required Credits: 126

Please refer to the General Education, Applied Learning, and Writing Intensive requirement sections of the College Catalog and consult with your advisor to ensure that graduation requirements are satisfied.

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing.

EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature

This is the second part of the required introductory English composition sequence. This course builds on writing skills developed in EGL 101, specifically the ability to write analytical and persuasive essays and to use research materials correctly and effectively. Students read selections from different literary genres (poetry, drama, and narrative fiction). Selections from the literature provide the basis for analytical and critical essays that explore the ways writers use works of the imagination to explore human experience. Grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

BIO 170 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy and Physiology I are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 170 and BIO 270. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 170L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): High School biology with a lab or BIO 120 or 123 or 130; High School or College chemistry recommended Corequisite(s): BIO 170L

BIO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy and Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems. Note: students may not receive credit for both BIO 171 and BIO 271. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 171L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170 Corequisite(s): BIO 171L

BIO 240 Bioethics

This course will cover ethical issues raised as a result of modern advances in biotechnology which directly affect the quality of human life. Bioethics comprises every possible aspect of health care: medical, moral, political, religious, legal and financial. It scrutinizes outmoded laws and deals with the enormous growth in available medical services. It takes into account our views of ourselves as members of a humane society. Note: This course is also offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the department. Students cannot get credit for BIO 240 and BIO 240W. Prerequisite(s): One course of college biology with a C- or higher; for the writing intensive version, EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher is also required.

MTH 110 Statistics

Basic concepts of probability and statistical inference. Included are the binominal, normal, and chi-square distributions. Practical applications are examined. Computer assignments using Minitab form an integral part of the course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed to present basic psychological concepts and to introduce students to the scientific study of behavior. Core topics include methods of psychological research, the biological bases of behavior, principles of learning, memory and cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Other selected topics to be covered would include the following: motivation and emotion, life-span development, social psychology, health psychology, sensation and perception, intelligence, human sexuality, statistics, and altered states of consciousness.

PSY 232 Child Development

In this course the student will explore human development from preconception through the end of childhood. Course material will include historical and modern concepts of attitudes towards children, theories and models of child development, research methods in the study of children, genetics, prenatal development and influence, pregnancy, and birth. Within each age range the emphasis will be on factors influencing the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child. Developmental disorders, both physical and psychological, will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.

SOC 228 Society and Health

This course examines the meanings and experiences of health and illness and the ways in which social factors like age, gender, class and ethnicity affect health. We explore the historical development of health professions, including alternative health professions. Significant time is also devoted to understanding the workings of the contemporary American healthcare system.

SPE 202 Interpersonal Communications

An Introduction to effective interpersonal communication skills covering areas such as effective and active listening, feedback techniques, the effects of self-concept and perception in daily communications, and non-verbal and cross-cultural communication. These skills will be developed through class lectures, group exercises, and individual activities and assignments. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101

NUR 100 Health Assessment

This course will enable students to acquire skill in obtaining a health history and in performing physical examinations. Emphasis will be on identification of normal physical characteristics, common variations, and beginning skills in detecting deviations from normal. Students are given the opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in the nursing laboratory, and apply these skills to the clinical setting to provide holistic care to individuals and families. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171 with a grade of B or higher Corequisite(s): NUR 100L and NUR 114T, NUR 114L, NUR 114H, NUR 114S

NUR 114 Clinical and Theoretical Foundations of Baccalaureate Nursing Practice

This course provides an introduction to nursing and patient care concepts, emphasizing the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to provide safe, high quality care to individuals, families and communities within a multicultural environment. The theoretical foundation for professional nursing behaviors, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care are explored within the context of various health care environments, delivery systems, and inter-disciplinary teams. Concepts of caring, critical thinking, communication, and the role of the professional nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member of a profession are integrated throughout the course as a framework for presentation of the essential components of generalist baccalaureate nursing practice. Students are given the opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in the nursing and simulation laboratory, and apply these skills in the clinical setting to provide holistic care that promotes optimum wellbeing to individuals and families. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170, 171 Corequisite(s): NUR 114H, 114L, 114S, NUR 100, 100L

NUR 215W Developing Nurses’ Ways of Knowing (Writing Intensive)

This course presents an overview of nursing as a professional, scholarly discipline, which is an essential part of healthcare. Topics discussed include ways of knowing in nursing, specifically theoretical/empirical, ethical, personal, esthetic, intuitive, and sociopolitical knowing. There is also emphasis on developing ideas about related topics such as historical and social factors, reflective practice, nursing concepts, learning, nursing theory, skills acquisition, and evidence for practice that provide foundations for current professional nursing practice. This is a writing intensive course. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Note: Students cannot get credit for NUR 215 and 215W; NUR 215W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Nursing Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher

NUR 216 The Art of Nursing

This course explores the artistry of professional nursing. The theories of caring, the importance of self-care, the mind-body connection, and the value of the nurse’s presence in today’s healthcare system will be explored. The concepts of self-care assessment and intervention will be practiced through reflection and dialogue within an environment of supportive peers and faculty. Other concepts including mindfulness, movement, and personal creativity will be discussed. The evidence supporting the use of therapeutic modalities such as humor, music, and touch will be evaluated for inclusion in a nursing plan of care. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course.

NUR 217 Care of Individuals Experiencing Acute Health Challenges

This course focuses on the experiences of individuals/families with acute health challenges within a multicultural society. The student will be introduced to concepts and skills common in the care of patients with acute health challenges. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and clinical decision making. The student will examine essential concepts and issues related to acute health challenges from different viewpoints. Throughout this course the student continues to develop self-awareness, professionalism, and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to practice nursing in a caring, non-judgmental manner in an increasingly complex health care system. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. To continue in the nursing program, the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 100, NUR 114 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 217H

NUR 302 Pathophysiology

In this course students will examine normal body structure and function as well as concepts related to physiologic deviations that contribute to disease or that occur as a result of a disease, incorporating knowledge from the sciences as a foundation for provision of holistic, patient-centered care. Physiologic changes in body systems that lead to health problems across the lifespan will be addressed in the context of evidence-based research and clinical decision making. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77 %) or better in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 217 with a grade of C+ or higher

NUR 305 Health Promotion and Patient Education

This course combines the critical review of health promotion strategies and the framework for designing successful patient teaching tools. Students will be introduced to the major concepts of health promotion and the issues that impact upon health and wellness. In order to better understand the global impact of health upon our society, students will research various agencies that support health promotion and review their health care agendas. The second component of the course will be an introduction to the role of the nurse as an educator and the identification of barriers to learning will be explored. Methods to develop effective evidenced based teaching plans will also be covered. To continue in the nursing department you must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 215W and NUR 216 with a grade of C+ or higher.

NUR 306 Care of Individual Chronic Health

This course focuses on the experiences of individuals/families with chronic health challenges within a multicultural society. The student will be introduced to concepts and skills common in the care of patients with chronic health challenges. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and clinical decision making. The student will examine essential concepts and issues related to chronic health challenges from different viewpoints. Throughout this course the student continues to develop self-awareness, professionalism, and the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to practice nursing in a caring, non-judgmental manner in an increasingly complex health care system. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 307 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 306H

NUR 307 Nursing Care of Children and the Child Bearing Family

This course builds on the concepts of previous courses with emphasis on the application of the nursing process and the development of critical thinking skills in focusing on health during the childbearing years, antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and the health of infants and children through adolescence. Students will explore the concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, evidence-based health practice, and alterations in health related to patients and families. Emphasis is on common health issues related to maternal-newborn and pediatric specific content. Nursing management and planning will include concepts from culturally diverse settings. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 215W, NUR 216, and NUR 217 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 307H

NUR 311 Clinical Pharmacology-Nursing

This course provides a foundation of basic pharmacology necessary for a nurse in general practice to establish a knowledge base that applies to patient centered care and education. Emphasis is placed on pharmacological concepts that build upon knowledge from the sciences to promote optimal well-being across the lifespan. Pharmacotherapeutic agents used to treat illness, and promote, maintain, and restore wellness are discussed in the context of evidence-based research, clinical judgment, and decision making. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 217 with a grade of C+ or higher, and Junior Status.

NUR 401 Modes of Inquiry in Nursing

This course introduces the student to a comprehensive overview of the nursing research process. Research designs including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches will be examined. Concepts essential for understanding, interpreting, analyzing, and applying research to clinical nursing practice will be emphasized. Students will synthesize research evidence to enhance critical thinking and guide clinical decision-making. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): Any 300 level nursing course with a grade of C+ or higher and MTH 110 with a grade of C or higher.

NUR 402 Community and Mental Health Nursing

The course focuses on both mental health and illness concepts and the role of the nurse in the community working with individuals, families, groups and high-risk populations in a variety of community settings. Caring for individuals across the lifespan including their families and the communities in which they live is emphasized recognizing physical, psychological, behavioral, social and cultural needs. Evidence-based nursing research concepts are incorporated as a basis for community/public health and mental health nursing practice. These concepts focus on individuals and groups with multiple and complex health stressors that exhibit maladaptive patterns and psychiatric disorders. Resources within the global community mental health system are identified. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. This course is for pre-licensure students. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 306 Corequisite(s): NUR 402H

NUR 404 Nurse as Advocate and Change Agent

This course will enable students to synthesize new knowledge and develop a personal perspective on their future professional career in nursing. The current health care environment demands a nursing workforce that is theoretically sound, clinically adept, and politically aware. Topics to be discussed and explored include patient advocacy, political awareness and influence, power and oppression, institutional policy/personal goals, risk management, utilization and audit, and quality assurance. Additional topics may be added in response to new or emerging trends in nursing and health care. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 401

NUR 405 Nursing Practicum: Special Topics

This course will allow the senior nursing student to integrate and apply knowledge from all previous courses. Under the direct supervision of an experienced registered nurse, the student will care for a variety of patients in a health care setting. Concepts including leadership, critical thinking, and quality improvement will be applied in caring for patients, families, and communities to improve healthcare outcomes. Prerequisite(s): NUR 402 and 404 with a grade of C+ or higher Corequisite(s): NUR 405H

HST 301 Health Care Organization

This is a survey course introducing the student to the concepts related to the organization of health care in the United States. Health care will be studied from a historical, political, economic and consumer perspective. Focus will include exploring the commonly used models of health care delivery and organization in the United States and selected other countries. Health Care in this country has undergone tremendous change and expansion since the turn of the last century. As we begin the next century many health care issues remain controversial and a top priority in the minds of many Americans. Access to adequate preventive and episodic health care, organ transplantation and gene therapy are just a few of the interesting topics that will be touched upon. NOTE: Students who take NUR300 cannot receive credit for HST301. NOTE: Students who take HST301 cannot receive credit for NUR300. Prerequisite(s): HST 101 or Permission of the Nursing Department.

BIO 170 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy and Physiology I are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 170 and BIO 270. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 170L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): High School biology with a lab or BIO 120 or 123 or 130; High School or College chemistry recommended Corequisite(s): BIO 170L

BIO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy and Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems. Note: students may not receive credit for both BIO 171 and BIO 271. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 171L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170 Corequisite(s): BIO 171L

Last Modified 9/24/20