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Critically Thinking about Popular Media

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Critically Thinking about Popular Media

Earners of this microcredential will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing and interpreting popular media. Students will learn how popular media imparts meaning by examining their history, evolution, composition, consumption, production, and translation from one format to another. Special attention is paid to how issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion are raised by popular media.

Admission requirements for application:

For Non-matriculated students:

Requirements to achieve the microcredential:

To achieve the Critically Thinking about Popular Media microcredential, students will complete 9 credit hours from any of the following courses: EGL 228 Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture; EGL 240 Themes in Science Fiction Film and Literature; EGL 244 Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature; EGL 266 Fantasy in Literature and Film; and POL 393 Politics & Popular Culture. All prospective students are required to complete the pre-requisite course, EGL 102 with a grade C or higher.

Stackable to:

Science, Technology, and Society B.S.
Professional Communications, B.S.

Time to complete:

3-4 semesters

Cost to attend:

Standard tuition rates apply. For tuition and student consumer information, please click here.

 

Contact Information

English and Humanities

Knapp Hall, 13
934-420-2050
englishandhumanities@farmingdale.edu

Students must complete the following courses:

Basic Coursework (Pick three courses) 3 courses, 9 credits
EGL 228: Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture 3 credits
EGL 240: Themes in Science Fiction Film and Literature 3 credits
EGL 244: Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature 3 credits
EGL 266: Fantasy in Literature and Film 3 credits
POL 393: Politics & Popular Culture 3 credits

EGL 228 Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture

This course presents a cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary examination of the meaning and value of such myths as those of the creation, the flood, and the hero, and their depiction in literature, art, film, and music from the ancient past to the present. Students will acquire an understanding of the uses of mythical themes and archetypes both in ancient art and literature as well as in modern art, literature, and film. Course work includes assigned readings, film screenings, informal journals, a formal paper and exams. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

EGL 266 Fantasy in Literature and Film

Fantasy in Literature and Film examines not only the oldest literary genre but one that continues to fascinate readers old and young and to inspire some of the most innovative and technically sophisticated films. Works of fantasy overlap other genres: myth, fairy tales, epic sagas, tales of the grotesque, juvenilia, adventure stories, and some science fiction. However, fantasy is the study of what can never actually be real, that is, what we dream about or can only imagine. Readings include traditional works of fantasy from the earliest recorded texts as well as beloved children's and young adult "classics" of this genre. Film adaptations as well as original films in this genre will also be analyzed and critiqued. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher

POL 393 Politics and Popular Culture

This course examines the influence of popular culture on political identity within the United States and across the globe. The relationship between the U.S. entertainment industry and the political system will be explored, while the second half of the course will focus on the impact of global popular culture on international relations. Various forms of pop culture will be addressed, including but not limited to: film, television, music, video games, novels, comics, political cartoons, jokes, blogging, fads, and fashion. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level or higher HIS, POL or GEO course.

Last Modified 2/21/24