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Open Access

Articles and Databases

Search databases to find articles in peer-reviewed journals, magazines, newspapers, reference sources, and other publications. Access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Search Everything
Use the "Search Everything" tab on the Library’s homepage to search across all library collections, including books, ebooks, journals, magazines, newspapers, and other publications.

Academic Search Complete
Articles from academic journals, newspapers, and magazines useful for many subjects. A great place to get started with research.

Cabell’s Scholarly Analytics
Data specialists hand-source and evaluate every journal included in the Cabells database using a comprehensive set of selection criteria. Each entry displays contact information, manuscript and submission guidelines, and actionable metrics to give you the confidence you need to make informed decisions.

Digital Commons Network
The Digital Commons Network brings together free, full-text scholarly articles from hundreds of universities and colleges worldwide. Curated by university librarians and their supporting institutions, the Network includes a growing collection of peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, dissertations, working papers, conference proceedings, and other original scholarly work.

Directory of Open Access Journals
Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) DOAJ is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals.

Proquest Research Library
Articles from academic journals, trade publications, and magazines across many subjects, including business.

Books

Textbooks

Search for textbooks by course number via this list of textbooks on reserve. Also search by title in the Library's catalog. Request textbooks at the Circulation Desk. Use these books for up to two hours in the Library. Call numbers are designated by course number, e.g. BUS 101.

Print Books

Search for books in the Library's catalog. Also find print materials via the "Books and eBooks" tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc.

  • Circulating Books: Located on the Lower Level. Check out up to 10 books for 2 weeks at a time with your FSC ID
  • Reference Books: Located on the First Floor. Must be used within the Library. Includes encyclopedias, handbooks, dictionaries, test prep books, etc.

eBooks

Search for ebooks via the "Books and eBooks" tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc. View materials as a PDF and access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Books and eBooks about Open Access
This pre-set search will allow you to browse the books and ebooks about Open Access at Greenley Library.

Websites

Berlin Declaration
The Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities of 22 October 2003 was written in English. It is one of the milestones of the Open Access movement.

Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing
The following statements of principle were drafted during a one-day meeting held on April 11, 2003 at the headquarters of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The purpose of this document is to stimulate discussion within the biomedical research community on how to proceed, as rapidly as possible, to the widely held goal of providing open access to the primary scientific literature. Our goal was to agree on significant, concrete steps that all relevant parties —the organizations that foster and support scientific research, the scientists that generate the research results, the publishers who facilitate the peer-review and distribution of results of the research, and the scientists, librarians and other who depend on access to this knowledge— can take to promote the rapid and efficient transition to open access publishing.

Budapest Open Access Initiative
On December 1-2, 2001, the Open Society Institute (OSI) called a meeting in Budapest of leading proponents of open access for scientific and scholarly journal literature. The goal was to see how far the many current initiatives could assist one another and how OSI could use its resources to help the cause.

The Hague Declaration  
The Hague Declaration aims to foster agreement about how to best enable access to facts, data and ideas for knowledge discovery in the Digital Age. By removing barriers to accessing and analyzing the wealth of data produced by society, we can find answers to great challenges such as climate change, depleting natural resources and globalization.

Harvard Open Access Project (HOAP)
HOAP launched in 2011 to foster open access (OA) within Harvard, foster OA beyond Harvard, undertake research and policy analysis on OA, and provide OA to timely and accurate information about OA itself.

Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles
Data should be considered legitimate, citable products of research. Data citation, like the citation of other evidence and sources, is good research practice and is part of the scholarly ecosystem supporting data reuse. In support of this assertion, and to encourage good practice, Force11 offers a set of guiding principles for data within scholarly literature, another dataset, or any other research object.

Open Speakers Database 
The Open Speakers Database is a crowd-sourced database of regional experts on Open Access, Open Education and Open Data, put together by the Right to Research Coalition and OpenCon.

 

SHERPA RoMEO
SHERPA RoMEO is an online resource that aggregates and analyses publisher open access policies from around the world and provides summaries of self-archiving permissions and conditions of rights given to authors on a journal-by-journal basis. RoMEO is a Jisc service and has collaborative relationships with many international partners, who contribute time and effort to developing and maintaining the service.

Citing Sources

See below for basic guidelines and examples of APA citation style. See the “Citation Help” section for more details, examples, and sample APA papers.

 

 

Why you need to cite sources:

  • Citing sources is the only way to use other people’s work without plagiarizing (i.e. if you are using any resource [journal article, book, website, report, interview, etc.], you NEED to give credit to the original source).
  • The readers of your work need citations to learn more about your ideas and where they came from.
  • Citing sources shows the amount of research you’ve done.
  • Citing sources strengthens your work by lending outside support to your ideas.

In-text citations give credit to sources in the body of your paper. Use in-text citations when paraphrasing, directly quoting, or using ideas from sources.

  • APA citation style uses the author-date method for in-text citations: Author(s)’ last name and the year of publication for the source should appear in parentheses in the text.
  • Names may appear either in the sentence itself or in parentheses following the quotation or paraphrase, but the date should always appear in the parentheses, not in the text of your sentence.

Include page numbers if you are directly quoting the material.

 

Citations in the Reference List must correspond to in-text citations; The word or phrase you use in your in-text citations must be the first thing that appears on the left-hand margin of the corresponding entry in the Reference List.

Formatting

  • Separate page labeled “References,” double-spaced, same margins as rest of paper.
  • Indent the second and subsequent lines of citations by 0.5 inches to create a hanging indent.

Author Names

  • Alphabetized by the last name of the first author of each work.
  • Authors' names are inverted (last name, first initial)
  • List all authors of a particular work for up to and including seven authors. If the work has more than seven authors, list the first six authors and then use ellipses (...) after the sixth author's name. After the ellipses, list the last author's name of the work.

Capitalization and Punctuation

  • Capitalize only the first word of a title and subtitle and proper nouns (books, chapters, articles, web pages)
  • Italicize titles of longer works such as books and journals.
  • Do not italicize, underline, or put quotes around the titles of shorter works such as journal articles or essays in edited collections.

Access NoodleTools

NoodleTools is a citation manager that can help you generate and format citations correctly.

  • Select the type of resource you are citing (article, book, website, etc.) and NoodleTools will prompt you to enter required information. A citation is then generated in your selected format (APA).
  • NoodleTools requires an account, so every time you log in your citations will be saved for you.
  • When you are finished entering information, a reference list can be generated for you and exported to MS Word or Google Docs.

For more details and examples of APA citation style, visit the following websites:

Also find books on APA citation style when you search the Library’s catalog by subject: Psychology -- Authorship -- Style manuals

Associations

Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI)
The Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) brings together representatives from North American universities with established faculty open access policies and those in the process of developing such policies. It was formed to share information and experiences and to illuminate opportunities for moving faculty-led open access forward at member institutions and advocating for open access nationally and internationally.

Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
SPARC is a global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education. SPARC empowers people to solve big problems and make new discoveries through the adoption of policies and practices that advance Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education.

Open Access Network (OAN)
The Open Access Network (OAN) is made up of committed individuals, organizations, societies, publishers, libraries, and institutions working together to Make Knowledge Public.

Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)
The mission of OASPA is to support and represent the interests of Open Access (OA) journal and book publishers globally in all scientific, technical, and scholarly disciplines.

Right to Research Coalition
The Right to Research Coalition was founded by students in the summer of 2009 to promote an open scholarly publishing system based on the belief that no student should be denied access to the articles they need because their institution cannot afford the often high cost of access. Since its launch, the Coalition has grown to represent nearly 7 million students internationally and counts among its members the largest student organizations in both the United States and Canada.

Research Help

Have a question? Librarians are available to assist you during all open hours.

Email: reference@farmingdale.edu
Phone: 631-420-2184
Hours

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