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Course Descriptions

AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

AET 101 Internal Combustion Engine Theory and Servicing

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic heat engine types, their physical configurations and various engine operating cycles. Analytic pressure-volume diagrams are utilized to illustrate the effects of gasoline engine design on performance and combustion requirements. Topics discussed include design, construction, inspection techniques and servicing of the internal combustion engine and its components. Laboratory activities are performed to provide relevant hands-on experience to the students. Also engine aspiration, combustion using the principles of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics, volumetric efficiency and fuel metering systems will be discussed in this course. Corequisite(s): AET 101L Credits: 3 (2,2)

AET 104 Combustion Engine Theory

This is a theory course designed to introduce the student to basic heat engine types, their physical configurations and various engine operating cycles. Analytic pressure-volume diagrams are utilized to illustrate the effects of gasoline engine design on performance and combustion requirements. Engine-vehicle performance parameters are analyzed, utilizing individual and group problem solving techniques. Credits: 2 (2,0)

AET 105 Fuel Systems - SI Engines

This is a theory/laboratory course developed to give the student a basic understanding of spark ignited internal combustion engine fuel systems. Topics discussed include engine aspiration and combustion using the principles of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics as they apply to the intake, exhaust, volumetric efficiency and fuel metering systems. Engine air/fuel requirements are examined along with state of the art fuel delivery systems (carburation and fuel injection), with consideration given to fuel economy and exhaust emissions. Performance characteristics of SI Engines utilizing alternate types of fuels are also examined. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included in the required laboratory section (AET105L). Credits: 2 (1,2)

AET 106 Suspension and Control Systems

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the design, construction and operation of automotive chassis and suspension systems. Topics will include a study of the vehicle frame, suspension, steering, wheels, tires and braking systems. Emphasis is directed to the analysis of the vehicle's systems during operation. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included in the required laboratory section (AET106L). Credits: 3 (2,3)

AET 107 Manual Drivetrains and Driveaxles

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the vehicle's drive train. Topics will include the design, construction, inspection techniques, and service and associated repair operations of the drivetrain and driveaxle components. The topics will include clutches, propeller shafts, universal joints, CV joints, manual transmissions, differentials and other components used in both front and rear wheel drive systems. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included in the required laboratory section. Corequisite: AET 107L Credits: 3 (2,3)

AET 109 Automotive Electrical Principles

This is an automotive theory course designed to introduce students to basic automotive-oriented electrical principles as they relate to both A.C. and D.C. circuits utilized in contemporary automotive electrical systems. Credits: 1 (1,0)

AET 150 Automotive Computer Applications

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic computer utilization and programming. Topics include a thorough introduction to personal computers, instruction in and development of basic programming. Students will be required to develop basic programs for technical automotive problem solving and practical automotive applications. Extensive use of the computer laboratory will be provided in the required laboratory section (AET150L). Credits: 2 (1,2)

AET 208 Automotive Electrical Applications

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic automotive-oriented electrical principles as they relate to both A.C. and D.C. circuits utilized in contemporary automotive electrical systems. The course also covers automotive electrical and electronic systems and their application. The student is required to utilize and understand the operation of various types of electronic equipment, including both computerized engine and emissions analyzers. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included in the required laboratory section (AET 208L). Prerequisite(s): AET 150 or MET 109 Credits: 3 (2,3)

AET 215 Diesel Engines

This is a theory/laboratory course emphasizing in the diesel engine operations and servicing. Topics will include the study of current high-pressure diesel fuel-injection systems and the diesel engine combustion process with respect to fuel injection and combustion changer design. Specific examination of design and performance characteristics of diesel engine air induction, scavenging, supercharging and turbo-charging systems will be covered. Students will also analyze engine governing methods and devices necessary for control, as well as current methods and devices utilized in solving common diesel engine starting problems. Relevant laboratory activities and demonstrations are provided to support the trainings provided during the lecture hours. Prerequisite(s): AET 101 or AET 104 Corequisite: AET 215L Credits: 3 (2,3)

AET 216 Engineering Measurements

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to provide an understanding of engineering measurements theory, methods and devices utilized in today's technology. Topics will include examination of industrial methods of testing, analysis and reporting in the areas of pressure, temperature, speed (time and velocity), fluid flow and exhaust emissions and the testing of common fuels and lubricants. Also included is the evaluation of a series of gasoline engine performance tests and their resulting data, including computer programmed computation and graphical analysis of the completed testing, as presented in a student developed technical paper. Typical engineering measurement instruments and devices will be encountered and utilized in laboratory support of the course (AET216L). Prerequisite(s): AET 150 Credits: 3 (2,2)

AET 217 Applied Mechanics and Engineering Materials

This course is designed to introduce the fundamental principles of applied engineering mechanics and materials. Topics include forces, couples, equilibrium, friction, kinematics of rectilinear and rotational motion, work, energy and power. Principles and applications of hydraulics are also discussed. Engineering materials topics include classifications, structure, properties, phase transformation and heat treatment of metals, inspection and testing techniques of automotive engineering materials. Related problem-solving activities are included. Prerequisite(s): PHY 135 and MTH 130 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AET 218 Applied Manufacturing Processes

This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic manufacturing processes and machine tool operations. Topics covered are casting, cold and hot metal forming, machining and joining processes. Related laboratory activities include projects and experiments with technical reports. Individual laboratory projects will be assigned to each student to reinforce the topics covered in the theory. NOTE: Students completing this course may not receive credit for MET 117. Prerequisite(s): AET 101 and AET 107 Credits: 2 (1,3)

AET 255 Computerized Engine Controls

This is a theory/laboratory course developed to provide the student with a working understanding of automotive electronics and computerized engine control systems. The course includes computerized fuel and emission control systems, with emphasis on the diagnosis of basic engine malfunctions. The student will also analyze the principles and operation of feedback type systems. Electronic diagnostic equipment is used to identify system malfunctions in order to indicate necessary corrective actions. Laboratory activities provide an opportunity for a practical application of diagnostic procedures on current vehicles which is covered in the laboratory section (AET255L). Prerequisite(s): AET 208 Credits: 3 (2,2)

AET 257 Automatic Transmissions

This is a theory/laboratory course dealing with the transmission of power in automobiles, emphasizing contemporary automatic transmissions. Topics covered include applications of the principles of the planetary gear systems, fluids, seals, hydrodynamic drives, hydraulic controls and application devices. The power flow within selected automatic transmissions is discussed and is supported with related activities in the required laboratory section (AET257L). Prerequisite(s): AET 107 Credits: 3 (2,2)

AET 290 Project Seminar

This course is designed to provide the student with the challenge of an independent project. Requirements will include the completion of an extensive faculty approved research/construction project. This project must be related to the automotive field. The student is responsible for the original project concept, which must be supported by preliminary, progress and final technical reports. A video-taped oral presentation is also required. Note: Students cannot get credit for AET 290 and 290W; AET 290W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Automotive & Mechanical Engineering Department. Credits: 1 (0,2)

AET 410 Senior Project

An independent investigation of a technical or managerial problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. The project selected will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in earlier AET studies. Prerequisite(s): Senior status and permission of the Department Chair Credits: 3 (2,2)

AET 490 Selected Topics in Automotive Management Technology

Courses that range from 490-499 are selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty. Credits: 1 to 3 (1,3 to 9)

AET 491 Special Topics: Internship

Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior status and/or permission of the Chair/ Faculty. Credits: 1 to 3 (1,3 to 9)

AET 492 Special Topics: Electric Vehicle

Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior Status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty. Credits: 1 to 3 (1,3 to 9)

AET 493 Special Topics: Hybrid Electrical Vehicle

Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior Status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty. Credits: 1 to 3 (1,3 to 9)

AIR FORCE ROTC

AFR 101 The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force I

This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force. The course covers the history and structure of the US Air Force, the Air Force's capabilities, career opportunities, benefits, and Air Force installations. Credit: 1 (1,0)

AFR 102 The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force II

This course is a continuation of study associated with AFR 102. Credit: 1 (1,0)

AFR 201 The Evolution of U.S. Air and Space Power I

This course features topics on Air Force heritage and leaders; introduction to air power through examination of the Air Force Core Functions; and continued application of communication skills. Its purpose is to instill an appreciation of the development and employment of air power. Credit: 1 (1,0)

AFR 202 The Evolution of U.S. Air and Space Power II

This course is a continuation of study associated with AFR 201. Credit: 1 (1,0)

AFR 301 Air Force Leadership and Management I

This course is a study of leadership, management, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, evaluation systems, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical applications of the concepts being studied. Prerequisite(s): AFR 101, AFR 102, AFR 201, AFR 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AFR 302 Air Force Leadership and Management II

This course is a continuation of study associated with AFR 301. Prerequisite(s): AFR 101, AFR 102, AFR 201, AFR 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AFR 401 National Security Affairs/Prep for Active Duty I

This course examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officer ship, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Prerequisite(s): AFR 101, AFR 102, AFR 201, AFR 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AFR 402 National Security Affairs/Prep for Active Duty II

This course is a continuation of study associated with AFR 401. Prerequisite(s): AFR 101, AFR 102, AFR 201, AFR 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology is the scientific study of human-kind. This course offers an introduction to its four major sub-fields, namely; Physical or Biological anthropology (human evolution, the fossil record, ethology); Archaeology (extinct cultures, classical civilizations, pre-history); Linguistics (language origins, development, diffusion, structure, and change); Sociocultural Anthropology (pioneers in the field, cross-cultural research, case studies, and the future). By focusing on the broad cultural implications and complexities of social communication and interaction, anthropology seeks to understand the whole human experience. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 110 Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural Anthropology is concerned with examination of the social and cultural similarities and differences in the world's human populations. Subsistence patterns, social organization, economic structures, political systems, religion and creative behavior are the major areas we cover. By examining examples ranging from small gathering and hunting groups to large modern day communities, this course provides a broad perspective of the sociocultural realities of our world. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 120 Archaeology

Archaeology is the study of the cultural evolution of humankind using the material remains of past human behavior. This course introduces the methods, logic and history of archaeology through an examination of several ancient civilizations as understood through their architecture and artifacts. Topics include theoretical issues, fieldwork, and interpretation of artifacts and reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples will be drawn from such cities and civilizations as Mesopotamia, Crete, Troy, Ancient Egypt, Pompeii, and North and South America. Students will visit at least one relevant site, exhibit or museum as a course requirement. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 130 North American Indians

This course provides a comprehensive history of the human groups who populated North America before, during and after this continent became involved with the culture, politics and economics of Europe. It focuses on the dynamic heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed on through the generations. Students will be introduced to the anthropological literature concerned with the study and understanding of Native American cultures and societies. Some field study may be required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 210 Modern Anthropology and Globalization

Cultural change and the social processes involved are major areas of cultural anthropological research. By introducing students to the application of anthropological methodologies such as field work and cross-cultural comparison, the course examines some of the major issues which confront human beings in a complex rapidly growing and changing world including: globalization, migration and immigration, population changes, social conflict, agricultural/technological development, nutrition, commodity/cultural exchange, and the future of small scale homogeneous societies. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level social science or business course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 211 Caribbean Cultures

This course covers: pre-European cultures in the Caribbean, the post-Columbus plantation system, contemporary economics and politics, community structure, religion, marriage and family, ethnic diversity, immigration and the arts. An in-depth study of these topics will provide knowledge, understanding and appreciation of this region while offering insights into the development of communities in the U.S. with Caribbean heritage. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 212 Introduction to Medical Anthropology

Medical Anthropology is a subfield of Anthropology that draws upon social, cultural, biological, and linguistic anthropology to better understand those factors which influence health and well being (broadly defined), the experience and distribution of illness, the prevention and treatment of sickness, healing processes, the social relations of therapy management, and the cultural importance and utilization of pluralistic medical systems. (SMA) This course introduces students to the subject and basic methods used in cross-cultural comparisons and research, as well as providing a better understanding of Western and non-Western perceptions and treatments of the body and health issues. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101, ANT 100 or SOC 122 or SOC 228 or BIO with lab Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 220 Topics in Anthropology

Courses that range from 220-229 are special topics courses. This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 221 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 222 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 223 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 224 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 225 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 226 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 227 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 228 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 229 Special Topics in Anthropology

This course provides the opportunity to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 240 Women, Men and Social Change

This course studies men's and women's changing roles, relationships, and participation in the labor force both cross-culturally and historically. We give special emphasis to those changes which occur as technology changes. A major part of the course concerns how and why today's women and men arrive at their social, economic, political and legal statuses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for SOC 240. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 250 Forensic Anthropology

This course provides a broad overview of Forensic Anthropology- an applied field within Anthropology- dealing with the osteological (skeletal anatomy and biology) analysis of human remains. We will employ and discuss scientific methods used to explore and a broad range of problems associated with identification and trauma analysis using data gathering methods such as: characteristics of the human skeleton; identification of ancestry, age, sex; recovery methods; use of appropriate technologies for analysis, including DNA. Prerequisite(s):Any BIO with lab and ANT 100 or ANT 110 or SOC 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 260 Anthropological Theory

This course explores the broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field of Anthropology, from the late 19th century to the present. Debates within the discipline and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, will be examined, as will the enduring relevance of these theories. The course includes reading and critical analysis of texts, as well as class discussions. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 3 credits (3,0)

ANT 266 Anthropological Research

This course focuses on research methods in anthropology as the means for learning ethnographic research methods and how to talk and write about culture, as a basis of anthropological research. The purpose of the course is to gain experience in ethnographic practices, including interviewing, fieldwork research, qualitative analysis, and writing critically informed accounts. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 and EGL 101 3 credits (3,0)

ANT 320 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

Courses that range from 320-329 are special topics courses. This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 321 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 322 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 323 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 324 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 325 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 326 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 327 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 328 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 329 Advanced Topics in Anthropology

This course offers students the chance to study short term topics of specialized, more advanced areas of anthropology. Each topic builds and expands on information learned in introductory courses. This course is particularly recommended to students in the Anthropology Minor program, but is open to other interested students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 110 or ANT 120 and one 200 level ANT course Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 360 Anthropological Theory

This course explores the broad historical outline of major theoretical approaches in the field of Anthropology, from the late 19th century to the present. Debates within the discipline and the larger historical, cultural and intellectual contexts in which they were produced, will be examined, as will the enduring relevance of these theories. The course includes reading and critical analysis of texts, as well as class discussions. Prequisite(s): (ANT 100 or ANT 110), EGL 102, any 200 level ANT course. All with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 366 Anthropological Research Methods

This course focuses on research methods in anthropology as the means for learning ethnographic research methods and how to talk and write about culture, as a basis of anthropological research. The purpose of the course is to gain experience in ethnographic practices, including interviewing, fieldwork research, qualitative analysis, and writing critically informed accounts. Prerequisite(s): (ANT 100 or ANT 110), EGL 102 and any 200 level ANT course. All with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ANT 480 Research Internship I

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 1-3 (0,0,3)

ANT 481 Research Intership I

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 2 (0,0,6)

ANT 482 Research Intership I

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

ANT 485 Research Internship II

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 1 (1,0)

ANT 486 Research Internship II

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 2 (2,0)

ANT 487 Research Internship II

The research internship provides students with insight into the personal qualities and skills that make a good researcher, as well as learning about the broader impact of scientific discovery. While working alongside a faculty member students will be able to hone their research and analytical skills, through hands-on experiences. Students will create a research plan in consultation with the faculty member and spend 45-135 hours during the semester working on research. While each course design will vary, students will be involved in library research, compiling literature reviews, data collection, and data analysis. Students must either complete a paper or poster at the conclusion of their research internship. Prerequisite(s): ANT 366 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARABIC

ARA 131 Arabic I (Elementary)

A beginning course in Arabic emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARA 132 Arabic II (Elementary)

A continuation of ARA 131 or for students who have had 2 to 3 years of high school Arabic. This course emphasizes the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s): ARA 131 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARA 233 Arabic III (Intermediate)

For those students who have taken ARA 132 or four or more years of high school Arabic. This intermediate course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. A literary and cultural reading will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): ARA 132 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARA 234 Arabic IV (Intermediate)

For those student who had taken ARA 233 or four or more years of high school Arabic. This course emphasizes structural review, intensified practice in oral expression with increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. Continued attention will be given to contemporary Arabic culture. Selections from Arabic authors will be read. Prerequisite(s): ARA 233 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

ARC 101 Introduction to Architecture & Construction

This is an introduction to elementary concepts, literacy and graphics in the architectural and construction field. This elective course is for students who have never taken any hand drawing/drafting and Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). The course will provide a hands on experience in architectural and construction drawing/drafting, sketching, model building, orthographic projection. The use of reading scales, lengths, areas and volumes in drawings is developed to help students visualize and understand building elements and plans. The course will include basic CAD fundamentals, site visits and future employment requirements and opportunities for those interested in the major. Credits: 3 (2,2)

ARC 131 Introduction to Graphics

Introduction to architectural and construction graphics using hand drawing/drafting and Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). Hand drawing/drafting topics include: lettering, technical sketching, use of drafting instruments, the fundamentals of orthographic projection, plan, section, elevation development and pictorial drawings to develop the student’s abilities to visualize and describe objects graphically. CAD topics include software commands and drawing strategies for 2-D and 3-D CAD work, plans, sections, elevations, and details, information management, assembly of drawings and scales. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 255 Architectural Design I

Studies the principles of form, space and order that underlie architectural design. Concepts include: mass void modeling, volume and space construction, enclosing planes, circulation, organization, hierarchy, and structure. The diagram and sketch model are introduced as methods of understanding design. Concepts are explored in both three dimensional and graphic form. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 131 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 257 Architectural Design II

Continuation of Architectural Design I. Emphasis is placed on the process by which design decisions are made and the methods of analysis in context to the existing environment. Topics include: structure, form and function, building in context, light and construction. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 255 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 263 Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Energy Systems

An overview of mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) aspects of buildings. Intended to develop students' ability to analyze energy requirements of buildings and various methods of energy conservation and thermal efficiency. Topics covered include heat flow, system and equipment for heating and cooling. Also included are water supply and wastewater treatments for buildings. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARC 282 Construction Design

Construction Design is a technology-based design studio emphasizing a methodological approach to the assembly of the building's envelope, materials and systems. The integration of building code requirements, life safety, accessibility, building energy systems, structure, construction, and materials are central to effectively achieving design intent. Knowledge from Materials and Method of Construction I and II, Energy in Buildings and Graphics are applied to specific drawing assignments. A residential Type V construction, and a commercial Type II or Type III construction, building project will be advanced resulting in a set of construction documents. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 131 and CON 162 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 350W Architectural Theory and Design Factors (Writing Intensive)

This course will examine a series of architectural theories and design factors that attempts to explain, predict or influence design decisions that result in the built environment. Topics include: historical theory, form and aesthetics; architectural technology; the urban, natural and human environment; economic, zoning and code factors; the social and behavioral implications of architecture, the design process itself and the architectural profession. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite(s): ARC 257 and ARC 362 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher. Note: Students cannot get credit for ARC 350 and 350W; ARC 350W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Architectural/Construction Management Department. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARC 362 History of Western Architecture

A study of the development of building design from the Ancient Egyptians and Greeks throughout the major historical periods to the present. Emphasis is on the evolution of the forms derived from indigenous technologies of periods surveyed. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ARC 364 Site Design and Construction

This is an advanced course in the utilization of engineering and architectural principles from concept through the construction techniques of traditional and sustainable site development. Site planning techniques, municipal land development requirements, zoning regulations, soil stabilization techniques, erosion control parameters, stormwater management practices, and site construction details are applied to a site design project. Computer-aided programs in site design and survey data management will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 and (ARC 131 or CON 121) Credits: 3 (2,2)

ARC 376 Architectural Design III

Continuation of Architectural Design II. Emphasis is placed on the urban and natural environment. The role of aesthetics, symbols, and the use of historical elements in the making of places, spaces and communicating meaning are explored. Topics include: building on Main Street, the making of an urban space and a cemetery or park design. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 257 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 399 Applied Research Topics

A program of applied research and independent study on topics a faculty member is currently working on. this course is meant to enrich the learning experience by introducing the student to methods and analysis in applied research. this is a fully faculty directed and supervised structured research experience. Applied research work will be presented in an appropriate form. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

ARC 476 Architectural Design IV

Continuation of Architectural Design III. Emphasis is placed a project that integrates principles of architectural design and includes elements of building systems, structural and site design, zoning and building codes, etc. on an actual site in the area. Students will present their final project to invited architects at the end of the semester. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 376 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ARC 486 Architectural Design V

This architectural design course integrates several architectural and engineering design philosophies and methodologies into a comprehensive studio project. This course introduces very little new material; rather it is to synthesize knowledge learned in the following areas of design and analysis: architectural, structure, construction, site, energy (mechanical/electrical) and building systems and cost estimating. This multidisciplinary project uses a student design team approach. Note: This course includes a required laboratory designed to provide extra time for the studio experience. Prerequisite(s): ARC 282 and ARC 476 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

ART HISTORY

ART 123 Art History

An analysis of the social, physical and psychological influences affecting the artist during various historical periods through the present. Emphasis is on the interrelationship between the changing purposes of art and variations in the meaning and form of artistic expression. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 200 History of Graphic Design

Graphic design has great power and has both reflected and influenced our society and culture throughout history. This course identifies the key movements within the history of graphic design from the Graphic Renaissance throughout today and highlights how these movements have mirrored and changed the course of our society and the field of graphic design. Lectures, images and texts will be used in of each of the following periods: Graphic Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution, Mid-Century Modernism, Late-Modernism Post-Modernism and the Digital Age. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 201 Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through The Middle Ages

A survey of the history of the visual arts from their beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 202 Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to the Present

A survey of the history of the visual arts from the Early Renaissance to the Present. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 203 History of Interaction Design

The foundations of interaction design preceded the invention and use of the first computers and have evolved with the constant changes in technology. From punch cards to voice recognition, from the earliest computers to the mobile platforms of today, the need for a formal definition and definitive history of Interaction Design has increased as quickly as the technology has changed. This class will provide an over view of the history of the relationship between human beings and the tools and technology they use. The evolution of the computer and other digital devices will be explored with the emphasis on the events that lead to the formalization of Interaction Design into a vibrant and growing discipline. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (2,2)

ART 242 Italian Renaissance Art

This course is designed to introduce students to Ancient through Baroque art found in Italy. Students will be required to meet on campus prior to departing for Europe to study the great masterpieces of the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods of art found in their original contexts throughout Italy. Works of Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Illuminated Manuscripts and other applied arts will be studied as they relate to the periods in which they were created. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 244 Visual Studies and Studio in Northern

This course is designed to introduce students to Medieval through 19th century European art found in the countries of France, Belgium and Holland. The class will meet four times on campus prior to departing for Europe to study the great masterpieces of the Gothic Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo Classical, Romantic, Realistic and Impressionist and Post-Impressionist periods of art found in their original contexts throughout Europe. The Great institutions to be visited may include: the Louvre, the Rijks Museum and Hague to name a few. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 and VIS 101 or VIS 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 245 Visual Art Studies and Studio in Greece

This course will introduce the Ancient through Byzantine periods of art as they occurred in Greece. Students will study the art and the history surrounding the art's creation during three lectures on the campus of Farmingdale State. This will occur before departing to Europe to visit the country of Greece to study the original art first hand over the period of two weeks. In Europe, students will explore the Aegean, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine art styles by studying works of architecture, sculpture, painting, illuminated manuscripts, archaeological and other applied arts in the context of churches, archaeological sites and art museums. Mythology and Homeric literature will be introduced in order to gain an insight into the cultural foundations of Western Art and Civilization. Students will be assigned a term paper based on specific works studied, and will also be expected to maintain a journal including notes, drawings and other entries related to their experience abroad. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 301 Arts in the Twentieth Century

An analysis of the development of music, art, film, theater, dance, architecture, and design through the nine decades of the twentieth century. Field trips to various cultural events and extensive use of audio-visual materials are included. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 302 Art History: Survey of American Art

A survey of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the early colonial period to the present. Lectures, supplemented by slides and textbook illustrations, will provide the basis for an analysis of the "schools" styles, and influences that determined and are affecting the direction of American Art. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ART 303 MesoAmerican Art History

This course is designed to expose students to the art, culture and history of Mexico and Central America from the first peoples of the Americas to the Spanish Conquest, Colonial Period, Revolution, Modern and contemporary eras. The class will introduce the student to visual works of art including sculpture, painting, architecture and other applied arts. The course begins with prehistoric art of the Clovis peoples of the American Southwest and concludes with the contemporary era. The class covers Clovis, Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, Miztec, Aztec, Mexican and Guatemalan art and touches on significant imported Spanish influences. The history, mythologies, politics, religions, and philosophical thought of the periods are introduced in order to provide a context for the visual art. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVIATION

AVN 100 General Aeronautics

This course provides introductory orientation and practical information essential to the career progression of both pilots and aviation administrators. Topics include: attributes of an aviation professional; aircraft design, components, performance, operation, maintenance and safety with human factors emphasis. (3,0) Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 101 Aviation Industry: A History Perspective

This course is a basic survey of the aviation industry viewed from a historical perspective. Topics covered will range from the early days of aviation to the present. The course will also examine the chronology of aviation laws and regulations and how they have changed from aviation beginnings in the United States to present day. At the conclusion of this course, the student will have a comprehensive knowledge of the U.S. air transportation industry and will understand its significant social/economic impact upon the nation and the world. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 104 Private Pilot Ground

Private Pilot-Ground Training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.105 as well as 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix B, as appropriate. Selected subject areas will include airplane systems, aerodynamic principles, flight environment, communication and flight information, meteorology for pilots, FAA Regulations, National Airspace System, NTSB, AC’s, interpretation of weather data, aircraft performance, radio and visual navigation, human factors, flight safety, and cross country flight planning. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA “Knowledge Examination” necessary for the Private Pilot certificate. Prerequisite(s): FAA Student Pilot Certificate Credits: 3 (3,0,1)

AVN 105 Private Pilot Flight To Solo

Private Pilot Flight to Solo will enable the student to meet some of the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.109 or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix B, as appropriate. During this course, the student obtains the foundations for all future aviation training. The student becomes familiar with the training airplane and learns how the airplane controls are used to establish and maintain specific flight attitudes and ground tracks. At the conclusion of the course, the student demonstrates proficiency in basic flight maneuvers and the student pilot will have successfully completed no less than three (3) takeoffs and full stop landings in the traffic pattern as Pilot-in-Command. Students must have a FAA Student Pilot Certificate/FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. Aero fees will be charged. Note: FAA minimum hours approved are 35 total hours for AVN 105 & 106. Prerequisite(s): FAA Student Pilot Certificate and AVN 104 Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 106 Private Pilot Flight To Certificate

Private Pilot Flight training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.109 or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix B, as appropriate. Private Pilot Flight to Certificate will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain a Private Pilot certificate. An enrolled student must demonstrate through oral examinations, practical tests, and appropriate records that he/she meets the knowledge, skill and experience requirements necessary to obtain a Private Pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. Selected subject areas will include engine starting, normal and crosswind taxiing, radio communications, normal takeoffs, power on and power off stalls, maneuvering during slow flight, traffic patterns, go around from a rejected landing, crosswind and normal landings, cross country flying, radio navigation, cockpit management, low level wind shear precautions, airport and runway marking and lighting, constant airspeed climbs and descents, stall spin awareness, and steep turns. Students must have a FAA Student Pilot Certificate/FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA Private Pilot practical exam. Aero fees will be charged. Note: FAA minimum hours approved are 35 total hours for AVN 105 & 106. Prerequisite(s): AVN 104 and AVN 105 with a grade of C or higher; FAA Student Pilot Certificate Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 110 Introduction to Flight

Introduction to Flight offers students with no prior flight time an opportunity to begin training in normal preflight, in-flight and post-flight procedures as provided by the SUNY Flight Line. The student is afforded 5 hours combined flight and simulator time and may then commence flight training for Private Pilot. Aero fees will be charged. Note: Flight courses must be completed within a year from the date a student registers. Within this time frame a student must either 1) Successfully complete the course and be issued a grade, OR 2) Withdraw from the course, due to the following extenuating circumstances: Active Military Obligations, Medical conditions requiring removal from active flight status for a duration of 60 consecutive days or more. If neither of the above occurs, a failing grade will be assigned. Credits: 2 (0,0,6)

AVN 112 Pilot Proficiency

Prior to beginning training at FSC students with prior flight experience of solo privileges or higher will be required to go through an evaluation. A grade and or transfer credit will be issued upon successful completion of the applicable requirements per ratings/certificates held. Course length is contingent upon student’s knowledge and skills. Aero Fees will be charged. Prerequisite(s): Prior flight experience of solo or higher Credits: 2 (1,3)

AVN 126 Aviation Security Management I

This course will introduce students to techniques and procedures necessary to maintain security in the aviation industry. Topics will include screening passengers and cargo, access control, Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) monitoring, Explosive Trace Detection (ETD) systems, X-ray systems, wanding, and other new developmental technologies. In this course, students will become familiar with the above security methods by using hands on techniques. Students will learn how to operate and maintain Explosive Trace Detection machines and X-Rays, properly screen passengers and monitor CCTV systems to prevent breaches in security. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (1,6)

AVN 128 Unmanned Aerial Systems

The course provides students with a thorough understanding of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) history, applications, airframe types, sensors, payloads, and future developments. In-depth coverage of applicable FAA regulations and flight operations in the National Airspace will coincide with demonstrations of UAS usage. Prerequisite(s): None Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 201 Safety Ethics

This course emphasizes ethical decision making as it applies to Complex Systems, aviation and aerospace, nuclear power plant, civil and IT engineering and the medical field. These systems have an extremely narrow tolerance for error, often resulting in monumental impact on the public, the economy of the nation and human life. This course seeks to increase the awareness levels of ethical issue for industry professionals and to provide the necessary skills to effectively deal with such critical problem solving issues. Topics include complex systems ethical decision making, safety with human factors emphasis, applied ethics for members of complex systems, corporate culture and risk management theory, moral and values. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 202 Aviation Meteorology

A basic course in Aviation Weather. Weather theory including differential heating, air mass development, wind frontal activity and systems, weather hazards, weather reporting and weather forecasting is covered. Charts which are studied include Surface Analysis and Weather Depiction Charts, Constant Pressure Charts, Composite Moisture Stability Charts. Prerequisite(s): AVN 104 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 208 Instrument Pilot Ground

Instrument Pilot Ground training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.65(b), or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix C, as appropriate. Selected subject areas will include Federal Aviation Regulations that apply to flight operations under IFR, appropriate information that applies to flight operations under IFR in the "Aeronautical Information Manual," Air Traffic Control system and procedures for instrument flight operations, IFR navigation and approaches by use of navigation systems, use of IFR enroute and instrument approach procedure charts, procurement and use of aviation weather reports and the elements of forecasting weather trends based on that information and personal observation of weather conditions, safe and efficient operation of aircraft under instrument flight rules and conditions, recognition of critical weather situations and wind shear avoidance, aeronautical decision making and judgment, and crew resource management, including crew communication and coordination. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA "Knowledge Examination" necessary for the Instrument Pilot Rating. Prerequisite(s): AVN 104 and AVN 105 with a grade of C or higher FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Test (with a grade of 70 or better). Credits: 3 (3,1)

AVN 209 Instrument Pilot Flight

Instrument Pilot Flight training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.65, or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix C, as appropriate. Instrument Pilot Flight will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain an Instrument Rating. Selected subject areas will include airplane attitude control by reference to instruments, use of full and partial panel reference, accurate use of navigation systems by maintaining positional awareness, holding patterns, instrument approaches, and IFR cross country procedures. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA Instrument Rating practical exam. Students must possess an FAA Private Pilot Certificate/FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. Aero fees will be charged. Note: FAA minimum hours approved are 35 total hours for AVN 209. Prerequisite(s): AVN 106 with a grade of C or higher Corequisite(s): AVN 208 Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 211 Commercial Pilot Ground

Commercial Pilot Ground Training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.125(b), or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix D, as appropriate. Selected subject areas will include: accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board, basic aerodynamics and the principles of flight, meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations, wind shear recognition and avoidance, and the use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts, safe and efficient operation of aircraft weight and balance computations, use of performance charts, significance and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations, use of aeronautical charts and a magnetic compass for pilotage and dead reckoning, use of air navigation facilities, aeronautical decision making and judgment, principles and functions of aircraft systems, maneuvers, procedures, and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft, night high altitude operations, procedures for operating within the National Airspace System, and procedures for flight and ground training for lighter than air ratings. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA “Knowledge Examination” necessary for the Commercial Pilot certificate. Prerequisite(s): AVN 106 and AVN 208 with a grade of C or higher; FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Test (with a grade of 70 or better). Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 212 Commercial Pilot Flight

Commercial Pilot Flight training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.129 or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix D, as appropriate. Commercial Pilot Flight will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. Selected subject areas include accurate planning of VFR cross country flights, pilotage, dead reckoning, navigation systems, and commercial maneuvers as well as provide the skill necessary to safely fly a complex airplane. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA Commercial Pilot practical exam. Students must possess a FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. Aero Fees will be charged. Note: FAA minimum hours approved are 65 total hours for AVN 212. Prerequisite(s): AVN 209 with a grade of C or higher Corequisite(s): AVN 211 Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 230 Airline Management

This course will give the students an integrated study of airline operations and functions. Domestic and international regulation of air carries and the industry's changing structure due to alliances and globalization are addressed. Topics include the annual profit plan, uniform system of accounts and reports, demand analysis, scheduling, the theory of pricing, fleet planning, facilities planning, airline financing, airline economics, airline marketing and pricing, computer reservation and revenue management systems, fleet planning and scheduling, aircraft maintenance aircraft finance, labor relations, organizational structure, and strategic planning. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 270 Introduction to Airports Management

An introductory course, which provides foundational information and strategic concepts about the air transport/ airport system. Topics include: Overview of Air Transport/ Airport system, Department of Transportation/Federal Aviation Administration, Intro to Airports/Management, Organizational Development, Management Roles and Theories, Motivational and Communications Principles/Processes. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 271 Airport Capacity/Delay/Airspace Environment

This course covers the following topics: Airport Capacity and Delay, Technological and Weather Solutions, Air Traffic Control, U.S. Airspace, Air Navigation and Navigational Aids Runway Lighting Systems, FAA FAR Part 77, Environmental Regulations and Airport Noise, Land Use Compatibility. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 280 Introduction to Air Cargo Operations

The course introduces the student to the growing, technical and multi-faceted air cargo industry. The student will understand the role that air cargo has played in the development of the air carrier industry, contractual and legally binding regulations, and national and international trade. A visit to off-campus air cargo facilities will compliment classroom discussions, lectures and videos. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher or CRJ 100 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 281 Air Cargo Government and Industry Regulations

This course exposes the student to the study and process of regulations of the Air Cargo Industry. It includes a study of and compliance with government and air carrier regulations; with practical applications of the specialized manuals and penalties of non-compliance. It includes the influence that organizations such as ICACO and IATA have on the Air Cargo industry. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 291 Air Cargo Cooperative Experience II

This Cooperative Experience or Internship is an elective for second year Aviation Administration students. The course will provide employer/student designed internship experience. The student will acquire work skills and cooperative attitudes that will complement and enhance the academic competencies learned during the prior year. Credits: 3 (0,10 to 12)

AVN 300W Government in Aviation (Writing Intensive)

This course expands and focuses on many of the regulatory subjects in AVN101 (Aviation History). It is a study of the constitutional, legislative, executive and judicial control of aviation from the local, state, federal and international perspective. This course forms the foundation for AVN400 Aviation law. This is a writing-intensive course. Junior or Senior standing required. Note: Students cannot get credit for AVN 300 and 300W. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Aviation Administration Department. Prerequisite(s): (AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher or CRJ 100) and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 309 Certified Flight Instructor- Ground

This course will allow students to meet the requirements as specified by 14 CFR Part 61.185 or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix F, as appropriate, and will allow students to meet the requirements necessary to complete the Certified Flight Instructor Written Exams: Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI), Certified Flight Instructor Airplane (FIA), and the Certified Flight Instructor Instrument Written Exam (CFII). Selected subject areas will include applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to Certified Flight Instructor pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations, the fundamentals of instructing, including: the learning process; elements of effective teaching; student evaluation and testing; course development; lesson planning; and classroom training techniques. Also included are the aeronautical knowledge areas for a recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificate applicable to the aircraft category for which flight instructor privileges are sought. A grade will be issued based on the completion of the following written exams: the student will either take the FAA “Knowledge Examinations” (Written Exams) necessary for the Certified Flight Instructor Certificate; Fundamentals of Instructing (FOI), Flight Instructor Airplane (FIA), and the Flight Instructor Instrument Written Exam (FII) or the FAA “Knowledge Examinations” (Written Exams) necessary for the Advanced Ground Instructor Certificate; Fundamentals of Instructing (FOI), Advanced Ground Instructor (AGI), and the Instrument Ground Instructor (IGI). Prerequisite(s): AVN 211 and AVN 209 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 310 Certified Flight Instructor-Flight

This course will allow students to meet the requirements as specified by 14 CFR Part 61.187 or 14 CFR Part 141 Appendix F, as appropriate, and will allow students to meet the requirements necessary to complete the Certified Flight Instructor Airplane Practical Exam. Selected subject areas will include applicable Federal Aviation Regulations of this chapter that relate to Certified Flight Instructor pilot privileges, limitations, and flight operations, the fundamentals of instructing, including: The learning process; elements of effective teaching; student evaluation and testing; course development; lesson planning; and classroom training techniques. Also included are practical flight training modules necessary to gain the required aeronautical experience and proficiency applicable to recreational, private, and commercial pilot certificates appropriate to the aircraft category/class for which flight instructor privileges are sought. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA Certified Flight Instructor Certificate. Students must possess an FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Privileges/FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. Aero Fees will be charged. Prerequisite(s): AVN 212 with a grade of C or higher Corequisite(s): AVN 309 Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 320 Air Carrier Flight Operations

A study of the operational considerations and procedures of air carrier flight operations. Flight Operations conducted under 14CFR121 (Part121 air carriers) are highlighted. Also included are 14CFR135 (Part135) Air Carriers, supplemental air carriers and Operators of Large Aircraft flight operations. Prerequisite(s): AVN 208 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 321 Physiology of Flight

Operational and lifestyle considerations and consequences arising from physiological factors will be introduced, with an emphasis on the atmosphere and high-altitude flight (Hyperbarism). General fundamentals of anatomy and psychology will be reviewed to impart career-prolonging health maintenance and stress reduction techniques. Subtle yet critical aviation issues such as situational awareness and crew resource management will be explored. Prerequisite (s): AVN-209 with a grade of C or higher and AVN-211 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 322 Advanced Aircraft Systems

This course exposes the student to the advanced aircraft systems commonly found in air carrier aircraft. Included are Electrical Systems, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Flight Controls, Landing Gear Systems, Auto-Pilots and Cockpit Automation, Master Warning and Caution Annunciation Systems. At the conclusion of this course, the student should have a good level of operational understanding of these systems. Prerequisite(s): AVN 211 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 323 Air Carrier Flight Planning

This course exposes the student to the area of flight planning for the major carrier's operations. The main area of study will include the following subjects: High Altitude Aviation Meteorology, Transport Category Aircraft weight and balance, Take-off, En-route and Landing Performance and Emergency Procedures. Advanced Flight Planning, Jet Route Structure. Jeppesen IFR High Altitude En-route Charts. NOS and Jeppesen IFR Approach Plates and Published Minimums; U.S. Air Traffic Control Systems/Airspace; Airline Positive Operational Control Concepts; Federal Aviation Regulations Part 121/1199/135; Airline Communications Systems- Secal/ARINC/ACARS/Satcom Captain/Dispatcher Joint Authority/Decision Making. Prerequisite(s): AVN 322 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 330 Airline Marketing

This course examines the principles of marketing used by the major U.S. airlines and how they are applied for long term financial success in the industry. There will be an initial review of the structure of the air transport market and the industry marketing environment. This will be followed by a detailed study examining the airline business and marketing strategies, product design, pricing, revenue management, distribution channels, and selling and advertising policies. Prerequisite(s): AVN 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 370 Airport Financial Management

This course covers the following topics: Financial Management Managerial Accounting, Airport Fees, Rates, Charges, Airport Capital Development/Funding, Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Funding, Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Funding. Prerequisite(s): AVN 270 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): BUS 201 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 371 Airport Planning

This course covers the following topics: Airport System Planning, National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS), Metropolitan Airport System Planning, State Airport System Planning, Airport Master Planning, Airport Layout Plans, Airport Design, Design of Other Landing Facilities, Industrial Park Design, Terminal Planning/ Design/ Operation, Other Terminal Area Buildings, Americans with Disability Act Access. Prerequisite(s): AVN 270 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 380 Air Cargo Sales Management

The students will be introduced to the topic through a variety of pedagogical methods that will include lectures, hands-on use of the most prominent manuals, regulations related to the industry, group discussions and videos. Prerequisite(s): AVN 280 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 381 Air Cargo Management Techniques

This course will provide students with an overview of the air cargo management in relation to leadership, safety, cost effectiveness, and problem solving. This course will cover various managerial topics that pertain to air cargo operations, with a particular focus on identifying staffing needs, providing acceptable customer service, determining practical goals for maintaining service levels over an extended period of time. This course will also review IATA rules and regulations, and provide students with practical in-class exercises which will focus on developing operational flight schedules for an air cargo operator while maintaining the objective of remaining compliant with various human resources and labor regulations. Prerequisite(s): AVN 280 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 400 Aviation Law

Aviation Law develops the student's knowledge to the application level of learning by emphasis on real cases to demonstrate the legal, regulatory and government theory previously discussed in AVN 101and AVN 300. Emphasis will be on the FAA's roles in regulating aviation including the rule making process, certification of airmen, medical certification and enforcement. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or AVN 300W with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 401 Aviation Economics

This course covers the economic history of the air carrier industry from 1911 to the present. The details of airline deregulation prior to 1978 are discussed as is the transition from regulation to deregulation- 1978 to present and Marketing and financial practices as they exist today under deregulation. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156, AVN 270 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 404 Corporate and Business Aviation

Study of the flight operations, administration, maintenance and financial functions of a corporate flight department. The FBO and small airplane business will be discussed including applications in aerial photography and spraying, aircraft sales and financing. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or 300W Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 410 Commercial Multi-Engine Pilot Rating

This course prepares the Commercial Pilot with single-engine and instrument ratings to add multi-engine airplane privileges to his/her certificate. Commercial Pilot Flight training will enable the student to meet the prerequisite(s) specified in 14 CFR Part 61.63 or 14 CFR Part 141.57, as appropriate. Additionally, the student will gain practical experience applying the concepts of Crew Resource Management in the cockpit by utilizing a series of Flight Training Device sessions and defined flight training sessions. The student will be introduced to multi crew operations by applying newly acquired skills applicable to the multi crew environment such as Pilot Flying, Pilot Monitoring, advanced aircraft briefings, emergency and abnormal situations in various phases of flight, cockpit automation, Crew Resource Management to include crew communication and coordination, and Aeronautical decision making and judgment. Students must possess an FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate/FAA 3rd Class or higher Medical Certificate. Aero Fees will be charged. A grade will be issued upon taking the FAA Commercial Multi-Engine Practical Exam. Prerequisite(s): AVN 209 and AVN 212 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 411 Certified Flight Instructor Instrument

This course prepares the student with a CFI to acquire the Flight Instructor -Instrument rating. Training will consist of at least 20 hours flight and 15 hours ground instruction. Passing the FAA Flight Instructor-Instrument Airplane Knowledge test and the FAA flight test will complete the course. Aero fees will be charged. Prerequisite(s): AVN 310 with grade of a C or higher Credits: 2 (1,0,3)

AVN 412 Certified Flight Instructor-Multi-Engine

This course prepares the student with a CFI to acquire the Flight Instructor – Multi Engine Rating. Training will consist of at least 25 hours flight and 20 hours ground instruction. Passing the FAA Flight Instructor Multi Engine Knowledge test and the FAA flight test will complete the course. Aero fees will be charged. Prerequisite(s): AVN 310 and AVN 410 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 1 (0,0,4)

AVN 417 Homeland Security in Aviation

This course will expose the student to the importance of Homeland Security in the aviation industry and the important role each employee in the industry is charged with. Students will gain experience in identifying false travel documents and identifying suspicious air travelers. This course will focus on current national security threats in the aviation industry. Upon the successful completion of this course the students will meet the requirements of the initial and recurrent security training requirements mandated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) under Title 49 CFR 1552. Prerequisite(s): AVN 300 or 300W with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 421 Gas Turbine Engines

An in-depth study of gas turbine engines as found in air carrier and high performance aircraft. Topics include the history of turbine development, jet propulsion, theory engine design and construction and control systems. FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating required. Prerequisite(s): AVN 321 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 422 Aerodynamics and Aircraft Performance

Advanced aerodynamic principles will be introduced following extensive review of fundamentals. Emphasis will be on practical design and performance considerations including mission, cost, and feasibility. This course will familiarize the student with the application of aeronautical principles and design practices. The course will focus steps in preliminary design of general aviation aircraft with emphasis on the iterative aspects of design. Prerequisite(s): AVN 211 with a grade of C or higher and PHY 136 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 423 Crew Resource Management

This course deals with flight-crew decision making. It includes, but is not limited to: optimum decision-making techniques; personality profiling; crew communication; high risk areas of a flight; maintaining situational and spatial awareness; crew discipline; and airline-level standard operating procedures. Prerequisite(s): Junior Advances Standing and Completion of an AVN 300W level course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 424 Advanced Avionics and Cockpit Automation

Introduction to modern cockpit avionics suites as found in corporate Jets and Transport Category aircrafts. Principles, operations and limitations of advanced avionics suites typically found in this category aircraft. Automation topics covered include automatic flight control and flight director systems, stability augmentation systems, power management systems, flight management systems and autoland/go around systems. Latest technology navigation systems topics including inertial navigation systems (INS), inertial reference systems (IRS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) including Local Area Augmentation Systems (LAAS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS). Prerequisite (s): AVN-209 with C or higher and AVN-211 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 425 Safety of Flight

Safety of Flight is an essential course for students to understand the principles and regulatory practices of commercial aviation safety in the United States and worldwide community in the 21st century. It includes an examination of aircraft accidents, the respective roles of the FAA and NTSB, human factors in aviation safety, air traffic safety systems, and introduction to Safety Management Systems (SMS). The student will obtain the necessary safety of flight knowledge to be able to effectively work in the aviation industry. At the completion of the course, students will be able to assess contemporary issues in safety of flight and demonstrate understanding of aviation safety and human factors. Prerequisite(s): AVN 209 with a grade of C or higher and AVN 211 with grade of a C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 432 Aviation Insurance

This course covers the basic foundations of Aviation Insurance and Risk Management. Topics to be covered include hull and liability coverage, subrogation and the insurer's interests after covering a loss, underwriting and claims management. This course helps students to explain the various types of insurance coverage found in aviation such as, hangar keepers, employers, pilots, airlines and airport operators. Prerequisite(s): AVN 400 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 440 Commuter Turboprop Training

This course exposes the student to an actual air carrier transport aircraft initial training ground school. The course will examine all of the specific aircraft and engine systems for this airplane and will be conducted so as to simulate the intensity of an airline training course. All major systems and subsystems of the aircraft as well as its limitation and normal and emergency operating procedures will be covered in detail. At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to pass an airline style written and oral exam on the aircraft. Prerequisite(s): AVN 322 and AVN 421 Corequisite(s): AVN 424 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 443 Specialty Flying

Specialty flying is a vital area in General Aviation although it does not attract the attention that airline and military flying do. This course will deal with Agricultural Aviation; Bush Flying using float, large wheel and ski equipped aircraft. Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 447 Capstone Professional Pilot Seminar

The Capstone Pro Pilot Seminar will be the culminating Upper Division experience in flight education for the Professional Pilot program. The seminar will require students to examine key aviation concepts presented in the Pro Pilot track and connect key learning objectives associated with these concepts to the skills necessary for success in the aviation industry as a pilot. Selected subject areas will include but not be limited to aviation safety, aviation law, crew resource management, safety ethics, physiology of flight, and aviation meteorology and how these relate to the requirements to be a certificated instrument-rated commercial pilot and fly as a certified flight instructor or a multiengine airplane pilot. Students will be required to complete comprehensive case studies of aviation accidents, present results to the seminar participants and lead the case discussion. A Capstone mentorship flight or simulator event summarizing the key course concepts will be included as part of the course (flight fees as applicable). Prerequisite(s): AVN 209 with C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,1)

AVN 470 Airport Operations

This course covers the following topics: Airport Operations and FAA FAR Part 139, FAR Part 139, Airport Self Inspection, Pavement Surfaces, Movement and Safety Areas, Airfield Lighting and Pavement Marking, Snow and Ice Control, Snow Removal Equipment, Airport Condition Reporting, Ground Vehicles, Public Protection, Wildlife Hazard Management, Airport Emergency Plan and Response, Airport Air Carrier Security. Prerequisite(s): AVN 270 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 471 Aviation Administration Seminar

This seminar is the capstone course for students majoring in Aviation Administration. It is designed to integrate all the topics that students have learned during their courses of study. The class will include practical preparation for a career in aviation, and students will have opportunities during the semester to participate in industry visits/observations in order to get a better understanding of future job options and placement. The students’ main focus during the semester will be a detailed research project which will allow them to demonstrate what they have learned throughout the program. The research project will culminate in a formal presentation of results to members of the university community and also representatives from industry. Prerequisite(s): AVN 470 or AVN 480 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 480 Air Cargo Operations-Advanced

The course will expand upon the introductory concepts learned in AVN 280. Students will be exposed to various in-class exercises that will address the importance of identifying the variables involved in the flow of typical air cargo operations. Students will gain expertise in "troubleshooting" and solving problematic situations such as flight delay due to mechanical and/or weather; late delivery of high priced cargo products; emergency response to live animal and/or perishable equipment; damage to aircraft and/or cargo ULDs or other equipment; and employee injury. The real world applications of Quality Work Programs (QWP) and current advances in air cargo automation and/or computer controlled processes will be explored. Communication skills in air cargo operations management will also be stressed. Prerequisite(s): AVN 280 Credits: 3 (3,0)

AVN 490 Aviation Internship

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to earn elective credit for acquiring hands-on industry experience. Prior work site approval by the Aviation Department is required before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credits with an overall GPA of 2.5. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

BCS 101 Programming Concepts and Problem Solving

This course will provide an introduction to programming logic and problem solving techniques using different programming languages. The topics covered in this course will provide the skills needed to learn languages such as Visual Basic, C+ + and JAVA. Topics include such items as constants and variables, data types, scope of variables, basic logic constructs, subroutines and functions. Students who have completed BCS 120 or equivalent cannot take BCS 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications

This is an introductory course in the use of personal computers in today's society. Students will receive instruction in basic computer concepts and terminology, the fundamentals of the Windows operating system and have hands on experience at the beginning to intermediate level using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The Internet will be used to supplement textbook and lecture materials. Computer Systems students cannot use BCS 102 to meet a BCS Elective requirement. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 110 Introductory Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

This course will cover introductory topics that are not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from semester to semester and reflects the interests and needs of students, faculty and industry. Permission of Department Chair is required. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair (3,0) Credits:3 (3,0)

BCS 111 Introductory Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

This course will cover introductory topics that are not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from semester to semester and reflects the interests and needs of students, faculty and industry. Permission of Department Chair is required. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 112 Introductory Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

This course will cover introductory topics that are not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from semester to semester and reflects the interests and needs of students, faculty and industry. Permission of Department Chair is required. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits:3 (3,0)

BCS 113 Introductory Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

This course will cover introductory topics that are not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from semester to semester and reflects the interests and needs of students, faculty and industry. Permission of Department Chair is required. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 114 Introductory Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

This course will cover introductory topics that are not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from semester to semester and reflects the interests and needs of students, faculty and industry. Permission of Department Chair is required. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 120 Foundations of Computer Programming I

This course introduces the C++ Programming Language as a means of developing structured programs. Students will be taught to develop algorithms using top-down stepwise refinement. Students will be introduced to the concept of Object Oriented programming. In addition, students will get a thorough exposure to C++ syntax and debugging techniques. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 130 Website Development I

This is an introductory course in Web page authoring in which students will create Web pages using HTML (HyperText Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). In addition to the introductory topics of changing text appearance, creating hyperlinks, and inserting images into a Web page, advanced topics such as layout, tables, and forms will also be covered. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 136 Programming in COBOL I

The fundamental skills and knowledge of computer programming using COBOL are developed in this course. Among the topics studied are elements of the COBOL programming language and application of the language to solving business computer applications. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 148 8086 and 8088 Assembler Programming I

This course examines the architecture and instruction set of the INTEL 8086 and 8088 chips used on the IBM-PC. Topics include: machine execution; addressing; input/output; arithmetic; branching, and control instructions. Students use the IBM-PC macro assembler to code and debug typical business applications. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 160 Computers, Society and Technology

This is an introductory course that provides students with the knowledge to stay current and informed in a technology-oriented, global society. Students will receive instruction in basic computer concepts and terminology, the fundamentals of the Windows operating system and have hands-on experience at the beginning to intermediate level using Microsoft Excel and Access. The Internet will be used to supplement textbook and lecture materials. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for BCS 102 or 202. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 185 Programming in Visual Basic

The Visual Basic language is used to develop Windows applications in a fast, reliable and efficient manner. This course will present the main components of a Visual Basic program, and will use these components to develop increasingly more complex Windows applications. The standard Windows forms and controls will be explored in providing the skills and knowledge necessary to write these event driven graphical interfaces. BCS 101 cannot be taken concurrently with BCS 185. Prerequisite(s): BCS 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 202 Computer Applications for Business/Sport Management

In this course students will learn the fundamentals of computer applications for business including sport management. This course will cover file management and have hands on experience at the beginning through advanced level using microcomputer spreadsheet and database applications. Students will use a spreadsheet program to enter formulas, create charts, execute functions and macros, create, sort and query lists, create pivot tables, create templates, and work with multiple worksheets and workbooks. Students will use a database program to create data table structures, queries, reports, and forms, create switchboards, pivot tables, and pivot charts. Please note: This course may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the B.S. in Computer Programming and Information degree. Students completing this course may not receive credit for SMT 202. Prerequisite(s): BCS 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 208 Introduction to Networks

This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IPv4 and IPv6 addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LAN’s, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience configuring equipment needed to build a LAN. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing Credits: 3 (2,2)

BCS 209 Routing and Switching Essentials

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience configuring routers, switches and basic WAN connectivity. Prerequisite(s): BCS 208 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (2,3)

BCS 215 UNIX Operating Systems

This course develops the fundamental knowledge of computer operating systems using UNIX. Topics include basic understanding of the UNIX system, utilizing the file system, programming language and security system. BCS 120 may be taken as a Prerequisite or Corequisite. Prerequisite(s): BCS 120 Corequisite(s): BCS 120 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 230 Foundations of Computer Programming II

This course expands the knowledge and skills of Foundations of Computer Programming I. Among the topics covered are: arrays, pointers, strings, classes, data abstraction, inheritance, composition and overloading. Prerequisite(s): BCS 120 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 232 Electronic Commerce

This cross-listed business management and business computer systems course covers electronic commerce (EC) foundations, retailing methodologies, and marketing research. Focus will be on the various forms, strategies, and implementations of EC including business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C), and consumer-to-consumer (C2C). Also covered will be social networking, electronic payment systems, and public policy issues including privacy and intellectual property matters as well as recent information technology advancements. Students completing BCS 232 may not receive credit for BUS 232. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 and BCS 101 or BCS 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 235 JavaScript and jQuery

This course introduces students to JavaScript and jQuery. Students will learn how to write their own scripts in JavaScript, learn jQuery syntax, and use the jQuery and jQuery UI libraries. Students will learn how to devise jQuery and jQuery UI scripting techniques such as effects, animation, tabbed panels, menus, accordions, content sliders, drag and drop, tooltips, date pickers, custom tooltips, dialogs and portlets, and interactive image sliders and carousels. Students who have taken BCS 250 cannot receive credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): BCS 130 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 237 Intermediate COBOL Programming

This course expands the skills and knowledge of computer programming using COBOL. Topics to be covered include multi-level control break processing, file handling techniques for both sequential and indexed files, table processing, and searching and sorting methods. Prerequisite(s): BCS 136 with a grade of C or higher or DPR 136 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 240 Website Development II

In this course, students will learn how to create websites that deliver a seamless experience across a diverse range of desktop and mobile devices using the same code base. In addition, students will learn how to perform forms validation, create navigation and menuing systems, build responsive layouts with flexible content, code media queries, and create and modify template and child pages. Students will use CSS 3 to create user interfaces with toolbars, animations, buttons, forms, lists, events, and themes. Prerequisite(s): BCS 130 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 255 Operating Systems

This course develops the fundamental knowledge of computer operating systems. Topics included in this study are types of operating systems, facilities and features of the different systems and user techniques. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 260 Introduction to Database Systems

This course provides the fundamental knowledge of database concepts. Topics studied will include the history and advantages of database systems, and the process of database design including entity-relationship diagrams and database normalization. Students will have hands-on experience using SQL (Structured Query Language). Prerequisite(s): BCS 120 and BCS 160 all with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 262 Data Communications

This course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of computer networking and its role in the business world today. Topics include: history of networking and applications, voice and data communications, hardware, transmission, network topologies, network analysis, the OSI model, design, implementation and management issues. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 285 Advanced Programming Visual Basic

This course provides an in-depth study of the skills and knowledge of Visual Basic programming. It is intended to reinforce and build upon the introductory Visual Basic by extending coverage of the programming language and introducing more advanced features of the language. Some of the advanced topics covered will include multitier applications, database programming, programming for the web and web forms, using report mechanisms, object- oriented terminology, creating classes and instantiating objects. Prerequisite(s): BCS 185 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 300 Management Information Systems

Managers have increasing responsibility for determining their information system needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support these needs. Management information systems integrate, for purposes of information requirements, the accounting, finance, and operations management functions of an organization. This course will examine the various levels and types of software and information systems required by an organization to integrate these functions. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or BUS 111 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 301 Systems Analysis and Design

This course explores the major issues in the analysis and design of a system, including methods of data collection, information requirements analysis, and the analysis process are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the user in the design process and focuses on approaches that improve the successful implementation of a computer system. Topics include general systems theory, Systems Development Life Cycle, data flow diagrams, data dictionary, hardware and software evaluation, feasibility analysis, CASE tools and prototyping. Students are required to demonstrate their skill in using project management and diagramming application software. Note: Credit cannot be given for both BCS 265 and BCS 301. Prerequisite(s): BCS 120 with a grade of C or higher and Junior Level Status. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 302 Systems Analysis and Design II

This is an advanced course in Systems Analysis and Design. Students will utilize the tools covered in BCS 301 to analyze system designs. Topics covered in the design phase will include input, output, and database and user interface design. A CASE Tool and/or other rapid application development tools will be used to create the interfaces. Additional topics in the implementation and maintenance phases will include testing, implementation and maintenance. Object-oriented systems and UML will also be covered. Students will analyze and prepare various case projects and will present and document their results. Prerequisite(s): BCS 301 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 303 XML

Students will be introduced to the basic intermediate concepts of XML, the Extensible Markup Language. Students will learn how to create the XML document, work with name- spaces, Document Type Definitions, and XML schemas. In addition, students will also use the advanced features of XML, such as XPath and the XSLT stylesheet language to transform XML documents. Prerequisite(s): BCS 130 and BCS 120 all with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 305 Data Visualization

Data visualization describes any effort to help people understand the significance of data by placing it in a visual context. Patterns, trends and correlations that might go undetected in text-based or spreadsheet data are recognized using data visualization software. In this course, students will use data visualization software to display data using infographics, dials and gauges, geographic maps, spark lines, and heat maps, as well as creating detailed bar, pie, and fever charts. These maps and charts will include interactive capabilities, enabling users to manipulate the data or drill into the data for querying and analysis. Prerequisite(s): BCS 300 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 311 Local Area Networks and Server Administration

This course will provide an introduction to local area networking concepts. These ideas will be explored in conjunction with an introduction to the concepts and tools necessary to implement, administer and troubleshoot the Microsoft Windows network. Hands-on experience will be used in the presentation of system administration tools. Prerequisite(s): BCS 262 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 315 UNIX Operating Systems II

This course further develops the knowledge of UNIX with an emphasis on the practice skills required to deploy and administer modern Unix and Linux systems. Topics include selecting and installing operating systems, adding users, virtualization, and the configuration and management of storage, networks and servers. Particular stress is paid system administration practices that foster the creation and maintenance of scalable and secure systems. Prerequisite(s): BCS 215 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 316 PERL Programming

This course provides an introduction to programming in the Perl language. Students will learn the Pearl syntax, the basics of using regular expressions, how to use Pearl data types, and how to access and manipulate files. Students are also introduced to database connectivity and debugging techniques. Prerequisite(s): BCS 215 and BCS 230 all with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 317 Enterprise Resource Planning

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is an organizational and information systems approach that integrates planning, customer relationship management, decision making, master scheduling, material requirements planning, marketing, forecasting, sales, finance, electronic commerce, and human resources. The course will include lectures and extensive use of supporting ERP software. Note: Students who have previously completed IND 313 cannot receive credit for BUS/ BCS 313. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BUS 317. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 318 Virtualization and Cloud Computing

This course explores installation, configuration, and management of VMware® vSphere™, which consists of VMware ESXi/ESX™ and VMware vCenter™Server. In addition, use of Virtualization Servers with Storage Area Networks and Network Attached Storage Technologies will be discussed. This advanced course prepares the student to understand OS virtualization, Storage Virtualization, and Cloud Computing. Prerequisite(s): BCS 215 and BCS 262 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 320 Scaling Networks

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 320. Prerequisite(s): BCS 209 with a C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 321 Connecting Networks

This course discusses the Wide Area Network (WAN) technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 321. Prerequisite(s): BCS 320 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 332 Fundamentals of Assembly Language Programming

This course provides an introduction to assembly language programming. Concepts discussed include basic computer organization and architecture, instruction set design, the call stack, data representation, addressing, and I/O. A number of programming assignments give students the opportunity to practice assembly language on one or more architectures chosen by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 340 Introduction to Algorithms

This course provides an introduction to efficient solutions for a variety of algorithmic problems commonly encountered in application programming. Problems are discussed and students are guided through the discovery of progressively more efficient solutions. Areas to be discussed may include trees, graphs, sorting, searching, and testing. Advanced techniques, including recursion, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms and parallel programming may be used to solve some of the problems. Small programming assignments will be required to illustrate an understanding of the details of the algorithms. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 345 JAVA Programming

This course is designed for students with some experience with programming. The syntax of the Java programming language, object-oriented programming, creating graphical user interfaces (GUI), exceptions, file input/output (I/O), and how to create Java applications and applets will be covered. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230 with grade of a C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 350 Web Database Development

This advanced course prepares the student to use database management systems with web server software to develop and maintain the information content of a web site. Students in the course should have prior knowledge of programming and database management systems. Prerequisite(s): BCS 260 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 351 Web Frameworks

In this course, students will use web frameworks, such as Bootstrap and Angular JS, which are free, open-source front-end web frameworks for designing responsive, mobile-first websites and web applications. Students will gain experience using frameworks to design HTML, JavaScript, and CSS-based design templates for typography, forms, forms validation, buttons, navigation, site layout, and other interface components, as well as optional JavaScript extensions. Prerequisite(s): BCS 130, BCS 235 both with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 360 Programming in SQL

The second in a two course sequence applies the knowledge of BCS260 to administer and implement relational database systems. Topics covered may include: embedded SQL and other mixed language mechanisms; PL/SQL; advanced/optimized SQL queries; transaction management including concurrency and recovery; schema refinement; higher-level normal forms; integrity; security; and database administration. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230, BCS 260 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 370 Data Structures

This course will present sequential and linked representations of various built-in and abstract data structures including arrays, records, stacks, queues and trees. Algorithms will be developed relating to various sorting and searching techniques, merging and recursion. A high-level structured programming language, such as C, using both static and dynamic storage concepts, will be used in exploring and developing these algorithms. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 372 Foundations of Theoretical Computer Science

Computer science theory has implications both for what problems programmers choose to solve and for how they solve them. This course introduces students who are familiar with the craft of programming to the underlying theory. Topics discussed include selections from automata theory, computability theory, and complexity theory. Prerequisite(s): BCS 230, MTH 30 and Junior or Senior Status Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 375 Legal and Ethical Issues in Database and System Administration

In response to privacy concerns and the growth of big data, governments have instituted legal restrictions on access to and on storage of certain forms of data, for example health records. This course explores ethical and legal issues relating to computers, with a particular emphasis on the ethical and legal obligations of system administrators and others with extraordinary access to personal data stored on computers. Prerequisite(s): BCS 215, EGL 102 and Junior Status Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 378 Information Security

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of computer and network security. Topics covered include fundamental concepts and principles of computer security, basic cryptography, public key infrastructure, authentication and access control, threats and vulnerabilities, intrusion detection/prevention systems and network security, operating system security, software and data security, web security, and managerial and ethical issues in computer security. Prerequisite(s): BCS 262 and BCS 230 all with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 380 Advanced Database Programming

This course will provide a detailed examination of a relational database management system and its procedural language such as Oracle and PL/SQL or SQL Server and T-SQL. General programming concepts such as conditional and iterative control, error handling and built-in exceptions will be discussed. Covered in more detail will be topics such as cursors, triggers, and the stored functions, procedures and packages. These topics will then be explored through laboratory assignments using a RDBMS such as Oracle or SQL server. Prerequisite(s): BCS 360 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 390 Database Administration and Security

This course provides the knowledge necessary to handle database administration and database security. Topics studied may include installation and configuration of a database, managing and securing user resources and privileges, data integrity, networking, optimization, and backup and recovery. Hands-on activities with a major commercial DBMS will be assigned to complement the lectures and written work and to develop practical skills. Prerequisite(s): BCS 260 and BCS 215 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 405 IS Development Project Management

This course will cover Project Management tools and techniques for Systems Development projects. Students will learn Project Management, Scope Management, Time Management, Cost Management, Quality Management, Human Resource Management and Communications Management all in the context of running successful information systems development and implementation projects. MS project will be used as a tool to managing all of these areas. Prerequisite(s): BCS 300 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 410 Computer Architecture

Computer Architecture is the study of hardware and software components of business information systems. Thorough understanding of the workings of the digital computer system is expected. Topics include: hardware components, the machine cycle, binary arithmetic, systems software, and assembly language. These topics are evaluated with respect to their impact on the development of business information systems. Two semesters of a programming language required. Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of a programming language required with a grade of C or higher and BCS 262 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 413 Advanced Enterprise Resource Planning

This advanced-level Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) course includes high-level information technology coverage of Scheduling, Planning, MRP, Logistics, Warehousing, Procurement, Quality, Vendor Management, Cost Accounting, Forecasting, KPI, Supply Chain, and Customer Resource Management. Also covered are concepts and software applications pertaining to product design, development, manufacturing (production), marketing, sales, and field service. This course emphasizes proficiency in the skill sets typically required within industry practices. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 or BCS 300 and (BUS 317 or BCS 317) Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 415 Operating System Internals and Design

This course will involve the study of the fundamentals of operating systems design and implementation. The concepts covered include process management, memory management, file systems, I/O system management, distributed systems, and security. Students will examine how these concepts are found in several current open-source operating systems, including Vista, UNIX and/or Linux. Prerequisite(s): BCS 215 and BCS 230 all with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 420 Client/Server Computing

Included in this course are a wide range of issues, methods, techniques and case examples for developing and managing client/server and distributed systems. These include client/ server development using (RAD) methodologies, transaction process monitors, types of aboveware and middleware, middleware standards (DCE,RPC and CORBA), managing client/server environments, software installation and distribution, electronic mail architectures in C/S products. Prerequisite(s): BCS 260 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 421 Android Mobile Application Development

This course provides an introduction to Android mobile application development. Techniques for designing the user interface will be discussed. The Android application lifecycle and issues related to battery life will be covered. Storing application data using a database will be explored. Students will receive hands-on experience using the Android mobile application development platform. Prerequisite(s): BCS 345 with a C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 422 iOS Mobile Application Development

This course provides an introduction to iOS mobile application development for Apple devices. Students will be introduced to the Swift programming language. Emphasis will be placed on good programming practices, on object oriented techniques, and on using established design patterns for mobile applications. Students will receive hands-on experience using the Xcode development environment to build example apps. Basic instruction in Objective-C will provide students with the ability to read and reuse legacy iOS code. Prerequisite(s): BCS 345 or BCS 370 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 425 Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing

Business Intelligence is the transformation of data into actionable information. This information is used by businesses to drive high-level decision making. This course is concerned with extracting data from the information systems that deal with the day-to-day operations and transforming it into data that can be used for decision making. Students will learn how to design and create a data warehouse, and how to utilize the process of extracting, transforming, and loading (ETL) data into data warehouses. Students will design and construct dynamic reports using the data warehouse and multi-dimensional online analytical processing (OLAP) cubes as the data source. Prerequisite(s): BCS 260 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 426 C# Programming

This course is an introduction to the C# (“C-Sharp”) programming language for students with existing programming experience. The course covers the syntax of the C# programming language, .NET (“dot net”) infrastructure, creating graphical user interfaces, using databases, using web services, and multithreading. Students will be required to complete a number of practical programming assignments to solidify their knowledge of the language and its application. Prerequisite(s): BCS 345 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 427 Game Programming

This course provides an introduction to two-dimensional game programming. Students will learn how to draw and manage game objects. Techniques for adding sound to a game will be discussed. Creation of computer controlled game objects will also be covered. Students will receive hands-on experience with a current game development platform. Students will be expected to create their own two-dimensional game by the end of the course. Prerequisite(s): BCS 345 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 428 Large Software System Development

This course introduces students to the tools and processes used in software development for large systems. Through the use of open source projects, the students will explore the build environment, version control, and the testing tools used to produce code involving large numbers of programmers and product managers. Programming project management techniques, such as Agile, and best practices for programming will also be introduced and discussed. Prerequisite(s): BCS 345 and BCS 370 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 430W Senior Project (Writing Intensive)

The primary objective of this course is to give Computer Programming and Information Systems students an opportunity to integrate techniques and concepts acquired in their other courses. Elements will be drawn primarily from BCS301 (Systems Analysis and Design) and BCS260 (Database), in addition to other courses in the student's selected track of study. The course is experiential in nature i.e. the student will be required to produce results for use by real individuals and will be evaluated both on process and product. In addition to prerequisites, a second level programming course with a grade of C or better, and Senior level standing is required. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for BSC 430 and 430W; BCS 430W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Computer Programming and Info Systems Department. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101, BCS 260, BCS 230 and BCS 301 all with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 440 CPIS Internship

In this course, the student works under the tutelage of a professional who serves as site supervisor in an organization that provides information services. The work done by the student is guided by learning objectives agreed to by the site supervisor, the faculty member and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports, and a final report on their experience to the client and to the department. The course offers an ideal opportunity to test theory in practice and to gain experience in a realistic information provision situation. The experience is expected to be mutually beneficial for the organization and student. Prerequisite(s): Junior Status and GPA >=3.0. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

BCS 450 Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems

Courses that range from 450-451 will cover topics not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from term to term and reflect the interests of students, faculty and industry. Topics may include wireless communications, rapid application development and other emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 451 Special Topics

Courses that range from 450-451 will cover topics not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from term to term and reflect the interests of students, faculty and industry. Topics may include wireless communications, rapid application development and other emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BCS 460 Independent Study

This is an independent study course designed to offer the student experience in research of a specialized area of interest. The student will have an opportunity to work individually or with a group in designing, developing and presenting a research project. The topic must be approved by a faculty member. Students will be required to submit full documentation and present their final results. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIOLOGY

BIO 120 General Biology

A survey of life from the standpoint of humans, including structural and behavioral evolution, functional characteristics, and relationship to the natural world. Recent developments in Biology are explored, including applications of DNA analysis and recombinant DNA technology. The laboratory exercises involve simple investigations of the life processes by utilizing basic research tools. A range of life forms are studied in the laboratory, with particular emphasis on animals ranging from planaria to preserved frogs. Note: BIO 120 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 120L is a part of your grade for this course. Corequisite(s): BIO 120L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 121 Health, Heredity, and Behavior

Health, Heredity, and Behavior is a 3 credit, non-lab course. It focuses on the most common and clinically significant diseases and conditions that afflict modern developed societies, first building a foundation of the basic anatomy and physiology necessary to understand the disorder, then exploring the experiences of the people afflicted. The inherited and lifestyle risks associated with disorder are discussed and strategies to reduce those risks are investigated. This course is appropriate for non-science majors. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 123 Human Body in Health and Disease

This course is an inquiry into the mechanism of diseases that plague human beings. A systemic approach is taken in which all the major systems of the human body and the significant diseases that affect those systems are studied. Emphasis is on failures of homeostasis as the basic mechanisms of disease. Included are discussions on available treatments and therapies, the impact of new technological developments, and maintaining health and avoiding disease. The laboratory component contains both traditional and computer-generated exercises, which illustrate the onset and development of a variety of diseases and pathological states. Note: BIO 123 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 123L is a part of your grade for this course. Corequisite(s): BIO 123L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 125 Principles of Nutrition

This course provides a basic background in the nature and biochemical function of essential and non-essential nutrients, the molecular basis of metabolism and nutrient requirements of living cells and organisms. The role of nutrients in gene expression, genetically modified foods and the role of diet in the treatment of diseases. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 130 Biological Principles I

This course deals with biological processes primarily at the molecular and cellular level, and develops the foundations of evolutionary and ecological concepts. There is a study of cell structure, and an examination of cellular composition and metabolic processes including enzyme activity, respiration, and photosynthesis. Principles of genetics are studied at the cellular and molecular level, with reference to current techniques in molecular biology. Evolutionary mechanisms are introduced and ecological concepts are presented as a unifying theme. Note: BIO 130 is the first course in the required two-semester introductory sequence in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 130L is a part of your grade for this course. Corequisite(s): BIO 130L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 131 Biological Principles II

This course deals with biological processes primarily at the organismal level, and examines the diversity of living things. The origins and adaptations of the Prokaryota, Protista, and Fungi are explored, with emphasis on their ecological roles, economic value, and medical significance. Plant life cycles are introduced, and plant structure, physiology, and utilization are studied. The evolution and adaptations of various animal phyla are presented, with a consideration of structure and function in each; organ systems are studied with emphasis on humans as representative vertebrates. Note: BIO 131 is the second course in the required two-semester introductory in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 131L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 Corequisite(s): BIO 131L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 135 Marine Science

Marine Science is designed to give the student an appreciation and understanding of the dynamics and interactions of the various components (biological, chemical, physical, geological) of the world's oceans. Habitats studied will range from near shore estuarine systems to deep ocean systems. Special consideration will be given to the human use and manipulation of the Long Island coastal zone. Laboratory sessions will include methodologies used in oceanographic sampling and analysis as well as exercises reinforcing lecture material. Field trips will also play an important part of the course work supporting lecture topics. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 135L is a part of your grade for this course. Corequisite(s): BIO 135L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 166 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology

This is a one semester integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology, covering the major physiological and morphological relationships of the human organ systems. The design of this course is appropriate preparation for Dental Hygiene, Medical Laboratory Technology, and certain other allied health professions, but it does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum. The major theme of the course is the integrative pathways and regulatory processes that maintain the homeostasis of the body. Note: BIO 166 does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 170 or BIO 171. It is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as lower-level laboratory science elective within Liberal Arts. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 166L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): High School biology with a lab or BIO 120 or 123 or 130; High School or College chemistry recommended. Corequisite(s): BIO 166L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 170 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy and Physiology I are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 170 and BIO 270. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 170L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): High School biology with a lab or BIO 120 or 123 or 130; High School or College chemistry recommended Corequisite(s): BIO 170L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy and Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems. Note: students may not receive credit for both BIO 171 and BIO 271. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 171L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170 Corequisite(s): BIO 171L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 192 Botany

An introduction to the biology of plants and their ancestors. Topics include cell structure and function, cell chemistry, photosynthesis and cellular respiration. The tissues, roots, stems and leaves are studied covering such topics as conduction, absorption, translocation and reproduction. A phylogenetic comparison among plant groups and their ancestors is the underlying theme. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 192L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance is the laboratory course is required. Corequisite(s): BIO 192L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 193 Zoology

An introduction to the biology of animals and their ancestors. Topics include structure and function of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems in animals. Genetics, development, behavior, ecology, and the evolution of major phyla are covered. A comparative approach is taken in studying the invertebrates and vertebrates including man. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 193L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Corequisite(s): BIO 193L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 197 Human Biology

An introductory course that teaches biological principles by emphasizing the structural and functional aspects of the human body, especially as they relate to everyday existence. Includes discussion of important collateral issues such as the nature and course of disease, smoking and health, drug abuse, immunity and allergy, human genetics, birth-control, over-population, and sexually transmitted disease. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 198 Entomology

The nature, structure, growth, and habits of insects and related forms are discussed. The beneficial and injurious effects of insects are covered. Recent breakthroughs and developments in the field of entomology are discussed. Skills are developed which enable the student to identify insect plant pests, diseases and injuries. Control measures and application equipment are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the various pest management options available to the homeowner and professionals in the field. IPM (integrated pest management) involves an understanding of pesticides, physical and mechanical controls, biological controls, cultural controls, and legal controls. Laws regulating the activities of pest control operators and the application of hazardous pesticides are discussed. A collection of insects and related forms is required. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 198L is a part of your grade for this course. Corequisite(s): BIO 198L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 210 Introduction to Bioscience

Moving beyond the basic concepts of general biology, this class explores how biology is used in both academic and commercial settings within the fields of biotechnology, pharmaceutical and clinical sciences. Topics will include: applications of biotechnology in microbes, plants, and animals, the human genome project and its relation to medical biotechnology, DNA forensics, and pharmaceutical drug discovery, delivery, and FDA approval. The debate surrounding subjects such as cloning, stem cells, and genetically modified foods will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 with a grade of C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 212 Bioscience Laboratory Practices

This course is designed to enable students to develop understanding of and proficient technical ability in basic bioscience laboratory practices. There is an in-depth presentation of laboratory safety standards, utilization of material safety data sheets, and the theoretical basis for a full range of preparatory and analytical methods and the opportunity to develop expertise in these methods with a variety of laboratory equipment. Students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook, analyze and display data in graphic form, and report results in a standard format. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 with a grade of C- or higher Corequisite(s): BIO 212L Credits: 2 (1,2)

BIO 220 Medical Microbiology

The role of microbes as causative agents of disease in human hosts; the morphological characterization of pathogenic species, classification of communicable diseases and epidemiological aspects. Host-parasite relationship, infection, and host-resistance mechanisms; sero-diagnostic methods in medical practice. Chemotherapy, mode of action of antibiotics, sterilization, disinfection methods and contamination control. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 220L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 166 or 170 or 171 or 130 or 131 Corequisite(s): BIO 220L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 235 Marine Biology

The ecological principles of the marine environment will be examined. There will be an emphasis on the classification, identification and economic importance of both the animals (Protozoa-Chordata) and the algae (microscopic and macroscopic). The flora and fauna of the Long Island region will be stressed with field trips and collections being an integral part of the course. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 235L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 or 131 or 192 Corequisite(s): BIO 235L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 240 Bioethics

This course will cover ethical issues raised as a result of modern advances in biotechnology which directly affect the quality of human life. Bioethics comprises every possible aspect of health care: medical, moral, political, religious, legal and financial. It scrutinizes outmoded laws and deals with the enormous growth in available medical services. It takes into account our views of ourselves as members of a humane society. Note: This course is also offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the department. Students cannot get credit for BIO 240 and BIO 240W. Prerequisite(s): One semester of college biology with a C- or higher; for the writing intensive version, EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher is also required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 256 Environmental Sampling & Analysis

Proper field techniques for sampling the water, land, and air environments will be emphasized. Laboratory procedures will involve the analysis of both chemical and biological parameters, including wastewater analysis, using New York State approved methodology. Vegetative transecting and beach contouring will also be included. Data presentation and report writing will be emphasized. Field trips and study will be an integral and required part of this course. Discussion of environmental laws and impact statements will be included. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 256L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): One semester of college biology with a laboratory and one semester of college chemistry with a laboratory. Corequisite(s): BIO 256L Credits: 3 (2,3)

BIO 270 Anatomy and Physiology I

BIO 270 is a course in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate for students with a strong foundation in basic biological principles. Anatomy and Physiology I includes: anatomical and directional terminology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. Note: The required course sequence for nursing students is BIO 170 and 171. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 170 and BIO 270. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 270L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 or equivalent with a C- or higher Corequisite(s): BIO 270L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 271 Anatomy and Physiology II

BIO 271 is a course in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate for students with a strong foundation in basic biological principles. Anatomy & Physiology II includes: the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and immune systems, metabolism, and acid-base balance. Note: The required course sequence for nursing students is BIO 170 and 171. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 171 and BIO 271. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 271L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130 or equivalent with a C- or higher Corequisite(s): BIO 271L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 290 Entomology II

Methods of greenhouse pest and disease control, including identification of major families of pests, diagnosis of diseases, principles of cultural and chemical control, and a survey of pests and diseases associated with economically important greenhouse crops. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 290L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 198 or 192 Corequisite(s): BIO 290L Credits: 3 (2,2)

BIO 294 Vertebrate Physiology

This course investigates the principles of physiology in vertebrates with emphasis on mechanism of integration and homeostasis at the cellular, organ and system level. It explores the comparative, experimental and evolutionary aspects of all vertebrate classes and surveys the impact of recent advances in cellular and molecular biology on this branch of the biological sciences. Corequisite(s): BIO 295L Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 295L Vertebrate Physiology (Lab)

This laboratory course is an inquiry into the experimental methods and models for understanding vertebrate physiology. It will explore the comparative, experimental and evolutionary aspects of the mechanisms of integration and homeostasis among select vertebrate classes. Laboratory exercises incorporate computer software-based exercises with classic physiology experiments designed to illustrate both the basic concepts of physiology as well as the comparative nature of these events in a number of vertebrate species. Corequisite(s): BIO 294 Credits: 1 (0,3)

BIO 330 Principles of Ecology

The course introduces the student to the nature of ecosystems, community organization and dynamics, and population growth and regulation through the understanding and use of modern ecological techniques. The laboratory will be primarily focused on the analysis of field data collected by students. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 330L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110, BIO 131 with a C- or higher and Junior Status Corequisite: BIO 330L Credits: 4 (3,2)

BIO 335 Plant Systematics

An introduction to systematics using vascular plants as the model organisms. Lecture material for this course will cover all aspects of systematics from basic nomenclature, taxonomy and systematic methods through modern molecular systematics and cladistics. Lab material will cover plant morphology and the identification of characteristics across plant lineages and their relationship to systematics. Note: The laboratory course, BIO 355L is a part of your grade for this course Prerequisite(s) BIO 131 or BIO 192 or BIO 198 with a C- or higher and Junior Status. Corequisite(s): BIO 335L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 340 Biopharmaceutical Regulation

This course introduces the student to Current Good Laboratory Practice (cGCP), Current Good Clinical Practice (cGCP) and Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) as defined in the Code of federal Regulations Title 21. These regulations apply to all aspects of testing, clinical trials and manufacturing of Biopharmaceutical products under the authority of the Food and Drug Administration. The course will examine the application of these regulations to the bioprocessing, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and allied industries. Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 with grade of a C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 343 Principles of Genetics

A thorough study of Genetics intended for majors in the Bioscience Curriculum. Topics to be covered include cytogenetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics. Computer simulations and demonstrations will present genetic principles. Students will utilize computerized databases to complete independent genomic search assignments. Note: Bioscience and/or MLT students taking BIO 343 must also take BIO 344L either during the same semester or after completion of BIO 343. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130, BIO 131, BIO 210, BIO 212, and MTH 110 all with a grade of C- or higher or BIO 130, MLT 227, and MTH 110 all with a grade of C- or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 344L Principles of Genetics Lab

Laboratory exercises include both computer simulations and the use of living organisms to illustrate genetic principles and techniques. Students will collect data utilizing standard genetics investigational techniques. Note: BIO 343 is a prerequisite OR a corequisite for this course. BIO 343 must be taken either prior to or during the same semester as BIO 344L. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130, BIO 131, BIO 210 and BIO 212 and MTH 110 all with a grade of C- or higher or BIO 130, MLT 227 and MTH 110 all with a grade of C- or higher. Corequisite(s): BIO 343 Credits: 1 (0,3)

BIO 345 Introduction to Bioinformatics

This course is intended to teach the basic tools used in bioinformatics in order to investigate biological questions. Students will conduct independent projects utilizing existing computer programs and databases for gene searches, sequence comparisons, and phylogenetic analysis. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343, BIO 344L and BCS 101 or BCS 102 all with a grade of C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 348 Cell Biology

This course investigates how cells develop, work, communicate, and control their activities. Topics include basic biochemistry and metabolism, DNA structure and function, membrane/organelle function and transport, cell communication, the cytoskeleton, and cell division. At the completion of this course the student should be able to engage in the broad themes of cell and molecular biology, and to relate these concepts to other studies in biology and other disciplines. Note: Bioscience and/or MLT students taking BIO 348 must also take BIO 349L either during the same semester or after completion of BIO 348. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130, 131, 210 and 212 or (BIO 130 and MLT 227) all with a grade of C- or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 349L Cell Biology (Lab)

This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of protocols routinely used in research laboratories investigating cell structure and function. Students have the opportunity to use both common and high tech instruments to perform weekly laboratory exercises. Experimental design, controls and data presentation and analysis are emphasized. Note: BIO 348 is a prerequisite OR a co-requisite for this course. BIO 348 must be taken either prior to or during the same semester as BIO 349L. Prerequisite(s): BIO 130, 131, 210 and 212 or (BIO 130 and MLT 227) all with a grade of C- or higher Corequisite(s): BIO 348 Credits: 1 (0,3)

BIO 353 Essentials of Plant Pathology

The study of the development of plant diseases caused by Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Virolds. Major diseases of economically important plants are emphasized. The disease process and disease cycles for representative pathogens are covered in relation to plant disease control methods. Prerequisite(s): BIO 192 with a grade of C- or higher and Junior Status Corequisite(s): BIO 354L Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 354L Essentials of Plant Pathology (Lab)

The laboratory is designed to enable the student to acquire skills in collection and examination methods used for the diagnosis of plant diseases produced by biotic and abiotic agents, using microbial isolation and culturing techniques where applicable. The student will learn to recognize and identify (directly or indirectly) biotic plant pathogens among the Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Viroids. Prerequisite(s): BIO 192 with a grade of C- or higher and Junior Status Corequisite(s): BIO 353 Credits: 1 (0,2)

BIO 355 Ecological Topics: The Structure and Function of Nature

This course introduces students to basic ecological concepts as they relate to the biotic and abiotic environment. It stresses the diversity of life and the impact that man, other organisms and environment have on each other. Laboratory exercises and field work will investigate the effects organisms have on each other as well as the effects of environmental conditions on growth and development. Students will also characterize the nature of selected site(s) in terms of species diversity using plot sampling techniques. Seminar type discussions require individuals or small groups to explore environmental issues. Topics for these discussions will be submitted to the instructor for appropriateness and approval. Students will be required to research and prepare a paper as well as make a presentation to the class. The class will be given the opportunity to question each speaker following that individual's presentation. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 355L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 131 or BIO 192 or BIO 198 with a grade of C- or higher and Junior Status. Corequisite(s): BIO 355L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 360 Principles of Immunobiology

Students will be introduced to basic concepts of innate and adaptive immunity. They will study the cellular and non-cellular components of the immune system including molecules involved in the recognition, uptake, and clearance of antigenic material. They will gain insight into how the immune system acts to eliminate bodily threats, functions to prevent unnecessary activity when threats are not present (steady-state), and secures lack of immunity toward self-tissue (tolerance). Students will also review and discuss current scientific literature related to immunity and health. Prerequisite(s): BIO 348 and BIO 349L with a grade of C- or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 365 Neurology of Pain

BIO 365 is a comprehensive study of the various neurogenic mechanisms central to the study and understanding of pain is the focus of this lecture-based course. In addition, Clinical neuroanatomy and physiology will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on organic/root causes of pain pertaining to symptom specific generators. Also, a broad base review will be aimed at exploring the psychodynamic components of pain. This includes, but is not limited to topics in addiction, brain reward cascades, and arousal mechanisms. The final portion of this course includes discussion of the various methods of pain mitigation and measurement. Strong clinical applications will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): (BIO 130 or BIO 170 with a grade of C- or higher) and (Junior Status or BIO 220 with a grade of C- or higher) Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 380 Pre-Professional Experience I

Recommended students will engage in one of the following for at least 135 hours: 1) health care volunteer work that involves patient assistance in the health care environment; 2) shadowing of a health care professional (physician, physician assistant, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dentist, veterinarian etc...). The final grade is assigned by the Internship Coordinator based on consultation with the supervisor/health professional and evaluation of reports, logs and a final report prepared by the student. Students must submit a resume to the internship coordinator at least 3 months before registering for the course. Prerequisite(s): Junior Status in Bioscience and (BIO 130 and 131) or BIO 166 or (BIO 170 and BIO 171) or BIO 220 or BIO 414 with a grade of C- or higher, recommendation by two Biology faculty members, submission of a resume to the Internship Coordinator at least 3 months prior to registering for the course, approval of the Internship Coordinator; additional courses in Human Anatomy and Physiology and/or Medical Microbiology recommended for some sites. Credits: 3 (0,9)

BIO 381 Pre-Professional Experience II

Recommended for students engaged in one of the following for at least 135 hours: 1) health care volunteer work that involves patient assistance in the health care environment; 2) shadowing of a health care professional (physician, physician assistant, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dentist, veterinarian, etc.) The final grade is assigned by the Internship Coordinator based on consultation with the supervisor/health professional and evaluation of reports, logs, and a final report prepared by the student. Prerequisite(s): BIO 380 with a grade of B or higher. Credits: 3 (0,9)

BIO 414 Microbiology

Based on contemporary applications of microbiology, this course is designed to present both fundamental concepts of microbial physiology and growth as well as microbial control measures ranging from asepsis to antibiosis. The role of microorganisms in natural ecosystems, research, manufacturing and human infection will be explored, with emphasis on prokaryotic genetics and metabolism. Mechanisms of evolution will be discussed within the context of emerging pathogens and novel bioengineered organisms. The dynamics between the human microbiome and resistance to infection will be presented along with basic epidemiological models. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 414L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 210, 212 and (343 and 344L) with a grade of C- or higher Corequisite(s): BIO 414L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 415 Human Virology

This course will focus on specific human viruses, including papilloma, herpes, smallpox, polio, measles, HIV, influenza, SARS, and hepatitis viruses. Lecture will cover viral strategies of invasion, viral lifecycles, viral offense and host defense, prevention and control of viral diseases, approaches for studying viruses and public health. Prerequisite(s): BIO 348 and 349L with a grade of C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 420 Principles of Immunobiology

Immunobiology is a course in human immunology covering the concepts of innate and adaptive immunity and descriptions and functions of cellular and soluble factors involved in the immune response to eliminate infectious organisms. Concepts include mechanism for regulation of the immune response, how the immune system learns to discriminate between self and non-self, induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance and the development of immunological memory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 348 and BIO 349L with a grade of C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 441 Introduction to Molecular Biology

A detailed introduction to molecular biology, the course covers the techniques common to all molecular biology such as nucleic acid separation and visualization, PCR blotting, and sequencing. In addition, the course focuses on topics such as transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination. Each is presented from both the view of prokaryotes as well was eukaryotes. Scientific journal articles highlighting class topics will be used to supplement class lectures. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 441L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343 and 344L and BIO 348 and BIO 349L all with a grade of C- or higher. Corequisite(s): BIO 441L (3,4) Credits: 5 (3,4)

BIO 444 Forensic Molecular Biology

This course explores advanced molecular biological techniques and concepts as they apply to the study of forensic investigation. The course will cover background information on body fluid identification, DNA structure and function, analytical DNA techniques, and review advancements in the field of DNA typing. The primary focus will be the molecular biological technique known as short tandem repeats (STR) testing. Other topics covered include case studies, sample handling, DNA databanking (CODIS), mass disaster identification, Y chromosomal analysis, paternity testing, and validation procedures. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in techniques and experiments that are currently being employed by forensic biology laboratories across the country. Note: Students who have completed BIO 430 or CRJ 430 may not receive credit for this course. Note: the laboratory course, BIO 444L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 348, 349L and CRJ 201 all with a grade of C- or higher. Corequisite(s): BIO 444L Credits: 4 (3,3)

BIO 455 Validation and Regulatory Affairs

An introduction is provided to governmental oversight of drugs, devices and biotherapeutics, and the laws and regulations that apply to development, testing and validation of methods and equipment. There is a survey of the history of US food and drug law, the creation of the FDA, and the current organization and responsibilities of the FDA. Specific US laws and regulations applicable to drugs, devices and biologics and international regulations and import/export concerns are examined. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343 or BIO 348 with a grade of C- or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 460 Topics in Biology

A study of current discoveries and applications of biology, with emphasis on student participation and written assignments. Critical thinking will be developed concerning the validity of popular reports and extraordinary claims. Ongoing discoveries in biology will be analyzed according to their contributions to the advancement of knowledge, their possible commercial medical, or agricultural applications, and ethical issues that they may arise. Resources that will be utilized include current scientific literature, guest lectures, and the internet. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343, 344L, 348 and 349L with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 470 Bioscience Senior Seminar

The capstone course in the Bioscience Program, utilizes guest speakers and student literature searches to explore the state of the entire field of Bioscience. Each student is required to write a paper on an approved topic in the field of Bioscience based on primary sources in the scientific literature, and to present a seminar at which the student will defend his or her correlations and conclusions about the topic. Note: this course is also offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the department. Students cannot get credit for BIO 470 and BIO 470W. Prerequisite(s): BIO 343, 344L, 348 and 349L with a grade of C- or higher; for the writing intensive version, EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher is also required. Corequisite(s): BIO 441 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BIO 476L Bioscience Internship A1

Bioscience majors may be recommended for or invited into one or more assignments in the Bioscience Internship Series, with the course number selected according to the length of the internship and whether it is a first or subsequent internship. Bioscience Internships A1 and A2 (BIO 476 and 477) represent short preliminary projects for 45 hours earning 1 credit. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation and BIO 343 and BIO 344L or BIO 348 and BIO 349L all with a grade of C- or higher. Credits: 1 (0,0,3)

BIO 477L Bioscience Internship A2

Bioscience majors may be recommended for or invited into one or more assignments in the Bioscience Internship Series, with the course number selected according to the length of the internship and whether it is a first or subsequent internship. Bioscience Internships A1 and A2 (BIO 476 and 477) represent short preliminary projects for 45 hours earning 1 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): Previous Internship with a grade of B or higher, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation. Credits: 1 (0,0,3)

BIO 478L Bioscience Internship B1

Bioscience Internships B1 and B2 (BIO 478 and 479) represents intermediate projects for 90 hours earning 2 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation. Prerequisite(s): (BIO 343 and BIO 344L) and (BIO 348 and 349L) Credits: 2 (0,0,6)

BIO 479L Bioscience Internship B2

Bioscience Internships B1 and B2 (BIO 478 and 479) represent intermediate projects for 90 credits hours earning 2 credits Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 478L with a grade of B or higher Credits: 2 (0,0,6)

BIO 480L Bioscience Internship I

Bioscience Internship I, represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): (BIO 343 and BIO 344L) and (BIO 348 and 349L). Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation Corequisite(s): BIO 441 Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

BIO 481L Bioscience Internship II

Bioscience Internships II represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 480L with a grad of B or higher Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

BIO 482L Bioscience Internship III

Bioscience Internship III represents intermediate projects for 135 hours 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 481L with a grade of B or higher Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

BIO 483L Bioscience Internship IV

Bioscience Internship IV represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 482L with a grade of B or higher Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

BIO 484L Bioscience Internship V

Bioscience Internship V represents longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): (BIO 343 and BIO 344L) and (BIO 348 and 349L). Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation. Credits: 4 (0,0,12)

BIO 485L Bioscience Internship VI

Bioscience Internship VI represents longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 484L with a grade of B or higher Credits: 4 (0,0,12)

BIO 486L Bioscience Internship VII

Bioscience Internship VII represents longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Prerequisite(s): BIO 485L with a grade of B or higher Credits: 4 (0,0,12)

BIO 490 Bioscience

An intensive bioscience research experience for selected student in a research laboratory under the supervision of faculty engaged in current investigations in the field of bioscience. The student will be expected to commit himself / herself to a full weekly schedule of laboratory research activity and tutorials for a semester or summer to gain professional expertise in laboratory procedures, record keeping, operation of laboratory equipment, experimental design, and preparation of data for scientific publication presentation and oral presentation. Technical Elective for Bioscience majors. Prerequisite(s): Senior status and recommendation of faculty. Credits: 8 (4,0,12)

BUSINESS

BUS 101 Accounting I

Fundamental accounting concepts and principles are covered through an understanding of the following topics: accounting as an information system; analyzing a transaction; the accounting cycle; accounting for both service enterprises and merchandising businesses; deferrals and accruals; reversing entries; systems design; accounting for cash, receivables, temporary investments and inventory; payroll accounting. Students apply concepts to the preparation of special journals, subsidiary ledgers, worksheets and financial statements. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 102 Accounting II

Continued development of the principles and concepts introduced in Accounting I. The following topics are included: emphasis on further understanding of generally accepted accounting principles; plant assets; intangible assets; determination of depreciation, depletion and amortization; accounting for partnerships and corporations; long term liabilities; investments in bonds and stock; statement of cash flows; managerial accounting; accounting for manufacturing operations; budgeting and standard costs systems. Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 109 Management Theories and Practices

This introductory course covers management principles pertaining to human resources, individual behavior in organizations, employee motivation and performance, and business ethics. Topics also include managing and the manager’s job; planning and decision making; employee performance appraisal and feedback; leadership and influence processes; interpersonal relations and communication; and managing work groups and teams. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 111 Introduction to Business

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of American Business and its contemporary environment. It provides an overview of organizational, national, and international trends and their impact on enterprises both large and small. The course develops an understanding of important business concepts, principles, and practices that explain how businesses are formed, how they operate to accomplish their goals, and why/how their success depends on effective management, production, marketing and finance/accounting. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 121 Business Mathematics

The fundamentals of applied mathematics in the field of accounting, finance, marketing, and selling. Topics include interest, bank discount, insurance, and annuities. The use of arithmetic as a managerial tool is stressed. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 131 Marketing Principles

This course provides the student with a sound knowledge of the basic elements of the marketing process. Major topics include the features of consumer and organizational markets, market segmentation, and target market strategies. Product planning and development, brands, packaging and other product features are covered. Price determination and the use of various pricing strategies are discussed. The factors in the selection of channels of distribution and the features of wholesaling and retailing are considered. Elements of the promotional process such as sales, advertising, and sales promotion are included. Ethical and legal issues in marketing, marketing of services, global marketing, and marketing on the Internet are also covered. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 141 Contemporary Business Communications

An introduction to the role and importance of effective communications in business. Key topics include the familiarization and practice in preparing common types of internal and external business communications; contemporary issues in business communication relating to technology, ethics, and nondiscriminatory language; memo and report writing with proper mechanics, style, and appropriate tone/attitude; and business presentations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 and BCS 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 188 Advertising Art and Applications

This course will combine basic advertising principles with practical media application. This course shall introduce students to the business of advertising in a contemporary global environment. The course will explore concepts of advertising, including elements of media selection and copywriting within the parameters of internal budgets, management and the application of actual advertising creation. In addition, students will create advertising, integrating the roles of the creative director and marketing manager. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for VIS 188. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 201 Corporate Finance

The overall aim of this course is to help students develop an understanding and appreciation of Finance as a business discipline - an analytical approach in assessing the financial worthiness of a business entity is stressed. Topics covered include time value of money; financial statement analysis; valuation models; risks and rates of return; calculating beta coefficients; working capital management; capital budgeting; the cost of capital leverage and dividend policy; and financial forecasting. Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 and 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 202 Business Law I

An introduction to the nature and sources of law; the role the legal system; the law of torts and crimes; the law of contracts; and real and personal property. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 209 Teamwork and Team Building

The following topics will be discussed and analyzed: teams in organizations, understanding team building and development, working in groups and teams, team roles and processes, being a team leader, and handling team conflict. The culmination of these concepts and functions, referred to as "team forming, storming, norming, and performing," will also be covered. Case studies will be used extensively. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 220 Financial Information Systems

This course will further the understanding of accounting theory and will provide the opportunity to achieve competency in the use of computerized applications. The course will introduce students to internal control theory within a computerized financial information system. Use of the Web for accessing relevant information will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 Corequisite(s): BUS 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 230 Environmental Law

This elective course addresses concerns pertaining to the business environment, instructing students as to the unified ecological approach to which affect management. The political approach to business environmental concerns in the context of constitutional, common law and administrative law theories and case and statutory analysis are examined, referencing basic natural science technology. Designed as a first law course it introduces the business, horticulture and industrial technology student to the legal process applying relevant components of environmental law studies. A nationally adopted text of a major law publisher and contemporary business periodical articles on assigned topics are to be used extensively. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 232 Electronic Commerce

This cross-listed business management and business computer systems course covers electronic commerce (EC) foundations, retailing methodologies, and marketing research. Focus will be on the various forms, strategies, and implementations of EC including business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C) and consumer-to-consumer (C2C). Also covered will be social networking, electronic payment systems, and public policy issues including privacy and intellectual property matters as well as recent information technology advancements. Students completing BUS 232 may not receive credit for BCS 232. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or Management course and BCS 101 or BCS 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 240 Business Statistics

This course provides an understanding of statistical concepts and tools that are critical in business decision-making. The discussion and development of each topic is presented in an application setting, with the statistical results providing insights and solutions to real world problems. Students will be able to calculate and perform various analyses, including but not limited to: Interval Estimation, Hypothesis Testing, Test of Goodness of Fit, and Independence and Regression Analysis. The coursework requires extensive use of commercially available statistical software. Prerequisites: MTH 117 or MTH 129 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 250 Consumer Behavior

This course recognizes the central role of consumers in determining the fate of a firm's marketing efforts. Topics covered include the understanding of consumer motivation, perception, and learning, as well as the recognition of social influences on consumer behavior such as reference groups, opinion leadership, culture, and subcultures. Emphasis will be on the consumer's decision making process so that students can make more informed choices in the marketplace. Topics also include the methods marketers use to influence consumer behavior and corresponding ethical and legal issues. Prerequisite(s): BUS 131 or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 251 Retailing

This course helps students develop an understanding of the relationship of retailing to the marketing process and describes the fundamentals of modern retailing. A study is made of modern retail institutions. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 253 Industrial Marketing

This course focuses on the marketing of industrial goods and services to industrial markets. Industrial product planning, channels of distribution, promotional activities and pricing strategies are emphasized. Other topics such as understanding industrial buying and evaluating potential markets are also covered. Prerequisite(s): BUS 131 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 254 Salesmanship

This course emphasizes the creative selling techniques used by professional salespeople. It covers all the important elements of the personal selling process with special emphasis placed on determining prospects' needs, translating features into benefits, overcoming objections and closing methods. Participants will demonstrate their ability to apply the techniques discussed by delivering sales presentations. Prerequisite(s) BUS 131 or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 256 Sales Management

The major problems of sales management in the distribution of products and services; the selection, recruitment, and training of sales personnel; measurement of the effectiveness of salespeople, supervision and compensation of salespeople; sales quotas and budgets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 254 or Department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 257 Advertising Principles

This course uses practical concepts to examine the role of advertising in the marketing process. Topics covered include: ethical issues involved in advertising, various types of advertising used by marketers, services performed by ad agencies, the creative side of advertising including basic elements of copywriting and design, how to prepare an ad budget, and the elements of media selection. Also covered are the various types of advertising media including magazines, newspapers, outdoor, transit, yellow pages, and direct mail as well as the features of advertising on television, radio and the Internet. Prerequisite(s): BUS 131 or Department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 258 Production Management

Presents a survey which informs the student about the development of modern industry and scientific management and will enable him/her to grasp the operating principles. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 259 Public Relations

Principles and practices of building good public relations between industry and employees, stockholders, consumers, suppliers and the press. The development of public relations as a top-management function. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 266 Personnel Human Resource Management

This course develops an understanding of the important functions and tasks performed by the modern human resource department such as staffing, training, employee safety and compensation. Emphasis throughout will be on the partnership to ensure a motivated work force. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or Department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 267 Small Business Management

This course helps students develop an understanding of the relationship of small business management to the management process. It describes the fundamentals of small business management. A study is made of major problems and pitfalls faced by managers of small businesses. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 268 Industrial Purchasing

The principles and techniques of purchasing as they apply in actual practice today. The purchasing area will be treated as a specialized function in the business organization. Constructive aspects of purchasing with emphasis on long-term policies and profit-making opportunities. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 271 Intermediate Accounting I

An in-depth study of the principles related to financial accounting topics and a study of recent developments in financial accounting required by the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Topics include the following: development of accounting standards; nature of the conceptual framework, assumptions and principles; review of the accounting process; continued study of the Income Statement, Balance Sheet and Statement of Cash Flows; time value of money; cash and receivables, inventories; acquisition and disposal of property, plant and equipment; depreciation and depletion; intangible assets; long-term investment in Equity Securities and other assets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 and 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 272 Intermediate Accounting II

A continuation of the study of the principles related to financial accounting. This study will include a presentation of the following topics: stockholders' equity; dilutive securities; revenue recognition; accounting for income taxes; accounting for pensions and for leases; accounting changes and error analysis, full disclosure in financial reporting; financial reporting and changing prices; liabilities-current and contingent; liabilities-long term. Prerequisite(s): BUS 271 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 273 Cost Accounting

Principles of cost accounting applied to manufacturing industries. The use of cost data and procedures under job order, process cost, and standard cost accounting systems as a tool of management. Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 and 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 278 Business Project

This is an independent study course designed to offer a student experience in research and performing special projects in business and/or related area of interest. A faculty member shall act as a Project Advisor. The project selected will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous business administration and related courses. The number of credits received will be determined by the complexity of the project and agreed upon prior to the student's starting the course. Credits: 1 or 3 (1 or 3,0)

BUS 280 International Business

This course will cover the rapid growth of international business and proliferation of multinational firms. Topics include the nature of international business and the historical development of global markets and marketing. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 291 Investments

To familiarize students with financial literature and facilities that are available as guides to the proper selection of securities and other types of investments. The course is covered from the perspective of the individual investor. As such, a logical portfolio commensurate with the financial goals of the individual is stressed. Financial information available both in published as well as Internet access format are covered. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 300 Operations Management

This course undertakes an examination of the role of operations within manufacturing and service organizations. Emphasis is placed upon recognizing operational opportunities and tradeoffs, and employing quantitative and qualitative tools and decision support systems to assist strategic and operational decision-making. The general functions of operations management as applied to the transformation process are covered. Some of the important topics include but not limited to Forecasting, Statistical Quality Control, Inventory Management, Linear Programming, and Transportation Models. Note: Students who have previously completed IND 301 cannot receive credit for BUS 300. Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 303 Planning and Controlling Operation

This course is an introduction to the concepts and techniques of sales and operations planning; managing inventory; master scheduling; material requirements planning; production activity control; supply chain information systems; process mapping; JIT/Lean production; and Kanban systems. Case studies covering these topics will be included. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BUS 303 and IND 303. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 304 Business Law II

An introduction to the law of sales and lease contracts, letters of credit, commercial paper and secured transactions under the UCC and creditor's rights and remedies, including surety ship and guaranty, insurance, wills, trusts, elder law and consumer protection. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 or Department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 305 Entrepreneurship

This course covers the process of creating and growing a new business venture through the introduction and development of a business idea. Also covered are the nature and importance of entrepreneurs, international entrepreneurship opportunities, and the development of business and marketing plans. Methods for financing the new venture through the use of case studies and practical applications will be discussed and covered in assignments. Prerequisite(s): Managerial course or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 306 Project and Contract Management

This course covers the processes encountered in choosing, planning, controlling, and negotiating of projects and contracts in technologically based firms. Topics include project and contract; feasibility; risk analysis; selection; portfolio optimization; cost estimation and controls; capital budgeting; performance relating to negotiation, adjustments, and benchmark standards; and awareness and appreciation for ethical practices. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 306. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 310 Principles of Taxation

This course covers fundamental principles of income taxation under the Internal Revenue Code, related Regulations and court cases. Tax treatment of the individual is stressed, with emphasis on filing status, income and business deductions, and realization and recognition of capital gains and losses. Corporate and partnership taxation are introduced. Students are taught to recognize tax issues and gain the skills necessary to solve those issues. Prerequisite(s): BUS 102 or permission of department chair Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 311 Organizational Behavior

This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communication and dynamics; decision making; causes and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power, and politics in organizations. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for PSY 311. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109, or PSY 101 or PSY 130 or PSY 131 or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 312 Purchasing and Supply Chain Management

This course covers the purchasing and movement of materials into, through, and out of a firm; fundamentals of domestic and international transportation systems; distribution center, warehouse, and plant location; and management of multinational organizations and supply networks. Note: Students who previously took IND 311 cannot receive credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 316 Customer Relations and Quality

This course covers the basics of customer relations and quality in industry. The course includes discussion of quality management principles and standards as well as feedback techniques to measure and assure customer satisfaction. The American Customer Satisfaction Index, J.D. Power and Associates Reports, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Automotive Quality System QS-9000 registration criteria will also be discussed. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit IND 316. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 or IND 301 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 317 Enterprise Resource Planning

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is an organizational and information systems approach that integrates planning, customer relationship management, decision making, master scheduling, material requirements planning, marketing, finance, electronic commerce, and human resources. The course will include lectures and extensive use of supporting ERP software. Note: Students who have previously completed BUS/IND 313 cannot receive credit for BUS 317. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BCS 317. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 320 International Marketing

As the interconnectedness of the global economy grows, marketing managers are faced with an imperative to understand and face the challenges posed by the international marketplace, including the challenge of selling goods and services in markets abroad. This course focuses on marketing management within international settings and will cover topics and issues such as international market selection, adaptation of products, international promotion and pricing strategies, and differences in distribution channels, all within the context of national differences in culture, consumer behavior, levels of development, and political, legal, and economic systems. Prerequisite(s): BUS 131 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 321 International Law

This course provides study in the basic concepts and processes of the international legal system. The interaction of state, federal, and international law as well as the relationship of international law and the American legal system are explained. Particular attention is given to current problems faced by managers and to the dominant political, social economic, and technological forces influencing the evolution of international law. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 322 International Management

This course will examine the critical issues and practices of international management. Emphasis will be placed on the multicultural workforce and worldwide developments. Topics will include planning, political risk, organizing, decision-making, and controlling as pertaining to international management and operations. Students will study human resource/personnel issues concerning selection and repatriation, communication skills, and labor relations in a global context. Ethics and social responsibility as well as future trends of international management will be explored. The course will include student assignments and case studies examining the issues affecting small businesses expanding operations into foreign markets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109, BUS 280 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 327 Risk Management and Insurance

This course is designed to assist the student in the identification and analysis of the major types of financial risk management and insurance. The course will analyze the needs and problems faced by individuals and corporations regarding risk management exposure and how these exposures to risk are addressed through various forms of insurance. Case studies involving risk management, insurance, and relevant ethical factors will be covered. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 or department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 330 Cost Management Systems

This upper-level course pertains to the key elements of cost management systems of manufacturing and service organizations. Topics covered include: using cost drivers and activity based costing; eliminating non-value added activities; costing product (service) life cycles; and justifying capital expenditures for computer integrated manufacturing systems. Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of accounting. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 340 Advanced Business Statistics

This course covers advanced statistical concepts and techniques as applied to decision making and business applications. Topics include: estimating population values, hypothesis testing for one and two populations, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis and model building, statistical process control, analyzing and forecasting time-series data, and decision-making analysis. Prerequisite(s): BUS 240, statistics course or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 352 Employment Law

This course reviews the field of law governing employment. Topics covered include the following: Employment relationship and procedure, selection, testing, privacy, termination, and arbitration; employment discrimination regarding the Civil Rights Act, Affirmative Action, racial discrimination, sex discrimination, family leave and pregnancy discrimination, sexual orientation, religious discrimination, national origin discrimination, age discrimination and disability discrimination. Also covered are employment regulations regarding unions and collective bargaining agreements, wage and hour regulations, occupational safety and health, workers' compensation, and employee benefits. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 360 Leadership Theories Practices

The following will be covered: definition and significance of leadership; global and cultural contexts of leadership; early theories and practices: the foundations of modern leadership; individual differences and traits and the ability to lead; leadership and "emotional intelligence;" leadership and "the moral compass;" power, influence, and leadership; new models of leadership; leadership of non-profits; and leading change. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 366 International Human Resource Management

The importance of managing cultural diversity is a critical component to deriving successful outcomes for the workplace endeavor as well as the criteria for individual advancement in one's career in the global arena. The rapidly expanding involvement of the United States in global business activities has created a critical need for international business talent in all areas of business, and in particular, successful management of cultural differences to advance the team and the entity. This course addresses the understanding of cultural differences in global business and the art of negotiation to gain a win/win. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 367 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

This experiential course is intended to help students understand the theory, processes, and practices of negotiation, and also the cross-cultural issues facing negotiation, so they can be more effective negotiators in a variety of situations. This course is highly participatory, and utilizes various types of one-on-one and group-based negotiation simulations. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 379 Business Internship

This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better Credits: 3-12 (1,0,6)

BUS 380 Business Internship

This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better Credits: 3-12 (1,0,15)

BUS 381 Business Internship

This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better. Credits: 3-12 (1,0,24)

BUS 382 Business Internship

This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better Credits: 3-12 (1,0,33)

BUS 390 Special Topics in Business Management

This course will provide students the opportunity to learn about contemporary issues in business. Topics covered may include one or more specific areas within business such as Marketing, Leadership, Ethics, and Finance. Methods of teaching and assessment may include the use of seminars, speaker series, simulations, field trips, experiential learning, and the implementation of business ideas and plans. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 391 Selected Topics in Bus Mngmt

This course will provide students the opportunity to learn about contemporary issues in business. Topics covered may include one or more specific areas within business such as Marketing, Leadership, Ethics, and Finance. Methods of teaching and assessment may include the use of seminars, speaker series, simulations, field trips, experiential learning, and the implementation of business ideas and plans. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 400 Quality Techniques

This course covers quality tools and techniques used in problem solving and decision making. Topics include: Pareto charts; cause and- effects diagrams; check sheets; histograms; scatter diagrams; quality function deployment; statistical process control; continuous improvement; Goldratt’s theory of constraints; benchmarking; just-in time manufacturing; and implementing total quality. A written assignment will be required that integrates quality topics with problem solving and decision making tools and techniques. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 400. Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 or MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 401 Quality Management

This course covers quality philosophies and concepts. Topics include: quality and global competitiveness; human resources and technology; total quality approach; strategic management; quality management and ethics; partnering for competitiveness; quality culture; customer satisfaction and retention; employee empowerment; leadership and change; team building and teamwork; communication and interpersonal relations; education and training; overcoming politics and negativity toward quality in the workplace; relationship of ISO 9000 and Total Quality Management. A written assignment will be required that integrates quality philosophies and concepts with management and human resources issues. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 401. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 or IND 301 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 404 Financial Markets and Institutions

This senior level course describes the various financial markets and the financial institutions that serve those markets. Specific topics include financial intermediaries, primary and secondary financial markets, treasury and agency securities markets, municipal securities markets, financial futures markets, and stock markets in the U.S. and worldwide. Also included are evolving technologies, especially e-Business and the Internet, and their effect on financial markets and institutions. The course contains oral and written case study analyses utilizing electronic database research techniques. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 or department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 406 Business Organization Law

An introduction to the law of agency, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, securities, regulations, bankruptcy, employment and anti-trust laws. Prerequisite(s): BUS 202 or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 409 Strategic Management

This course covers key strategic management topics including internal and external scanning for SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, competitive advantage, cost versus differentiation, horizontal and vertical integration, strategic alliances, strategy implementation, as well as many other important topics. Special attention will be paid to international contexts, issues of ethics and governance, and measurements of strategic success. Students will be required to present oral and/or written case studies and analyses. Students who have previously completed IND 409 cannot receive credit for BUS 409. Note: Students cannot get credit for BUS 409 and 409W; BUS 409W can be used to fullfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300, Senior Level Standing Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 410 Senior Project

This is an independent study course. Students must obtain permission from a Project Advisor before registering for this course. Although there is some flexibility, most senior projects will involve student participation onsite in a company. The topic for the senior project will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous Management Technology and related courses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 410 Prerequisite(s): BUS 409 or IND 409 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 411 Financial Statement Analysis

This course covers the main reasons for and techniques used in financial statement analysis. This analysis uses the historical record of companies, as presented in financial statements, to answer questions regarding a firm’s credit worthiness and risk; current and projected financial performance; strengths and weaknesses in financial position; and strategy development for future operations. The course includes analysis tools and techniques such as common size financial statements, trend statements, and financial ratios. Also covered will be sources of financial information embodied in corporate annual reports such as the auditor’s report; footnotes and supplemental schedules; and SEC Forms 10-K and 10-Q. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 or department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 412 Business, Government and Society

This course covers the interrelationships among business, government, and society. Included also are the ethical, economic, political, and social issues managers face regarding consumers, employees, suppliers, the environment, government laws and regulations, and stockholders. These interrelationships and issues are discussed and analyzed in a managerial context employing stakeholder, historical, and global perspectives. Individual and group case study presentations both in oral and written formats are a major focus of the course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 413 Advanced Enterprise Resource Planning

This advanced-level Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) course includes high-level information technology coverage of Scheduling, Planning, MRP, Logistics, Warehousing, Procurement, Quality, Vendor Management, Cost Accounting, Forecasting, KPI, Supply Chain, and Customer Resource Management. Also covered are concepts and software applications, pertaining to product design, development, manufacturing (production), marketing, sales, and field service. This course emphasizes proficiency in all the skill sets typically required within industry practices. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 or BCS 300 and BUS 317 or BCS 317 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 421 Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance

This advanced corporate financial management course covers topics taken from the Institute of Management Accountants Certified in Financial Management program Part 2CFM examination. Topics covered include working capital policy and management; strategic issues in finance; portfolio and risk management; external financial environment; and employee benefit and pension plans. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 or department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 431 Managerial and Internal Controls Within The Business Enterprise

This senior level course has a strategic orientation and is intended for future managers with responsibilities in the areas of finance, operations, management, information technology, and financial and managerial accounting. The course objectives focus on the appropriate use of internal controls in effectively managing and controlling processes across the business enterprise. In addition, the importance of both the internal and external audit functions are reviewed in conjunction with management's fiduciary responsibilities to the stakeholders of the enterprise. Specific topics include the overall control environment, corporate culture, business ethics and management's responsibilities for implementing, monitoring and reporting on the adequacy of internal operating controls. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 or department approval Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 450 American Business History

The course focuses on major problems in American business history covering the period from the early colonial period (mid-1700's) through the present time. Biographical profiles of American leaders in industry and finance are included. The course makes extensive use of online database resources. Current topics such as industrial pollution, "oil shocks", deregulation, e-Commerce, terrorism, and globalization are covered. Students will participate in oral group presentations. Note: This is a BUS-designated course and as such does not satisfy the General Education American History requirement. Note: Students cannot get credit for BUS 450 and 450W; BUS 450W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Business Management Department. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 460 Leadership and Ethics

This advanced-level business management course covers theories, case studies, and skill development applications relating to effective leadership and ethics. Emphasis will be on the interrelated role of laws, cultural norms, attitudes, moral development, situational circumstances, and technologies as determining effects on ethical leadership. Coursework includes leadership-and ethics related research literature and databases. Note: Students cannot get credit for BUS 460 and 460W; BUS 460W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Business Management Department. Prerequisite(s) BUS 109 or Management course, EGL 101, Senior-level standing. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 470 Advanced Accounting

This course covers accounting for partnerships: formation, operation, dissolutions, and liquidation. Also covered are analysis of business combinations; statutory mergers, consolidations, acquisition of subsidiaries, preparation of consolidated financial statements including the equity method and elimination entries. Additionally, the course includes an introduction to foreign currency translation and transactions, the SEC, and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Prerequisite(s): BUS 272 or Department approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 471 Auditing

This course covers professional ethics and possible legal liability of the auditor. Emphasized are Generally Accepted Standards (GAAS) and other standards related to attestation engagements and skills needed to apply that knowledge in and other attestation engagements; the role of internal control; uses of sampling; effects of information technology the reports rendered by auditors; and the methods for preparing communications to satisfy engagement objectives. Prerequisite(s) BUS 272 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 473 Global Finance

Introduces students to financial management in the context of international and global market and firm activities. Topics presented include international financial markets, foreign exchange markets, exchange rates, portfolio management from a global perspective, risk management, international banking, and multinational financial management. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201, 280 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 479 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internships, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA 3.0. Credits: 3-12 (1,0,6)

BUS 480 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA 3.0. Credits: 3-12 (1,0,15)

BUS 481 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA 3.0. Credits: 3-12 (1,0,24)

BUS 482 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA 3.0. Credits: 3-12 (1,0,33)

BUS 483 Business Internship II

This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s): BUS 379, or BUS 380 or BUS 381 or BUS 382, Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA 3.0. Credits: 3-15 (1,0,42)

BUS 494 Seminar in Global and International Business

This capstone course for global business management majors will cover a wide range of current issues in strategy and policy and integrates concepts from across the core global business courses. Students will be required to synthesize and apply these methods and concepts to case studies and case write-ups. The course will culminate with students developing and completing a research project and presentation based upon their personal interest in global/international business. Prerequisite(s): BUS 280, 320, 322, and 409 Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 502 Project Management

This course covers the core knowledge of the project management professions. It includes the creation of the project charter and scope statement, establishment of the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), and communication of the overall plan including risk planning, resource planning, creation of the project schedule and budget, development of the project team, and measurement and control of project implementation. Course content is aligned with Project Management Professional Certification requirements, such that the course serves as a preparation for the PMP examination (PMP examination is not part of the course). Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 504 Technology Management Ethics and Policies

This course defines ethics in the context of engineering technology management and its application in the context of the profession and licensure. It also covers the role of ethics during the bidding stage. This course addresses ethics for union and management, the role of ethics in the event of a change order, and ethics in private versus public ventures. Other topics covered are ethics in domestic versus international markets, the application of ethics in a twenty-first century global market, individual responsibilities and values, cultural background and its effect on ethics, peer review and peer attitudes toward s ethics, and leadership, power and the politics of ethics. This course uses real-life case studies as recorded by the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE). Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 532 Legal Aspects of Construction Management

This course covers the complexity of legal environments in construction. It includes principles of contract, standard forms of contract, contractual relationships, bidding documents, dispute resolution, red-flag clauses, labor agreements, insurance and surety bonds, change order management, differing site conditions, delays, suspensions and terminations, liquidated damages, allocating responsibility for delays, constructive acceleration, and associated documentation. Prerequisite(s): BUS 504 with a grade of C or higher, and Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 630 Decision Making and Risk Management

This course covers concepts and methods for making complex decisions in Technology Management. Students will identify criteria and alternatives, set priorities, and engage in allocating resources, strategic planning, resolving conflict, and making decisions. Students will select the most effective decision making approaches to evaluate multiple alternatives in scenarios with conflicting objectives and different levels of uncertainty. Students will also learn how to generate risk management plans, appraise mitigating risk options and revise decision making failures Prerequisite(s): Graduate status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 670 Master's Project

This is a Capstone course for students who do not plan to take the thesis option. The course is designed as an independent study in which the student utilizes their knowledge in the field to evaluate a series of case studies. A complete oral and written presentation is required of each student detailing his/her work. In each case study the student must clearly demonstrate their ability to understand, analyze and solve technical and/or managerial problems by applying their knowledge gained through their course work. Students completing this course will not receive credit for ETM 670. Prerequisite(s): Completion of twenty-one (21) credits of required Core and Track Specific Courses in the ETM program and permission of graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

BUS 671 Master's Thesis

This is an independent study performed by the students to utilize their knowledge in engineering technology management. This practice-oriented work contributes to the enhancement of productivity, the improvement of quality, and the achievement of an industry’s cost effectiveness. The master’s thesis draws on students’ individual interests, stimulating their critical thinking, and sharpening their problem-solving abilities. A literature survey, analysis, discussion, and conclusions are documented in the thesis under the direction of a faculty mentor and presented by the student at the completion of the work to demonstrate his/her professional competency in their field of study. Students completing this course will not receive credit for ETM 671. Prerequisite(s): Completion of twenty-one (21) credits of required Core and Track Specific Courses in the ETM program and permission of graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (6,0)

CHINESE

CHI 151 Chinese I

A beginning course in Chinese emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CHI 152 Chinese II

A continuation of Chinese 151. This course emphasizes the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s): CHI 151 or 2-3 years of high school Chinese. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CHEMISTRY

With the exception of CHM 111 and CHM 112, both theory and laboratory components must be completed simultaneously in order to receive credit for any chemistry course.

CHM 111 Chemistry and the Public Interest

An abridged course in General Chemistry which presents the ideas and methods of chemical science in a qualitative and conceptual fashion. This course assumes no previous science background and will emphasize the fundamentals of measurement, atomic theory, bonding, solutions, acids and bases, salts, equations, chemical arithmetic and energy transfer. Illustrations and applications of concepts will be drawn from everyday life. (This course is intended to fulfill the science requirements of non-science majors and is NOT OPEN to science, health science, or pre-health majors). Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CHM 112L Chemistry and Public Interest Lab

A one semester laboratory course for non-science majors designed to provide students with experience in the methods of chemistry. Students will investigate the properties of substances, perform chemical analysis and substance identification, synthesize a drug and a natural product, and test manufacturers' claims for consumer products. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 1 (0,2)

CHM 124 Principles of Chemistry

A one semester survey of general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on quantitative applications of chemical concepts. Topics include: measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical stoichiometry, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium and kinetics. This course will fulfill the requirement of certain science, health science, or pre-health programs that have an introductory chemistry course as a prerequisite. Note: the laboratory course CHM 124L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 4 (3,3)

CHM 140 Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry

A one semester course with laboratory designed primarily for Dental Hygiene students. Basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry are presented with emphasis on their applications to health science. Topics include measurement, states of matter, bonding theory, solutions, acids, buffers and pH, and the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, sterols, amino acids and proteins and a molecular approach to enzymatic action, digestion, metabolism and nutrition. Note: the laboratory course CHM 140L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 and High School chemistry with Laboratory or CHM 124. Credits: 4 (3,2)

CHM 152 General Chemistry Principles I

The first part of a two semester sequence in General Chemistry Principles with laboratory. This course covers the qualitative and quantitative aspects of scientific measurement, the nature of matter, gases, liquids and solids, energy, atomic theory, properties of elements, chemical bonding, molecular structure and properties, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and solutions. Note: the laboratory course CHM 152L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): (MP3, RMAT, RMTB, or MTH 116) and (Regents Chemistry or an equivalent High School Chemistry with Laboratory or CHM 124) Credits: 4 (3,3)

CHM 153 General Chemistry Principles II

A continuation of General Chemistry Principles I, which includes laboratory. Topics include: solutions and their colligative properties, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, pH, buffers, titration curves, oxidation and reduction balancing, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, the covalent bond and the shape of molecules. Note: the laboratory course CHM 153L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): CHM 152 Credit: 4 (3,3)

CHM 260 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

A one semester course in organic chemistry designed to provide background in the fundamentals of nomenclature, mechanisms, structures, and synthesis of carbon based compounds. This course is designed for science and health science majors who desire a general rather than a detailed knowledge of the compounds of carbon. Topics to be covered include: structure and bonding, acid/base chemistry, isomerism, stereochemistry, and structure determination. Functional groups to be covered include: hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives and amines. Laboratory work will include common organic techniques and experiments supporting the principles covered in lecture. Note: the laboratory course CHM 260L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): CHM 153 Credits: 4 (3,3)

CHM 270 Organic Chemistry I

A study of the compounds of carbon involving a thorough integration of observation and theory and emphasizing the relationships between structures, properties, mechanisms and reactions. This course, intended for science and pre-professional majors, covers topics such as bonding and structure, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloaliphatic hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, dienes, benzene, electrophilic aromatic substitution, arenes, spectroscopy and structure determination. Note: the laboratory course CHM 270L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): CHM 153 Credits: 5 (3,4)

CHM 271 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHM 270. Topics covered include: alkyl and aryl halides, alcohols and phenols, ethers and epoxides, carboxylic acids, esters, anhydrides, aldehydes, ketones, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates, heterocycles and polymers. Note: the laboratory course CHM 271L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): CHM 270 Credits: 5 (3,4)

CHM 380 Biochemistry

A one semester course covering the fundamentals of biochemistry. Topics covered include: the structure and function of important biomolecules such as carbohydrates lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics and the use of cofactors and coenzymes; and metabolic pathways including glycolysis, TCA, electron transport system, fatty acid and amino acid pathways. Laboratory work includes current biochemical laboratory techniques such as chromatography and electrophoresis, application of specific topics described above, and analysis of data from laboratory experiments. Note: the laboratory course CHM 380L is a part of your grade for this course. Attendance in the laboratory course is required. Approved eye-protection and a laboratory coat are required materials. A student must pass the laboratory course to receive a passing grade in the entire course. Prerequisite(s): CHM 260 or CHM 271 Credits: 4 (3,3)

CHM 381 Advanced Biochemistry

A continuation of the concepts covered in Biochemistry. Students will examine the pathways, enzymes, and organic chemical mechanisms involved in the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids, and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis will be placed on the unique coenzymes that are required for these metabolisms. Students will also be trained in reading and interpreting research publications in biochemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHM 271 and CHM 380 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CHM 480 Chemistry Research I

Chemistry Research I represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Students will work alongside chemistry faculty in their professional research. Registration requires submission of resume three months in advance, chemistry faculty invitation or recommendation, and department chair approval. Prerequisite(s): CHM 270 and Permission of Department Chair. Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

CHM 481 Chemistry Research II

Chemistry Research II represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Students will work alongside chemistry faculty in their professional research. Registration requires submission of resume three months in advance, chemistry faculty invitation or recommendation, and department chair approval. Prerequisite(s): CHM 480 with a grade of B or higher and Permission of Department Chair. Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

CON 101 Introduction to Technology and Applied Programming

A survey of technological concepts, terminology and a brief review of mathematical concepts. This course introduces concepts of vector and its applications. It introduces hands-on programming and its applications, and reviews problem-solving techniques with technological applications. Credits: 2 (1,2)

CON 103 Surveying

The development of skills in the use of the basic surveying instruments- tape, level, transit. Trigonometric and differential leveling and cross-sectioning. Azimuth, bearing and angle determination by repetition procedures. Angular closures. Stadia and stadia reduction of inclined sights, topographic mapping by transit stadia and plan table methods. This course will include a field laboratory assignment. Credits: 3 (2,3)

CON 106 Statics

This is a basic course in Statics. The main objective of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of statics. Topics such as resultant of a force, equilibrium of forces, moments, couples, analysis of simple trusses, centroids, center of gravity, moments of inertia and friction are covered in this course. Prerequisite(s): MTH 129 Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 111 Graphics I

To develop student's abilities in lettering, technical sketching, drafting and the use of drafting instruments. The fundamentals of orthographic projection and pictorial drawings develop the student's abilities to visualize and describe objects and structures graphically. Credits: 2 (1,2)

CON 121 Graphics II

To continue the development of the graphic skills from Graphics I to include one and two point perspective drawing and the introduction of descriptive geometry. Also included is an extensive use of computer-aided drawing on AutoCad. Prerequisite(s): CON 111 Credits: 2 (1,2)

CON 161 Materials and Methods of Construction I

An introduction to the engineering properties and the uses of construction materials including soils, concrete, masonry, steel and wood. Classroom testing demonstrations of several materials are included. Conventional construction systems are studied. The student is also given an orientation to the construction industry, the associated professions, and the varieties of employment available. Note: Students cannot get credit for CON 161 and 161W; CON 161W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement which is offered at the discretion of the Architectural/Construction Management Department Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 162 Materials and Methods of Construction II

A continuation of CON 161 extended to include the study of architectural properties of selected materials, methods of construction, and building components. Class work includes technical problem solving using quantitative and graphic analysis of specific building construction systems. Prerequisite(s): CON 161 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 207 Elements of Strength of Materials

Introduces to the concepts of stress, strain, bending and shear stresses, including elasticity, shear and moment diagrams for beams, moment of inertia of unsymmetrical sections, thermal and combined stresses. Laboratory demonstration of experiments and testing equipment are included. Prerequisite(s): CON 106 or MET 201 Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 251 Architectural Design I

Drafting standards, techniques and creative design principles related to the field of architecture. Freehand drawing design problems with the development of research notes, preliminary studies and architectural presentation drawings. Credits: 3 (2,3)

CON 299 Construction/Architecture Internship

A program of practical experience and independent study to supplement and enrich classroom learning. It is a fully faculty supervised structured industrial experience. Periodical written reports and end of the assignment employer report required. Prerequisite(s): 3rd Semester Standing, and Department Chair approval Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

CON 302 Soils, Foundations and Earth Structure

This course introduces soil mechanics, foundation and earth structure to the engineering technology students. It includes soil classification, soil properties, soil stresses, earth pressures, bearing capacity, slope stability. It also discusses principles of foundation analysis and design, retaining walls, etc. Laboratory experiments to test behavior of soils included. Prerequisite(s): CON 207 Corequisite(s): CON 302L Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 303 Hydraulics

This course provides a broad understanding of the basic principles of engineering hydraulics and hydrology. The emphasis is on application of the theories. It involves basic principle of hydraulics, flow in closed conduits, flow in open channels, hydraulic structures, principles of hydrology, groundwater hydraulics, and related laboratory experiments. Computer application included. Prerequisite(s): CON 207 and PHY 136 Corequisite(s): CON 303L Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 350 Introduction to Construction Engineering

This course introduces construction engineering principles and methods and equipment used in heavy and commercial construction. It includes earthmoving excavating, loading and hauling, rock excavation, compressed air and water systems, tunneling, and some selected topics from building construction. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 and CON 207 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 357 Quantity Surveying and Costing

This course focuses on fundamentals of quantity survey and costing of residential and commercial facilities. Quantification of materials from construction drawings is covered in this course. Topics also covered range from site work, forms, concrete, metals and masonry, plumbing and electrical to wood framing and steel framing. The course also introduces fundamentals of computer assisted estimating. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 361 Government Building, Environmental Codes and Regulations

This course studies the concepts in preparation of an environmental impact statement. It also reviews state and local building and land use controls. Attention will be given to governmental regulations required to obtain building permits for particular construction projects. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 365 Highway Design and Construction

Design criteria for roadways including arterial signalization speed considerations, visual constraints and reaction criteria. Superelevation and spiral curve criteria. Construction quantification, haul considerations and mass curve analysis. Traffic considerations, destination surveys and road saturation criteria. Intersection analysis, striping, signage and lighting. Barriers, types and design considerations. Economic analysis and environmental constraints. Appurtenant structure consideration such as drains, curbing, curb cuts and ramps. Pavement stability. Prerequisite(s): CON 303 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 399 Applied Research Topics

A program of applied research and independent study on topics a faculty member is currently working on. This course is meant to enrich the learning experience by introducing the student to methods and analysis in applied research. This is a fully faculty directed and supervised structured research experience. Applied research work will be presented in an appropriate forum. Prerequisite(s): Associate degree in Construction Technology or third year standing in a Construction Technology program. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

CON 401W Construction Project Management and Scheduling (Writing Intensive)

This course gives an in-depth introduction and orientation to construction project management. This includes professional construction management in practice and methods in professional construction management. Some of the areas this course will cover are: Bidding and Award, Application of Controls, Scheduling, Planning and Control of Operations and Resources, Procurement Quality Assurance, Safety and Health in Construction, Industrial Relations. Computer Applications included. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for CON 401 and 401W; CON 401W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Construction/Architectural Management Department Prerequisite(s): CON 162 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 402 Civil Engineering Materials

This course covers a study of the materials used for Civil Engineering construction purposes. The materials to be studied are concrete, steel, asphalt and wood. The physical parameters which contribute to material performance are studied. Appropriate laboratory tests are included. Documents from the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Testing material will be used. Prerequisite(s): CON 162 Corequisite(s): 402L Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 405 Advanced Estimating

This course attempts to give the students a broader perspective based on the various roles an estimator may play that requires preparation or interpretation of cost data. It provides an understanding of the importance of accurate estimating in controlling project cost and in determining project budgets. It includes references and examples that cover the wide range of project types. It also covers present computer technology in the field of estimating. Prerequisite(s): CON 357 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 406 Advanced Project Planning and Scheduling

CON 406 Advanced Project Planning and Scheduling. Topics include introduction to advanced project planning concepts and terminology, development of schedule activities and preparing and maintaining computerized schedules. Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM). Prerequisite(s): CON 401W Credits: 3 (3,0)

CON 407 Building Commissioning

This course provides various aspects of Building Commissioning process that includes verifying all the subsystems of a building such as HVAC, plumbing, electrical, fire/life safety, building envelopes, lighting etc. Students will develop an understanding of the relationships between new construction and LEED Building Commissioning credits. Laboratory tests on start up and optimization of energy uses of HVAC, Electrical and Plumbing components are included. Prerequisite(s): ARC 263 Credits: 3 (2,2)

CON 408 Structures

This course introduces fundamentals of structural analysis for beams, trusses, frames, etc. It includes statically determinate as well as indeterminate structures. This course also introduces fundamentals of reinforced concrete design including strength design for beams, columns, footings, and two way slabs. Computer application included. Prerequisite(s): CON 207 Credits: 3 (2,0,2)

CON 409 Structural Design

This course introduces fundamentals of structural steel design. This includes design of tension members, compression members, beams, columns, and various connections. This course also teaches the basic principles of wood design, which includes formwork design and frame construction. Computer application is included. Prerequisite(s): CON 207 Credits: 3 (2,0,2)

CON 496 Capstone Project

This is a capstone course. It utilizes skills and knowledge acquired in various courses in the curriculum and general education courses to produce a real life project. In this course, students follow a faculty driven structured process to integrate various components of a project. This course introduces very little new material, rather it helps the student to synthesize skills and knowledge learned in other courses to apply in real-life situations. Prerequisite(s): Department Approval, Upper Division Status and substantial completion of the program. Credits: 3 (2,0,3)

CON 497 Senior Project I

Part I of a two part capstone course. Involves writing the proposal and researching background for Part II of Senior Project CON 498. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. Credits: 1 (0,3)

CON 498 Senior Project II

Part II of two part capstone course. Involves investigation of proposed problem, including test, analysis, design, etc. along with formal report and presentation to senior project faculty committee. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. Credits: 2 (0,6)

CON 499 Senior Project

This is a capstone course. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. Credits: 3 (0,9)

COMPUTER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY

CPS 201 Digital Systems & Security

The course will examine the security threats to digital information, computer systems and networks. Students will learn about the principles of digital systems, including computer architecture and programming, digital information, and techniques to maintain the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information. Topics will include risk assessment, security awareness, security policy, security auditing, and legal and ethical aspects. The course will prepare the students with background knowledge in cryptography, biometrics, software security and network security. Prerequisite(s): EET 105 (3,0)

CPS 203 Data Security & Privacy

In this course, students will learn about the security issues with data that relates to personal and organizational privacy. The students will develop the skill to identify and address critical security and privacy issues involved in the design, development and deployment of information systems. Students will be able to design and maintain the security of database containing the confidential information such as Electronic Medical Records and Biometric Data. Topics will also include legal and policy perspectives of privacy in the digital age. Prerequisite(s): CPS 201 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 205 Digital Signal & Image Proecessing

This course will examine the fundamental concepts of digital signals and image in relation to security applications. Topics will include signal and image characteristics, acquisition, quantization, filtering, enhancement, spectral analyses, feature extraction, segmentation, and morphological transformation. Students will be trained on algorithm and mathematical tools, and practical applications of Digital Signal and Image Processing techniques. The course will also examine the digital video and its applications to security field. Prerequisite(s): CPS 201 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 301 Biometric Recognition

This course will examine the concepts of automated human recognition with anatomical biometrics and behavioral biometrics. It focuses on biometric system design, biometric image and signal processing, biometric sensor technology, and anti-spoofing technology. Students will learn how each biometric works, how to process non-ideal biometric signals and images, and how to choose the right biometrics for different applications. The course also covers the security and privacy issue of biometrics. Prerequisite(s): CPS 205 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 303 Operating System & Security

This course presents the state of the art of OS security to students. It covers OS-level mechanisms, and how they relate to mitigating and defending against malware attacks on computer systems, such as buffer overflow, remote access Trojan, self-propagating worms, large-scale botnets, etc. Basic OS security techniques such as logging, system call auditing, address space randomization, memory protection, virtual machine introspection (VMI) will be discussed. Other techniques, such as host-based intrusion and detection, system randomization, vulnerability fingerprinting, and virtualization, will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): CPS 201 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 305 Foundations of Cryptography

This course examines the mathematical principles underlying encryption and cryptanalysis. It covers cryptology-related concepts in Number Theory, Group Theory, Linear Algebra, and Probability Theory. It introduces algebraic structures such as groups and fields, and covers fundamental algorithms for integer arithmetic such as primality testing and integer factorization. Upon successful completion, students will have a solid foundation to learn a variety of cryptographic algorithms. Prerequisite(s): (MTH 130 or MTH 150) and CPS 201 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 401 Applied Cryptography

This course examines the inner workings of modern symmetric and public-key cryptosystems and algorithms, including DES, AES, MD5, SHA-1/2/3, RSA, multi-party computation, and elliptic curve cryptography (ECC), and the constructions of Message Authentication Code (MAC) and Digital Signature (DS). It examines the privacy applications of cryptography supporting anonymous credentials and private database lookup. Lattice-based cryptography will also be examined. Prerequisite(s): CPS 305 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 405 Senior Project

This capstone course will require students to employ the technical knowledge they gathered throughout the curriculum in order to carry out an independent research project on a topic related to computer security technology. Under supervision of a Faculty member, students will produce creative projects, generate research papers, and present their work. Prerequisite(s): CPS 401 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 460 Network Security

This course will examine the security threats to computer networks and techniques to secure network. Topics will include network components and protocols, access control, firewall, honeypot, intrusion detection, virtual private network, vulnerability assessment, malware propagation, denial of service attacks, investigation of network data, and security protocols. At the conclusion of the course, students will have a full understanding of security design, network monitoring, and response to network attacks. Prerequisite(s): CPS 303 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 461 Penetration Testing

This course will cover a broad base of topics in ethical hacking, network defense, and offensive security. It aims to immerse students into an interactive environment where they will learn how to scan, test, and secure information systems. Students will gain in-depth knowledge and practical experience with network systems. By gaining a thorough understanding of how hackers operate, a student will be able to set up strong countermeasures and defensive systems to protect an organization's critical infrastructure and data. The students will discuss the various legal issues associated with the pen-testing and ethical hacking. Prerequisite(s): CPS 460 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 462 Smart Grid Security

The course examines the fundamentals of smart power grid and the necessary background in computer security. It covers both cyber security and physical security across operational aspects of smart grid and discusses a variety of secure solutions to the smart grid, including identity management and access control, threat defense, datacenter security, WAN security, security monitoring and management, physical safety and security, generation plant security, substation security, and utility regulatory compliance. Prerequisite(s): CPS 460 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CPS 463 Distributed Systems & Security

This course explores the design and implementation of secure distributed systems. The main goal focuses on the techniques for creating functional, usable, scalable, and high-performance distributed systems with security as a built-in factor. It covers the principles and techniques behind the design of distributed systems, such as locking, concurrency, scheduling, remote procedure call and transparency, distributed shared memory, update conflicts, and the security components, such as cryptographic primitives, user authentication, secure-socket layer, imperfect communication and other types of failure, software vulnerabilities and exploits, intrusion detection and prevention. Other topics may be covered including cluster-based IP Router, Onion routing, Distributed systems at Data Center, Cloud computing and Google File System. Prerequisite(s): CPS 303 and CPS 401 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Philosophical and historical background of policing throughout the free world; special emphasis is placed on the heritage of British and American policing, the governmental role of law enforcement in society; administration of American justice at all levels of government. The role of technology in law enforcement and crime prevention; history, modes and impact. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 101 Law Enforcement and Community Relations

Emphasis will be placed on the numerous and complex factors involved in the areas of human relations as they affect law enforcement. An examination of prejudices, myths, and discrimination, how to control them, and their impact in law enforcement. The use of information management tools for classifying cases with respect to issues of bias. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 102 Juvenile Delinquency

An introduction and an orientation to the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency; an examination of the methods of handling juvenile offenders, including interviewing techniques, screening, and referrals to social agencies. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 105 Corrections in America

This course will discuss the history of the US correctional systems as a series of penal reforms. It will also explore the theoretical principles and critiques that direct and influence correctional policies and practices, past and present. In addition, it will investigate the populations and operations of various correctional institutions and programs: inmates and offices, jails, prisons, and community forms of correction. It will further assess the problems and challenges of current correctional practices: aging populations, mental illness, and HIV/AIDS. Moreover, it will consider the future of corrections in the context of what has been called "a culture of control". Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 115 Computer Forensics

This course is an orientation to the study of computer forensic methods. The course will include an analysis of computer hardware that is utilized in forensic investigations such as motherboards, BIOS settings, hard and floppy disk drives and controllers, SCSI controllers and drives and implementations, RAID controllers, boot sequences and related components. Also, this course will introduce the student to methods used in analyzing data storage devices and will include an examination of the physical structures, surfaces and formats of hard disks and other media. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 200 Criminal Investigation

Introduction to criminal investigation, technical methods used at the crime scene; development of clues, identification of suspects; criminal investigation procedures including the theory of an investigation; conduct at crime scenes; collection and preservation of physical evidence, analysis of the elements that constitute all crimes. Note: The course may be offered as a writing intensive course at the discretion of the Criminal Justice Department. Students cannot get credit for both CRJ 200 and CRJ 200W. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 201 Criminalistics

The role of the Crime Laboratory in the law enforcement organization; scope of a criminalistic operation; organizational orientation of the criminalistics laboratory. Reconstruction of the crime scene through computer animation methods. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 203 Criminology

This course introduces anthropological, biological and economical, ecological, philosophical, psychological, psychiatric and sociological theories of criminal behavior as well as research evidence on the basic patterns of crime and crime trends. Computer-based data analysis of index crimes selected from the Uniform Crime Reports compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Crime Victimization Survey. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 204 Criminal Law

Elements and proof of frequent concern in law enforcement, with reference to principal rules of criminal liability. Importance of criminal law at the enforcement levels is considered from crime prevention to courtroom appearance. Particular emphasis will be placed on the New York State Penal Law. Case analysis method is employed to study case precedents. Computer software for rapid information retrieval will be introduced. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 205 Criminal Procedure Law

Rules of evidence of particular importance at the operational level in law enforcement with emphasis on criminal procedure in areas such as arrest, force, and search and seizure. Particular emphasis will be placed on the New York State Criminal Procedure Law. The use of case tracking tools within prosecution and court units and systems; the use of case outcome analytical techniques to determine trends in practice and effectiveness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 211 Law Enforcement Administration

Principles of organization and management in law enforcement and public safety. Analysis of the major problems in police organization and administration. Developing, maintaining and using complex and multiple information systems for crime trends as well as internal organizational operations; use of management control systems and associated computer information analysis and simulation tools for police patrol planning and evaluation. Examination of the role of technology in the police crime prevention function. Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 217 Computer Forensics II

Computer Forensics II is a continuation of CRJ 115. This course covers topics such as disk geometry and organization. Master boot sector record and volume record creation and organization, file signatures for data type identification, cyclic redundancy checksum for data integrity validation, and RSA's MD5 hash values for file authentication. Other subjects introduced include the UNIX "grep" search utility, search string techniques and file signature matching, and recovery of files that are intentionally deleted, hidden, or renamed. The course examines advanced computer-based evidentiary and "discovery" data methodologies, and includes a study of evidence identification, documentation, and chain of custody procedures. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 115 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 218 Computer Forensics III

This course examines federal, state, and local computer fraud statutes to provide the student with a legal foundation to approach computer investigations. The course includes lecture elements that provide the student with the skills necessary to conduct successful computer-related investigations, and includes an examination of the processes involved in preparing an affidavit for a search warrant. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 217 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 230 Biometrics and Identity Theft

This course will introduce the history of biometrics, physiological/anatomical biometrics (fingerprint, iris, face hand geometry, DNA, ear, vascular, etc), behavioral biometrics (speech/voice, signature, gait, keyboard typing, human biosignal, etc), biometric sensor technology and anti-spoofing, and soft biometrics. Students will learn how each biometric works, and how and why different biometrics should be chosen for different applications, such as online banking, surveillance and transportation security. It also covers the security and privacy issue of biometrics. The course will provide students with an understanding of the nature and scope of Identity Theft and Computer-Related Fraud. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 115 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 300 Forensic Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of forensic psychology, a discipline that applies psychology to the law and the criminal justice system. Topics to be covered include: the psychologist's role in the criminal courts, ethical dilemmas of psychologists working in the criminal justice system, psychological perspectives on the nature of criminality and the investigation of crime, criminal profiling, the effects of psychological empirical research on the outcome of criminal trials, and the psychology of the police, witnesses, offenders, and victims. Other new research topics in the field, such as the use of brain fingerprinting technology to determine criminal culpability will also be explored. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for PSY 300. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 100 or PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 307 Criminal Justice Data Base Operations

The course introduces students to the meaning and structure of criminal justice data, the design of and security for criminal, legal and classified databases, the management of competing information security and confidentiality concerns, and the rights to access criminal justice records on the part of the public, corporate interests and the media. The course examines criminal justice data collection throughout the legal lifecycle (complaint, arrest, prosecution, court, corrections, probation and parole); understanding all through the prism of authenticity, value, timeliness, accountability, integration and prevention. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 115 Corequisite(s): CRJ 307L Credits: 4 (3,2)

CRJ 308 Forensic Technology

The course will introduce the student to photographic and video equipment and methods that are used for crime scene documentation and police surveillance operations, including forensic imaging analysis. The course will include a study of camera design and operation, lens selection and functions, role of light and illumination technologies, digital image editing software, and a review of the chain of custody procedures in recording and archiving images for courtroom presentation. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 201 Corequisite(s): CRJ 308L Credits: 4 (3,2)

CRJ 310 Computer Security I

This course focuses on security threats to an organization's data network such as hackers, intruders, industrial espionage and sabotage, fraud and theft. The components of computer security architecture are studied as well as the principles of security networking protocols, encryption, fault tolerance techniques, and file system protection. Additional topics covered include the protection of computer hardware and software. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 115 Credits: 3 (3,0,1)

CRJ 311 Computer Security II

This course is a continuation of CRJ 310, and includes an analysis of the security features of computer operating systems. The course will review the OSI model and describe how systems communicate with one another. Also included in the course is a detailed study of authentication technologies and how they are used to secure an organization's assets and electronic transactions. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 310 Credits: 3 (3,0,1)

CRJ 312 Computer Security III

The course examines computer software threats which include the birth, life and termination of computer viruses, their modes of operation, detection techniques, virus signatures and virus removal methods as well as other "virus like" threats which are delivered by e-mail and internet/intranet packets. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 311 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 314 Security Law and Policy

This course introduces students to the study of security law and security policies. Topics include crimes and offenses encountered by security personnel, application of criminal, civil and administrative law in the security field, employment liability, workplace violence and legal issues in security services. The course will also discuss the security policy formulation process. Students will learn how to develop security policy by incorporating federal regulatory requirements and business demands. Other topics examined are the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act, the Communications Decency Act, and the Communications Privacy Act. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 100 Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 323 Network Defense

This course will discuss the security issues in computer networks and different security mechanisms to protect the secure internal networks and systems. It will involve a study of firewall technologies, including packet filtering, proxying, network address translation, and virtual private networks. An analysis of firewall architectures, such as screening routers, screened hosts, hosts, screened subnets, perimeter networks, and internal firewalls, will be included. It will also discuss the architecture, monitoring strategies, and analysis engines of an intrusion detection system. An analysis of information transformation processes for intrusion detection, such as misuse and anomaly detection, will be covered. Additional topics will include a study of technical issues in intrusion detection such as scalability, interoperability, sensor control, reliability, integration, and user interfaces. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 115 Credits: 3 (3,0,1)

CRJ 406 Crime Analysis and Mapping

Students will learn how to analysis and apply sampled data distributions to crime patterns. Digital tools will allow students to identify trends and patterns in order to determine police service allocations based on collected data The science and foundation principles of geographical information systems design and operation will be reviewed. Homeland Security implications as well as publicly available geospatial information will also be covered as specific applications for mapping techniques. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 307 Corequisite(s): CRJ 406L Credits: 4 (3,2)

CRJ 407 Crime Prevention Systems

This course will introduce the student to the theory and practice of crime prevention and examine topics such as the relationship of the built environment to crime, designing out crime, threat assessment, target hardening, and the like. The course will also focus on residential and commercial crime prevention systems. In addition, an analysis of false alarms from the perspective of the environment, end-user errors, and equipment malfunctions will be conducted. The course concludes with a review of police studies that have examined the nature and extent of the false alarm problem as well as the laws that regulate the use of crime prevention systems by public and private agencies. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 406 Corequisite(s): CRJ 407L Credits: 4 (3,2)

CRJ 410 Senior Project

Independent study of a Security Systems or related area of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as project Advisor. The project selected will utilize competencies acquired in previous Security Systems and related courses. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

CRJ 420 Physical Security I

A study of the theory and practice of managing the movement of people in organizational settings. This lecture course examines the operating principles and applications of access control readers, card encoding technologies, locking assemblies, and system functions such as fail-safe, fail-secure, access levels, time zones, limited and unlimited access privileges, and the like. Also, the course focuses on the role of alarm systems in an organization's overall protection plan, from the control of violence in the workplace to preventing theft of company property. Sensor technologies as well as controls and signaling systems are analyzed and evaluated with applications in the following areas: perimeter, interior, occupant, and object protection. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 323 Credits: 4 (4,0,1)

CRJ 421 Physical Security II

A continuation of CRJ 420. Advanced topics include a study of camera and lens types, monitors, video signaling systems, scanners, pan and tilt positioning devices, video motion detectors, camera housings and enclosures, switchers, multiplexers, time-lapse VCRs, digital video recorders, and their interactive role in the design of CCTV systems. Analysis of illumination technologies, including fluorescent, high and low pressure sodium, metal halide, ultraviolet and infrared light sources. Other topics include the application philosophy as well as the hardware and software components of video surveillance computers, and the analysis of video field and frame compositions with reference to identification issues in criminal cases. An inquiry into the legal and ethical dimensions of surveillance, including Fourth Amendment guidelines, Plain View Doctrine cases, the Expectation of Privacy court cases and directives, and the Exclusionary Rule. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 420 Credits: 3 (3,0,1)

CRJ 430 Forensic DNA Analysis

This course will introduce the student to modern molecular biological techniques that are used in a crime laboratory. The student will be taught the theory of forensic DNA testing as well as gain practical forensic field experience. The course will cover background information on body fluid identification, DNA structure and function, analytical of DNA typing. The primary focus will be the molecular biological technique known as short tandem repeats (STR) testing. Other topics covered include sample handling, DNA databanking, results reporting, criminal cases, and case preparation and courtroom presentation. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 201 Corequisite(s): CRJ 430L Credits: 3 (2,3)

CRJ 440 Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency

This course introduces the technologies associated with bitcoin and cryptocurrency, including their cryptographic building blocks and security, bitcoin’s consensus mechanism, individual components of bitcoin protocol, storage and usage of bitcoin, bitcoin mining, anonymity, community, politics, and regulation, alternative mining puzzles, bitcoin as a platform, altcoins and cryptocurrency ecosystem, and the future of bitcoin. Prequisite(s): CRJ 311 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

CRJ 490 Topics in Criminal Justice

A study of specific applications of Criminal Justice/Security Systems, with emphasis on student participation and written assignments. Critical thinking will be developed and demonstrated through understanding and interpreting the theory and practical concepts presented. Policies and advancements in the criminal justice field will be analyzed according to their advancement of knowledge and tactics used in various types of investigations and analyses. Prerequisite(s): Contingent on selected topic Credits: 3 (3,0)

DENTAL HYGIENE

DEN 015 Skills Refresher Course

This course is designed to assist students in maintaining their clinical skills following a break in their clinical sequence. Demonstration of clinical competency prior to re-entering the clinical sequence is necessary to ensure proper patient treatment. Additionally students who have not acquired sufficient clinical skills in their clinical course work will have the opportunity to remediate in this course. Credits: 2 (2 to 5,0)

DEN 102 Dental Materials and Expanded Functions

This course is concerned with the study of dental materials that are employed in dentistry for the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations. It will provide the student with a basic understanding of the various procedures, materials, and devices commonly used in dental practice. Emphasis will be placed on the physical and chemical properties of dental materials and how these properties affect the care and manipulation of the materials. Basic laboratory techniques, as well as expanded functions, will be performed in the lab. Spring. Prerequisite(s): DEN 105 Corequisite(s): DEN 102L Credits: 3 (2,2)

DEN 105 Dental and Oral Anatomy

The study of the anatomy of the oral, facial complex and the morphology of the dentitions. Emphasis is placed on technical dental terminology as well as occlusion. This course includes a co-requisite laboratory designed to provide experience in mastering tooth morphology and occlusion. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Dental Hygiene Program. EGL 101, CHM 124 (or High School Chemistry/Lab) and BIO 166, all with a minimum grade of C Corequisite(s): DEN 105L Credits: 3 (2,3)

DEN 106 Oral Radiology I

This course acquaints the student with the nature of ionizing radiation, the history of x-rays, and their production and properties. The theory and practice of exposing, processing, mounting, and analyzing dental radiographs and digital images are covered as well as radiation dosage, radiation hazards, and protective devices for patient and operator. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anatomic landmarks and the differentiation of these from conditions which indicate abnormality or disease. This course includes a co-requisite laboratory which includes two hours per week of laboratory activity. Prerequisite(s): DEN 105, with a minimum grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (2,2)

DEN 108 Oral Histology and Embryology

This course reviews basic histological tissues. Microscopic structures of the oral tissues are studied and include the hard palate, soft palate, tongue, lips, salivary glands and tonsils. Emphasis is on the development of the face, the oral cavity and, in specific, the tooth and its surrounding tissues. Spring. Prerequisite(s): DEN 105 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 110 Preventive Oral Health Concepts I

This course is an introduction to the study of Dental Hygiene. It includes an overview of the dental hygiene profession to include current and future roles of the dental hygienist. Special emphasis is placed on the hygienist as periodontal co-therapist, the responsibility of the dental hygienist to the profession and the development and strengthening of values that pertain to the profession of dental hygiene. Other topics to be covered include: principles of instrument design and use; disease transmission control; etiology and role of dental biofilm and calculus; importance of medical histories; measuring and recording of vital signs; office emergencies and planning implications for the medically compromised patient. Fall. Corequisite(s): DEN 105, 105L, 115 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 115 Clinical Dental Hygiene I

This is a clinical course in the practical application of dental hygiene techniques with supplemental discussions related to the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Emphasis is placed on proper patient and operator positioning, use of dental equipment, maintenance of an aseptic environment, intra and extra oral exams, measuring and recording of vital signs, instrumentation principles and techniques, recognizing and removing hard and soft deposits. Polishing and sharpening of instruments along with techniques and theory are included. Fall. Corequisite(s): DEN 105, 105L and 110 Credits: 3 (1,0,8)

DEN 126 Periodontology

A basic understanding of the principles and concepts associated with periodontology, including a detailed study of the periodontal tissues in both health and disease. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the dental hygienist as a periodontal co-therapist in the development of skills necessary to provide initial non-surgical and supportive periodontal therapy within the framework of a comprehensive dental hygiene care plan. Spring. Prerequisite(s): DEN 105,110, 115 and BIO 220 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 201 Pain Management

This course is designed to provide an in depth study of anesthesia and pain control as it is used in Dentistry. The mechanism of actions of anesthetic agents as well as other methods of pain control will be studied, demonstrated, and practiced. This course has a co-requisite laboratory that allows students the opportunity to practice the administration of local anesthesia. Prerequisite(s): DEN 102, 106, 108, 220, 225, and 126 Credits: 2 (1,2)

DEN 203 Principles of Nutrition for Oral Health Professionals

This course is designed to educate the dental hygiene student in basic principles of nutrition, metabolism and digestion. There is an emphasis on the biochemical function of carbohydrates, protein, lipids, vitamins, and minerals as they relate to health and wellness, nutrition and disease, energy balance, eating disorders, and the oral manifestations of nutritional deficiency. Nutrition labeling, nutrition guidelines and dietary analysis of a client’s diet and review of pertinent nutrition literature is essential to the dental hygiene process of care and therefore, is an important component to the scope of this course’s requirements. Fall. Prerequisite(s): CHM 124 (or High School Chemistry/Lab) Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 205 Oral Pathology

The study of the fundamentals of microscopic and gross pathology. Discussion of general pathologic processes with emphasis on pathology of the oral, dental, and periodontal tissues and their etiology and prevention. Fall. Prerequisite(s): BIO 166 Minimum Grade: C and BIO 220 Minimum Grade: C and DEN 220 and 225 Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 207 Oral Radiology II

Laboratory activities and experiences are designed to provide students with further practice in developing skills with intra-oral radiographic techniques. In addition, students will learn supplemental techniques that are not limited to, but include occlusal, extra-oral, digital, panoramic and specialized patients. Interpretations of radiographs will be emphasized, with integration of the role radiographs play in the dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment planning. Fall. Prerequisite(s): DEN 106 Credits: 1 (0,2)

DEN 212 Pharmacology

This course is designed to educate the dental hygiene student in the principles of pharmacology as they pertain to dentistry. In particular, the student will be taught the basics of organic compound structure, classification and nomenclature by the IUPAC system. The course will cover prescription writing, drug uptake, synthesis and elimination by the body, and the Krebs Cycle. Drugs studied will include, opioids, non-opioids, anti-infective agents, local and general anesthetics, anti-anxiety and psychotherapeutic agents, autonomic drugs, cardiovascular drugs, corticosteroids, hormones, histamines and fluoride. Students will learn how to think critically about a patient’s health history and how the patient’s medications may affect or be affected by dental office procedures. Prerequisite(s): CHM 124 (or High School Chemistry/Lab), BIO 166, 220 and DEN 220, 225 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 220 Preventive Oral Health Concepts II

This course is a continuation of the study of Dental Hygiene. This course includes a detailed study of such preventive dental hygiene techniques as fluorides, nutritional counseling, patient motivation and management, oral physiotherapy techniques. Also covered are discussions on dental hygiene care planning, dental biofilm, calculus, caries, dental products, desensitization, periodontal and restorative charting. A research paper on an aspect of preventive dentistry will be expected from each student. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 105, DEN 110, DEN 115 Corequisite(s): DEN 225 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 221 Community Oral Health I

This course is an introduction to the concepts and core principles of community oral health and provides the student with an orientation to the role of the dental hygienist as educator, resource person and consumer advocate in the field of dental public health. An introduction to epidemiology and research principles will promote a better understanding of scientific literature. In addition, the student will develop the skills necessary to assess various target populations and select educational strategies that will effectively provide culturally appropriate oral health education programs. Fall Prerequisite(s): DEN 110 and 115 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 222 Community Oral Health II

This course is a continuation of the study of Community Oral Health I. Public health concepts, theories and their application at the federal, state and local levels will be explored. In addition, students will develop the skills necessary to complete a community oral health needs assessment. Participation in public health education projects is required. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 221W Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 225 Clinical Dental Hygiene II

A continuation of the practical applications of dental hygiene techniques with supplemental lectures and discussions related to the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 105, DEN 110, DEN 115 Corequisite(s): DEN 220 Credits: 3 (1,0,8)

DEN 230 Preventive Oral Health Concepts III

This course is a continuation of the development, assessment and evaluation of dental hygiene practice and knowledge through a variety of classroom techniques. Values' clarification, new advancements/technology, and current preventive methods will be discussed. Preventive oral health techniques and treatment care in association with special needs patients will be emphasized. It is intended that the student will utilize this information to assist him or her clinically to develop a patient specific protocol and comprehensive treatment plan for the child, adolescent, adult, geriatric and medically compromised patient. Fall Prerequisite(s): DEN 220, 225 and BIO 220 Corequisite(s): DEN 235 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 235 Clinical Dental Hygiene III

A continuation of the development of and application of dental hygiene skills and knowledge through clinical practice in hospitals and clinics both on and off campus. Clinical participation with new innovations, and current preventive techniques in the practice of dental hygiene and application of the expanded roles of the dental hygienist will be emphasized. Fall Prerequisite(s): DEN 220, 225 and BIO 220 Corequisite(s): DEN 230 Credits: 4 (1,0,12)

DEN 240 Dental Practice Management, Ethics and Jurisprudence

Through a variety of classroom techniques, the development assessment and evaluation of dental hygiene practice will be continued. Lectures and discussions will focus on current issues in dental hygiene including ethics, jurisprudence, dental law, practice management and alternative practice settings. Presentations will be held on resume writing and role playing for job interviewing. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 230, 235 and BIO 220 Corequisite(s): DEN 245 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 245 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

A continuation of the development of and application of dental hygiene skills and knowledge through clinical practice in hospitals and clinics both on and off campus. Clinical participation with new innovations and current preventive techniques in the practice of dental hygiene and application of the expanded roles of the dental hygienist will be emphasized as well as dental practice management concepts. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 201, 230, 235 and BIO 220 Corequisite(s): DEN 240 Credits: 5 (1,0,16)

DEN 301W Current Issues in Dental Hygiene (Writing Intensive)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the current issues facing oral health care professionals as they approach the new millennium. The course will cover topics ranging from the changing role of the dental hygienist and the policies needed to support the American Dental Hygienists' Association's strategic goals, to information on trends in population demographics, self regulation/independent practice for the registered hygienist, along with government and managed care's alliance with political, economic, technological influences and its effect on the profession of dental hygiene. The course will also review the professional code of ethics and standards for dental hygienists along with gender as an issue. This is a writing intensive course. Fall Note: DEN 301W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): Associate degree in Dental Hygiene and EGL 101 with a C or higher Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 302 Principles of Dental Anesthesia

This course is designed to provide an in depth study of anesthesia and pain management through the use of local anesthetic agents and the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation. The mechanism of actions of anesthetic agents as well as indications and contraindications for use, and the treatment of complications and emergencies are stressed. Other methods of pain control will be discussed through research and presentations. This course meets the New York State Education’s Department’s requirements for certification in the administration and monitoring of local infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia in the practice of dental hygiene. This course has a co-requisite laboratory that allows students the opportunity to practice efficient techniques of pain management through local anesthesia on clinical partners under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Prerequisite(s): DEN 102, DEN 106, DEN 108, DEN 126, DEN 212, DEN 220, and DEN 225 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 302L Credits: 2 (1,3)

DEN 303 Practice Management for Quality Assurance

This course will involve students with concerns related to practice management. Emphasis will be placed on assuring quality care while focusing on the principles and concepts of a client-centered practice environment in our evolving health delivery system. Economics for the practice, office management, comprehensive care plans, and the use of new technology will be explored to support the practice goals. Fall Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene Credits: 3 (2,2)

DEN 309 Oral Epidemiology in Public Health

Oral epidemiology in public health will explore the distribution and determinants of oral health-related conditions such as dental caries, periodontal disease, and oral cancer in specified populations. An in depth view on the uses of epidemiology, as it relates to the health of the public, will enable the student to document oral health needs, evaluate existing oral health programs and interventions. Students will be introduced to the role of oral epidemiology in controlling oral health problems in the community. Fall. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene. Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 310 Teaching Strategies for Health Care Educators

The Principles of education, teaching, methodology, and instructional design utilized by health care educators in schools, community outreach, hospitals, other skilled nursing facilities, and/or higher education institutions are covered in this course. Topics include performance objectives, competencies, lesson planning, syllabi construction, analysis, and formative evaluation of instruction; traditional and non-traditional teaching methodologies; academic course development; current issues in dental health and dental hygiene education. Spring Prerequisite(s): DEN 220 and DEN 322 or Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene. Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 322 Dental Public Health Planning

This course will provide the students with the concepts of dental public health. These principles include health literacy, oral epidemiology, and methods used to measure dental disease in a given population. Emphasis will be placed on the process of program assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation to design an intervention program to improve oral health in the community. Evidence-based prevention and research principles will be explored. In addition, students will be involved in statistical analyses that will prepare them to become patient advocates and resource persons in the dental public health setting. Prerequisite(s): DEN 220 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 330 Essentials of Clinical Practice Theory

This course is designed to increase the knowledge of dental hygiene practice. It is a continuation of the development, and assessment of the dental hygiene process of care. This course combines the integration of theory with clinical experience in a variety of oral hygiene preventive and therapeutic procedures. New advancements in patient care as well as the introduction of new technology and current preventive methods will be analyzed and discussed. Students will apply the knowledge gained and utilize the information to develop patient specific protocols and comprehensive treatment plans in the provision of care for the child, adolescent, adult, geriatric and special needs patient. Prerequisite(s): DEN 220, DEN 225 BIO 220T with a grade of C or higher Corequisite(s): DEN 335 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 335 Essentials of Clinical Practice I

This clinical course is designed to build on the foundational knowledge of dental hygiene care. There is a concentration on the development of clinical skills through the application and delivery of oral health services. A case based approach is implemented, with emphasis on dental hygiene concepts, to foster critical thinking and problem solving abilities. Clinical experiences focus on advanced instrumentation techniques and innovative advancements that include diagnostic, therapeutic and treatment technologies. Prerequisite(s): DEN 126, DEN 220, DEN 225 and BIO 220 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 330 Credits: 2 (0,0,6)

DEN 340 Dental Hygiene Law & Practice Management

This course will focus on the professional responsibility of dental hygienists. Emphasis will be placed on dental law, the professional code of ethics, core values, and standards. Situations focusing on integrity and ethical decision making will be highlighted. Additionally, topics ranging from non-traditional career paths, the changing role of the dental hygienist in alternative practice opportunities including self-regulation and independent practice will be reviewed. Relevant aspects of the political and economic influences of managed care and its impact on the profession of dental hygiene will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): DEN 302, DEN 330, DEN 335, and BIO 220 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 345 Credits: 2 (2,0)

DEN 345 Essentials of Clin Practice II

This course is a continuation of the development and application of dental hygiene skills and knowledge through clinical practice in hospitals and clinics both on and off campus. Clinical participation with new innovations and current preventive techniques in the practice of dental hygiene and application of the expanded roles of the dental hygienist will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): DEN 302, DEN 330, DEN 335, BIO 22O all with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

DEN 401W Health Science Research: Principles and Methods (Writing Intensive)

A profession seeking to enhance its professional stature strives for the continual development of a scientific body of knowledge fundamental to its practice. Dental hygiene research involves a systematic search for knowledge about issues of importance to the dental hygiene profession. This course is designed to develop skills in scientific research. Emphasis is placed on the research process which includes problem identification, hypothesis writing, research design data collection, and data analysis and data interpretation. This is a writing-intensive course. Fall Note: DEN 401W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene and MTH 110 or EGL101 with a C or higher and DEN 220 and DEN 322 Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 402 Gerontology

Gerontology is the study of aging. This course is designed to promote an understanding of the social, psychological, and biological aspects of the aging process and the relationship to health. The course will examine current theories of aging, demographic profiles of the older adult population, and the increased incidence of oral health problems as we age. Close examination of the aging process will enable the student to gain insight into the fastest growing portion of our population and recognize the needs of the elderly and the concerns of the 77 million baby boomers coming of age. Spring Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene or DEN 220, DEN 322 and DEN 330. Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 406W Proposals and Grant Management for Health Programs (Writing Intensive)

This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of proposal writing and researching grant funding sources. Students will demonstrate the preparation of supporting documentation of need, implementation, evaluation, and budgeting. The culminating project of the course will be assembling the segments of a program proposal or grant application into a final document that is worthy of submission. This is a writing-intensive course. Spring Note: DEN 406W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene and EGL 101 with a C or higher and DEN 309 Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 407 Dental Hygiene Practicum Seminar

This course is designed as a pre-requisite to DEN 409 Dental Hygiene Practicum. Students will have the opportunity to research and explore areas of special interest for their field placement practicum experience. Fall Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene. Completion of at least 4 of the core DEN courses, or permission of the Department. Credits: 1 (1,0)

DEN 409 Dental Hygiene Practicum

This course provides a foundational experience and will involve students in a 40-hour self-directed practicum that is multidimensional in its scope. The specialized areas of interest are expanded to include, but are not limited to, education, research, corporate/business, health care delivery systems, and specialized practice interests. Spring. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene and DEN 407, with a minimum grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

DEN 410 Dental Hygiene Study Abroad

Bachelor degree Dental Hygiene students are afforded the opportunity to expand their international perspective of the profession. The course explores the health care delivery system and practices of dental hygiene. Students will experience the role of the Dental Hygienist in various practice settings, develop a deeper understanding of the profession, participate in research investigations and explore areas of interest. Prerequisite(s): Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene, Permission of the Department. Credits: 4 (2,10)

DEN 430 Senior Seminar I

This course will enable students to explore the role of the dental hygienist in a multidisciplinary setting while examining the principles of leadership and professional development. The course will provide information on leadership styles, qualities, traits, and virtues, mentoring, advocacy, self-reflection, and team approach healthcare. In addition, the students will identify their leadership strengths and behavioral profile. The course will encourage students to consider opportunities for professional development and team based collaborative healthcare relative to dental hygiene. Prerequisite(s): DEN 340 and DEN 345 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 435 Credit(s): 1 (1,0)

DEN 435 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice I

This course will provide students the opportunity to advance their instrumentation and patient management skills through the participation in a dental hygiene residency program at various health care settings. Additionally, this course will emphasize the treatment of the periodontally involved patient including assessment, treatment planning, implementation of care and maintenance. Students will apply the concepts of peer evaluation and interprofessional education to prepare them for the demands of treating the more complicated patient in today’s healthcare environment. Time management skills will be enhanced in order to prepare students for demanding patient schedules in the workplace. Prerequisite(s): DEN 340 and DEN 345 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 430 Credits: 4 (0,0,12)

DEN 440 Senior Seminar II

This course will allow students to master the concepts of dental hygiene production in a dental healthcare setting. Students will investigate alternative practice settings and the emerging roles of the dental hygienist. Additionally, students will examine the role of financial planning, maximizing resources and career management, in order to gain the necessary skills for a successful dental healthcare practice. Prerequisite(s): DEN 430 and DEN 435 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 445 Credit(s): 1 (1,0)

DEN 445 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice II

This course is a continuation of Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice I. This capstone course will require students to present case studies utilizing advanced dental hygiene practice skills. Additionally, students will spend time in a healthcare facility dental hygiene residency program. Students will also provide care to patients in the Dental Hygiene Care Center at Gleeson Hall. Prerequisite(s): DEN 430 and DEN 435 with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite(s): DEN 440 Credits: 4 (0,0,12)

ECONOMICS

ECO 110 Introduction to Personal Finance

Students will learn how to navigate the financial decisions they must face and how to make informed decisions related to budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes, saving, investing, inheritance, and living independently. The course will develop financial literacy skills, an understanding of economic principles, and will provide a basis for responsible citizenship and career success. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 120 The Global Economy

This course provides an overview of current global economic issues. Basic economic concepts are introduced in order to explain differences in the level of development among countries, the direction of trade, the causes and effects of international financial crises, and the motivations of some countries to transition to a market economy. The course also discusses the way in which countries coordinate efforts to deal with matters of international concern such as pollution and global warming. Topics also include the role of international institutions including the World Bank, the international Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, and the United Nations. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 156 Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics)

This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as unemployment, inflation, national income and economic growth. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of the economy. Analytical tools will be used to understand the experiences of the United States and other countries, and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 157 Principles of Economics (Microeconomics)

This course introduces students to fundamental economic concepts and theory, including demand, supply, and the formation of equilibrium prices in product and resource markets. Students will learn a specific set of analytical tools as well as how to apply them to current policy issues. In addition, the course offers an introduction to applied fields such as industrial organization (market structures), labor economics, international trade, and market failure. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 205 Introduction to Social Science Modeling

This course introduces students to the technique of social science modeling by learning and applying a variety of different models of individual and social behavior. It will use basic concepts in probability and simple economic models (including, but not limited to, supply and demand, two-person prisoners’ dilemma, and indifference curves) to understand issues such as competition, purchasing/investment decisions, risk-taking and risk-avoiding behavior, diversity, and collective action. This course is designed for all students interested in getting a deeper exposure to economics than is available at the 100 level, and economics majors preparing to take more advanced classes in economics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credit(s): 3 (3,0)

ECO 250 Quantitative Analysis for Economics

This course introduces students to basic mathematical techniques used in economic analysis. It applies differential calculus and linear algebra to economic analysis. Topics include: functions, equations in economics, constrained optimization, partial differentiation, and linear algebra. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and 157 and (MTH 117 or 129) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 255 Money and Banking

A description of American central banking, the structure and development of commercial banks and non-bank financial intermediaries, the nation's money and capital markets, bank regulation and supervision, monetary theory and its policy implications, and the operation of the system in international payments. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 259 Contemporary Economic Issues and Problems

Explores and analyzes the problems and issues of inflation, unemployment, and the necessity of urban renewal, the growth of corporate conglomerates, and the social and political ramifications in the world's money markets, together with the reasons giving rise to these occurrences. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 260 Intermediate Microeconomics

This course provides students with a critical examination and introduction to the analysis of markets, demand theory, production, theory of the firm, market structure, general equilibrium and welfare analysis, and introductory game theory. The course introduces students to introductory modeling and mathematical methods used in microeconomics to model and estimate demand relationships, production functions, market behavior, and risk and uncertainty. Prerequisite(s): ECO 157 and (MTH 117 or 129) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 262 Managerial Economics

This course introduces students to the use of economic methods for managerial decision-making. The focus of the course is on the practical application of economic techniques to business problems, including: the theory of the firm, demand estimation, production functions, cost estimation, market structure, pricing strategy, and game theory. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for ECO 260 Prerequisite(s): ECO 157 and (MTH 117 or 129) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 270 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Study of aggregate economic analysis. With attention to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation (IS-LM); Fiscal and monetary stabilization policies critically examines both theories, and the policies associate with them; the macroeconomic implications of fixed and flexible exchange rates in the presence of international capital mobility supply-sided economics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and (MTH 117 or MTH 129) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 303 Arts and Entertainment Economics

An analysis and in-depth study of the economics and economic impact of the arts and entertainment activities. Topics include arts demand and supply, live performing and cultural arts, profit and non-profit entertainment industries, music and film industry (recorded arts) arts venues, museums, and performing arts centers and economic models of nonprofit cultural organizations. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 and 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 304 Sports Economics

An analysis and in-depth study of the economics and economic impact of professional and amateur sports. Topics include team and league structures, labor relations, stadium financing, consumer demand for sports, and the role and impact of public and private subsidies. The student should be able to: identify and explain the economic principles and problems associated with sports team ownership, stadium economics, as well as the impact and effects of radio and television broadcast rights on sports economics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 310 Health Economics and Policy

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the application of economic thinking to the analysis of health policy and health systems. Specifically, we will survey the organization, financing and delivery of health services, the economic evaluation of alternative methods of providing health care, priority setting and resource allocation and the health behaviors of individuals. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or 157 and junior level standing Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 312 Economics of Non-Profit Organizations

This course provides an overview of the regulatory and legal constraints that nonprofit organizations face in the global economy. Students will analyze the strategies nonprofits use in adapting to fluctuating economic and political circumstances. The course will focus on the development of national, international, and transnational nonprofit organizations and the challenges embedded in the regions and industries in which they operate. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or 157 and junior level standing Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 320 Internet and Network Economics

A study of the economic structure and growth of the modern economy focusing on the effect and impact of emerging technologies on industry, employment, financial markets and market structure. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 321 Engineering Economics

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the economic aspects of engineering in terms of the evaluation of engineering proposals with respect to their worth and cost. Topics include: introduction to Engineering Economics; interest and interest formulas; equivalence and equivalence calculations; evaluation of replacement alternatives and operational activities; basic fundamentals of cost accounting. Prerequisite(s): Admission to a Tech Program or approval of this Department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 330 Modern Economic Thought

The purpose of this course is to study the most important economic theories of the recent past in order to gain a better understanding, not only of these earlier economic theories, but also of the nature of economic theory in general and of the strengths and weaknesses of modern micro and macro-economics and policymaking. We will study the major schools of Modern Economic Thought -Neo-Classical, Austrian, Keynesian, Monetarist, etc. We will examine these theories to trace the long term thought on economic problems like value theory, money and inflation, free trade, macro- economics stability, etc. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 340 International Trade

First of a two semester offering to provide a comprehensive exposition of the theory and principles of international trade, the importance of international trade in interdependent economics, and a knowledge of international trade institutions and how they relate to U.S. commercial policy. The material will employ an analytical as well as historical and institutional approach. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 341 International Finance

Second half of a two semester offering to provide theoretical and practical knowledge of international finance, its relationships to financial markets, and the international monetary system as it relates to the U.S. economy. The course work will focus on balance of payments, foreign exchange markets and the international monetary system. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 342 Financial Economics

This course introduces students to the basic mathematical models, techniques and forms of analysis used in financial economic analysis. Topics covered include uncertainty and financial decision-making, mean-variance model of portfolio selection, Black-Scholes option pricing formula, utility functions, computational techniques and stochastic volatility. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 350 Economics of Global Disasters

This course focuses on the inter-relationship between natural and manmade hazards and disasters and the economy. Disasters within the economic and sociology literature arise when an event impacts the physical, social and economic infrastructure beyond its normal absorptive capacity. Topics covered and examined include natural hazards and their effects on regional development, manmade disasters, methods of hazard analysis, impact estimation techniques, and disaster planning and mitigation, public policy and issues. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 358 Economics of Labor

Economics of Labor explores how individuals enhance their economic well-being through their work behavior and examines the role of labor markets in explaining disparities of wealth. Topics include the static labor market and its internal structure, the composition of the labor force, the nature of a job search, the life cycle human capital model, determination and classification of wages and wage structure, the American labor movement and the role of labor unions. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 360 Introduction to Experimental Economics

This course will introduce students to the intersection of two research programs: behavioral economics and analytic game theory. Students will leave this class able to make predictions using game theory and will understand how bounded rationality affects those predictions. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 380 Econometrics

Students will learn and apply statistical methods used in empirical economic analysis. The course will cover the following topics: the fundamentals of probability and statistics, hypothesis testing, multivariate linear regression using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), the statistical properties of OLS under less than ideal circumstances, the use of dummy variables, and specification analysis. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110 and (MTH 117 or MTH 129) and (ECO 156 or ECO 157) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 390 Special Topics in Economics

This course enables students to explore a range of diverse topical and current issues in economics and will require extensive readings, analysis, and written work. Students should consult with the department prior to registering for this course. Prerequisite(s): ECO 156 or ECO 157 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 401 Industrial Organization

This course teaches students how to apply industrial organization theory to data. The course will cover strategic models of firm competition and analyze industrial policy issues. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the microeconomic and game theoretic frameworks necessary to study simplified models in industrial organization. Students will analyze topics including monopoly, oligopoly, cartels and collusion, market structure, price discrimination, product differentiation, technological change, advertising, and auction mechanisms. Prerequisite(s): ECO 250 and (ECO 260 or ECO 262) and senior level standing Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 410 Public Finance

This course introduces students to the issues, interactions and inter-relationships arising between the market and government policy-making. Topics covered include: tools of public finance, budget analysis, externalities, political economy, cost-benefit analysis, taxation and policy, social insurance, income distribution and welfare. Prerequisite(s): (ECO 260 or 262) and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 412 Cost-Benefit Analysis

This course will focus on the principles of applied economic and welfare analysis. The basic theory of cost-benefit analysis is presented and its relevance for social policy analysis is established. Applications of cost-benefit analysis are examined in the light of management decision making, theoretical grounding in finance, accounting, marketing, investment and planning. The applications of cost-benefit analysis in the health care, non-profit, entertainment, transportation and information technology sectors are also examined. Prerequisite(s): (ECO 260 or 262) and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 420 Economics of Science and Technology

This course is an examination of technology based growth and development both in historical and current contexts. Topics include technology-based economic development, the role of human capital, technology transfer, intellectual property rights and patents, and network economics. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or 262 and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 430 Urban and Regional Economics

This course will focus on the economics of cities and regions as well as the challenges faced by economic agents in urban areas. Students will gain an understanding of the economic forces that lead to the development of cities and their cohesion within regional economies. The course will enrich the typical spaceless economic analysis by introducing a spatial dimension. Students will focus on analyzing and prescribing policy to address the challenges of crime, transportation, firm location, housing, education, and local government in the local and regional economies. Prerequisite(s): (ECO 260 or 262) and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 435 Environmental Economics and Policy

This course provides a survey of the fundamental concepts underlying economic approaches to environmental policy, illustrates applications of these concepts in the real world and offers students the opportunity to apply their new knowledge toward understanding a current environmental problem. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or 262 and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 440 Topics in Applied Economics

A treatment of diverse topics chosen by the department for their importance in current economics. The course will require extensive reading, analysis and written work depending on the topic. Students should check with the department before registering for this course regarding anticipated topics for the semester. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or 262 and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 441 Economics of Gender

In this class economics theory and analysis will be used to address questions on gender differences in education, career choices, household decisions, and earnings. Models of labor supply and demand, allocation of resources within household, human capital, earning equation, and discrimination will be introduced and data will be examined to test these economic theories. Gender-related policy issues and applications will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or 262 and (ECO 255 or 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 450 International Development Economics

This course will introduce some of the fundamental questions and issues surrounding the development process including topics such as: economic structure, economic growth models dual sector models, export led growth, as well as a range of applied and historical examples including an overview of African, Asian, and Latin American development experiences, and current issues in economic development. Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or 262 or ECO 255 or 270 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 480 Forecasting

This course the methodology and applications of econometric forecasting and time series analysis. Topics include linear regression model, stationarity, modeling seasonality, arima models, and volatility. Prerequisite(s): ECO 380 and 260 or (ECO 262 and 255 or ECO 270) Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 489 Economic Internship

Advanced third and fourth year applied economics students will be placed in a public or private sector setting in which the student will be able to gain work experience in applied economics analysis. A written report on the internship experience is required of the student at the conclusion of the internship. Students may not repeat this course for credit. Prerequisite(s): ECO 262 and ECO 260 or (ECO 250 and 255 or ECO 270) Credits: 3 (1,0,6 to 33)

ECO 490W Economic Research and Reporting (Writing Intensive)

This course introduces students to the methods and techniques of economic analysis, data and statistical analysis, interpretation of results, documentation, article preparation, and the report presentation. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for ECO 490 and 490W; ECO 490W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Economics Department Prerequisite(s): ECO 260 or ECO 262 and (ECO 270 or ECO 255) and ECO 250 and ECO 380 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

ECO 491 Applied Economic Analysis

This course is a follow-up to the economic research and reporting course. Its goal is to prepare the student to conduct independent research in consultation with their advisor, students will develop a senior project in an area of current economic interest. They will participate in seminar and present their research, culminating in a completed report and presentation on their research topic. Prerequisite(s): ECO 490 or 490W Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

EET 104 DC/AC Circuits

An introductory course to the fundamentals and basic principles of DC and AC circuits. Topics covered include: The definition of current, voltage and passive circuit elements such as, resistors, capacitors, and inductors, through their I-V characteristic relationships. Ohm's Law Power, Kirchoff's Current and Voltage Laws, Voltage and Current Divider Rules, and their basic applications in the analysis of series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. The fundamental Network Theorems, Superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's equivalent circuits and Maximum Power Transfer. AS signal waveforms and their Average and RMS value, alternating current, voltage and power resistors, capacitors and inductors in AC circuits, ideal transformers and the concept of resonance. Introduction to the operation and basic applications of first order passive, low and high pass, RC filters. Corequisite(s): MTH 129 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 105 Introduction to Digital Electronics

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of Digital Electronics. Topics covered: Number systems, Boolean Algebra, Logic Gates, Combinational Circuits, Karnaugh Map Minimization Techniques, Adders, Signed Numbers, Multiplexers, Code-Converters, Decoders, Encoders, Comparators and 7-segment displays. The laboratory component of the course reinforces the topics covered in the theory through relevant experiments performed by students using logic trainers. Corequisite(s): EET 111 or EET 104 Credits: 2 (1,3)

EET 110 Computer Applications

An introduction to computer programming with applications. Examples and assignments are drawn from problems in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology. The course uses Windows based PCs, the "C/C++" programming language (visual C++), and IEEE-488 Standard interfacing to programmable instrumentation. Prerequisite(s): EET 111 Credits: 2 (1,2)

EET 111 Electric Circuits I

A basic course in direct current circuit theory. Concepts of charge, current and voltage; Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's Laws; analysis of series, parallel, and combination circuits; mesh and nodal analysis; Superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; maximum power transfer theorem; electric fields and capacitance; magnetic fields and inductance; analysis of R-C and R-L switching networks. The laboratory is coordinated with, and supports, the theory course. Corequisite(s): MTH 129 Credits: 4 (3,2,1)

EET 113 Electric Circuits II

This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to provide the background needed to analyze electric networks. Topics covered in this course include sinusoidal waveforms and non-sinusoidal waveforms; the phasor representation of sinusoidal signals; the use of complex numbers to analyze R-C, R-L, and R-L-C networks under sinusoidal steady-state conditions; series and parallel resonance; average power calculations; simple passive filters, frequency response (dB magnitude and phase) and its relations to the step response of simple R-C, R-L and R-L-C networks; transformer principles and types of transformers; three phase balance systems. Prerequisite(s): EET 111 and MTH 129 Credits: 4 (3,2,1)

EET 118 Semiconductor Devices and Circuits

Fundamentals of semiconductor diodes and bipolar junction transistors are discussed in this course. Topics covered include: Q point operating conditions of semiconductor diodes in various circuit configurations, full and half-wave rectification, capacitor input filters, zener diodes and basic linear DC power supply configurations. Q point operating conditions of BJT transistors in various bias configurations are analyzed as well as small signal single-stage and multi-stage amplifiers at mid-band frequencies in terms of voltage gain, current gain, power gain, input impedance, output impedance, AC load lines and signal node voltages. Corequisite(s): EET 113 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 191 Electric Circuits Concepts and Components

An introductory lecture/demonstration course in the terminology, concepts, and components of electric circuits. The aim is to give students from other disciplines (e.g. Office Management, Nursing, etc.) sufficient knowledge and understanding to effectively communicate with technical specialists in this field. Prerequisite(s): Sequential (Integrated) Math 1 Credits: 4 (4,0)

EET 200 Electronic Devices & Circuits

Principles and characteristics of semiconductor devices and linear integrated circuits are discussed. Devices studied include: semiconductor diodes, zener diodes, bipolar junction transistors, photodiodes and transistors, field- effect and metal oxide semiconductor transistors, thryristors , and operational amplifiers in various DC power supply, small signal and power amplifier configurations as well as wave shaping circuits. Simulation software will be used throughout the course in both theory and laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s): EET 104 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 223 Digital Electronics

Analysis and design of combinational and sequential logic circuits. SSI and MSI circuits; flip-flops, counters, and shift registers; integrated circuit families; multiplexers; semiconductor memory devices; D/A and A/D converters. The associated laboratory reinforces the topics covered in the theory through relevant experiments performed by the student. A formal report is part of the laboratory requirement. Prerequisite(s): EET 105, EET 118 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 224 Amplifiers

Signal parameters of Class A and Class B power amplifiers as well as operational amplifiers are studied in this course. Topics covered include, efficiency, dB, dBm, heat sinks, JFET and MOSFET transistors, operational amplifiers, and the frequency response of amplifier circuits. In addition, operational amplifier characteristics and models are used in the analysis of open loop and closed loop amplifiers. Adders, subtractors, active filters, comparators, differentiators, integrators, and the Schmitt trigger are also studied. Feedback concepts and the effect of feedback on gain, impedance and frequency response of amplifiers are studied as well as circuit stability, gain, and phase margins. Simulation software is used in the analysis of operating conditions and frequency response of amplifiers. Formal Report writing is part of the Laboratory requirement. Prerequisite(s): EET 118 Corequisite(s): EET 110, MTH 130 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 225 Communications Electronics

An introduction to communication signals and circuits. Topics include: filters, simple audio and RF oscillators, interpretation and application of Fourier series; mathematics of amplitude; frequency and phase modulation; basic transmitter circuitry; superheterodyne receivers for various modulation methods; multiplexing techniques including FM stereo multiplexing. Introduction to Digital Transmission Techniques as time permits. Prerequisite(s): EET 224 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 251 Microprocessors

Fundamental microprocessor and microcontroller concepts; architecture, memory, memory interfacing, programming, signals, timing, delay calculations, I/O interfacing and interrupts. The students will be required to interface input and output devices to the embedded controller and quantify associated hardware/software trade-offs. Laboratory work requires programming in assembly language and in C/C++. Prerequisite(s): EET 223 Credits: 3 (2,3)

EET 311 Network Analysis

A calculus based network analysis course that introduces the use of Laplace transforms in the analysis of both active and passive lumped parameter time-invariant linear networks. Topics covered include Mesh and Nodal analysis using matrix formulations; the network theorems; impedance and the modeling of initial conditions; first and second order systems; transfer functions; poles and zeros; impulse and step response; forced and natural response as well as system stability and time domain response. The sinusoidal steady state (AC) phasor transformation and its relation to the Laplace transform and the frequency response of networks are also included. The laboratory utilizes simulation of electric networks. Corequisite(s): MTH 236 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 316 Digital Design

Introduction to Digital Design using FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) and VHDL (Hardware Description Languages). The FPGA circuits are designed using Schematic Capture as well as VHDL. The target chips are Xilinx FPGAs and Xilinx tools are used to simulate and to "place and route" the design. Designs are then tested using FPGA based platforms. Prerequisite(s): EET 223 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 317 Industrial Electronics

Selected topics involving Difference and Instrumentation amplifiers with Transducer Bridge applications. Linear and Switching mode regulated power supply operation with analysis and design techniques using existing industrial ICs Thyristor characteristics with SCR, DIAC and TRIAC applications in power control circuits. Theory concepts are illustrated in the laboratory. Formal report writing is part of the laboratory requirement. Prerequisite(s): EET 224 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 327 Signal Processing

The course will provide the students with an introduction to continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems. Topics to be covered include: Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) systems, Laplace transforms, transfer function, impulse and step response, transient and steady state responses, frequency response, Bode plots, passive and active filters, modulation, oscillators. Fourier series and Fourier transforms, power spectral density and Parseval’s theorem. Random signals and noise. Signal-to-noise ratio. Discrete-time signals. Sampling, filtering, convolution, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithms, and the z-transform. The use of MATLAB is integrated throughout the course in laboratory exercises, demonstrations and student projects. Prerequisite(s): EET 311 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 414 Transmission Lines and Antennas

Introduction to transmission lines. Transient response for conditions of matched and mismatched impedance. Definition of reflection and transmission coefficients. Sinusoidal signals, standing wave ratio and use of the Smith chart. Power measurement. Introduction to antennas. Radiation pattern and impedance of simple dipole antennas. Formal laboratory report writing required. Prerequisite(s): EET 225 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 418 Microprocessor Interfacing and Control

This course covers an in-depth study of microprocessor systems by exploring the internal functions of a computer. Hardware and software capabilities are studied in order to build a foundation for the design and interfacing of microprocessor based systems using real world examples. Assembly as well as a high level language such as "C++" is used in various programming projects and in interfacing devices. Prerequisite(s): EET 110 and EET 251 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 420 Linear Systems and Controls

This course covers the principles and characteristics of continuous time invariant linear systems and controls as well as the basic performance parameters and analysis techniques of such systems. Topics include: Review of Laplace Transforms and their applications in analyzing the performance of systems in terms of their impulse and step response; block diagram models, signal flow graphs, and state variable representation of systems; second order active filters and the performance characteristics of second order systems in terms of overshoot, speed and setting time. Feedback Control System characteristics, the Routh-Hurwitz stability criteria, and the application of Root Locus and Frequency Response techniques in the analysis of control systems are also covered. The laboratory utilizes MATLAB to demonstrate and enhance the theory principles covered in the lecture portion of the course. Prerequisite(s): EET 311 Corequisite(s): MTH 245 Credits: 4 (3,2)

EET 426 Digital Communications

An introduction to digital communications systems. Topics covered include; the sampling theorem; PCM systems; synchronization techniques; noise analysis and reduction; FSK; PSK; bit error rates; hamming codes; and an introduction to fiber optic systems. Prerequisite(s): EET 225 Credits: 3 (3,0)

EET 428 Advanced Microprocessors Theory

This course covers various hardware applications of a special purpose microprocessor systems and peripheral devices such as floating point processors and interrupt controllers. Practical approaches of interfacing the microprocessor with different systems are explored. Laboratory assignments make use of assembly level as well as a high level programming language. Prerequisite(s): EET 418 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 440 Data Communications and Networking

This course covers the basic concepts of networking and computer connectivity. Several network topologies and related media access techniques are explored. The rudiments of Data Communications and Open System Interconnection (OSI) are discussed in detail. Students will learn the components of a client server networks using the Novell's Net Ware/ Intra Net Ware. Certain protocols such as TCP/IP and SPX/IPX are also discussed. Laboratory experiments are designed to give students a hands on experience in Network administration, configuration and resource management. Completion of this course includes a final project related to the design of a local area network, complete with Layers I and II, as well as the Directory Tree Structure based on the netware. An oral presentation by each student of his/her project is required. Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of digital electronics; familiarity with a real time operating system; ability to program in a high level language. Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 441 Advanced Networking

This course is a continuation of EET 440, Networking and Data Communications. The principles of Architecture Layering, Multiplexing and Encapsulation are discussed. TCP/IP, IPX, PPP, ISDN and Frame Relay Protocols are covered. Network equipment such as repeaters, bridges router hubs and switches are studied in detail. Equipment examples are drawn from key vendors such as CISCO, 3COM and Cabletron. The laboratory portion of the course will concentrate on experiments and projects designed using CISCO Systems networking equipment, such as 2500 and 2600 series routers, 1900 and 2900 catalysts switches. The students will also learn how to design networks using VLANS on the above mentioned equipment. Prerequisite(s): EET 440 Credits: 4 (3,3)

EET 450 Design Concepts

General design considerations and concepts with particular emphasis in "worst case" design and "optimum" design. Case studies will be provided through examples of different areas of Electrical Engineering Technology. Product development procedures and processes will be presented along with testing and costing considerations. By the end of this course students must select their senior design project for EET 452W and must submit an appropriate proposal. Prerequisite(s): Completion of junior level EET courses or Department permission. Credits: 2 (2,0)

EET 452W Design Project (Writing Intensive)

The student's overall technical knowledge is applied to this "capstone" design project under the supervision of faculty. A complete oral and written presentation is required of each student explaining the design process and specifications, cost considerations, testing and/or computer simulation results when appropriate. Note: Students will be expected to write short exercises, as well as longer papers that will be revised and graded. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: EET 452W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): EET 450 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 2 (1,2)

EET 490 Selected Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology

Courses that range from 490-499 are selected topics of current interest in Computer and/or Electrical Engineering Technology. Prerequisite(s): Contingent upon selected topic Credits: 3 (2,3)

EET 491 Selected Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology

Courses that range from 490-499 are selected topics of current interest in Computer and/or Electrical Engineering Technology. Prerequisite(s): Contingent upon selected topic Credits: 3 (2,3)

EET 492 Selected Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology

Courses that range from 490-499 are selected topics of current interest in Computer and/or Electrical Engineering Technology. Prerequisite(s): Contingent upon selected topic Credits: 3 (2,3)

EET 493 Selected Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology

Courses that range from 490-499 are selected topics of current interest in Computer and/or Electrical Engineering Technology. Prerequisite(s): Contingent upon selected topic Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENGLISH

EGL 097 Basic Writing Skills

A developmental course concerned with the improvement of written communication skills. Students review grammar and mechanics, syntax, vocabulary, paragraph and essay organization, and reading skills. Students are required to pass an exit exam, and a pass/repeat grade is awarded for the course. This course is not applicable toward a degree. Fall, Spring, Pass/Repeat Grade will not be computed into GPA. 3 ncu (non-credit units) (3,0)

EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing

This is the first part of a required sequence in college essay writing. Students learn to view writing as a process that involves generating ideas, formulating and developing a thesis, structuring paragraphs and essays, as well as revising and editing drafts. The focus is on the development of critical and analytical thinking. Students also learn the correct and ethical use of print and electronic sources. At least one research paper is required. A grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Note: Students passing a departmental diagnostic exam given on the first day of class will remain in EGL 101; all others will be placed in EGL 097. Prerequisite is any of the following: successful completion of EGL 097; an SAT essay score (taken prior to March 1, 2016) of 7 or higher; an SAT essay score (taken after March 1, 2016) of 5 or higher; on-campus placement testing. Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 102 Composition II: Writing About Literature

This is the second part of the required introductory English composition sequence. This course builds on writing skills developed in EGL 101, specifically the ability to write analytical and persuasive essays and to use research materials correctly and effectively. Students read selections from different literary genres (poetry, drama, and narrative fiction). Selections from the literature provide the basis for analytical and critical essays that explore the ways writers use works of the imagination to explore human experience. Grade of C or higher is a graduation requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 105 Honors Freshman Composition

An interdisciplinary approach to reading and writing in such fields as philosophy, history, ethics, and science, emphasizing their interrelationships. Students explore issues in depth via term papers, presentations by guest speakers, and visits to museums, corporations, libraries, and theaters. Prerequisites: Permission of English/ Humanities department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 200 Shakespeare

A survey of representative comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories showing Shakespeare's dramatic variety. Acting styles are emphasized with the use of recordings, tapes and, when possible, live performances. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 201 English Literature: Old English through the 18th Century

A historical survey of English literature from the beginnings to neoclassicism. Consideration is given to Anglo-Saxon and medieval writers, Chaucer, Elizabethan and Jacobean writers, Shakespeare, Milton, and the writers of the Age of Reason. English history, religion, and philosophy are studied as they relate to literature. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 202 English Literature: 19th Century to the Present

An historical survey of Romantic, Victorian and Modernist literature. Emphasis is placed on the development and continuity of literary traditions. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 203 American Literature: Beginnings to 1865

An examination of major historical and new canonical American authors; genres, and periods of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and part of the nineteenth centuries up to the Civil War. An analysis of the works of writers of the New Republic, the Revolutionary and Federalist periods of the eighteenth century, as well as the emerging national literatures of indigenous and colonizing groups; the ages of Transcendentalism, American Gothic, early Realism as well as the works of Native American, Feminist, African-American, Abolitionist, Frontier and Civil War writers will be considered. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 204 American Literature: 1865 to the Present

An examination of major historical and new canonical American authors, genres and periods of the era from the Civil War through the twenty-first century. An analysis of such trends as Realism, Naturalism, immigrant literature, the regional and local color movements, as well as the rise of biographical genres, and the influence of psychology and technology on literature will be made. Modernism, the renaissance in American poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, and the literature of social critique will also be examined. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 204 and 204W; EGL 204W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 206 World Literature: Early Classics

An introduction to Western and non-Western literature from earliest times through the seventeenth century. Included are works from ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval and Renaissance Europe, the Middle East, Africa, China, and India. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 207 World Literature: The Moderns

An introduction to Western and non-Western literature from the eighteenth century through the twentieth century. Included are works from authors of the Enlightenment, the Romantic and Realist Movements, and the twentieth century from the Continent and the Third World. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 210 Introduction to Drama

A survey of Western drama stressing close reading of plays from ancient Greece, Elizabethan and Restoration England, nineteenth-century Scandinavia and Russia, and twentieth-century Britain and America. The changing concepts of comedy and tragedy are discussed. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 210 and 210W; EGL 210W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 212 Introduction to Fiction

A survey of American, British, and continental prose fiction. An understanding of the critical theory of such works is stressed. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 214 Introduction to Poetry

A survey of English language poetry. Selected works of both traditional and contemporary poets are analyzed and discussed. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 214 and 214W; EGL 214W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 216 Creative Writing

An introduction to a wide spectrum of written formats, especially those employed by writers of fiction and poetry. Students read in these genres and submit a short written piece, in either genre, for each class. In addition, students complete a major project in their chosen area. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 222 Women in Literature

An exploration of the position of women in various cultures as interpreted by major world writers. Focus is on the female protagonist's attainment of goals in marriage, family, and work. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 225 Images of Women in Drama

A study of images of women in Western drama from ancient times to the present. This course will consider the development of drama as a popular art form reflecting gender issues of its time. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 225 and 225W; EGL 225W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 226 Journalism

An introduction to practical journalism in which students write news and feature stories, editorials, and reviews, and examine techniques of newspaper design and photography. Classes include readings and discussions in the theory of mass communications. Student materials may be printed in campus publications. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for PCM 226. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 228 Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture

This course presents a cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary examination of the meaning and value of such myths as those of the creation, the flood, and the hero, and their depiction in literature, art, film, and music from the ancient past to the present. Students will acquire an understanding of the uses of mythical themes and archetypes both in ancient art and literature as well as in modern art, literature, and film. Course work includes assigned readings, film screenings, informal journals, a formal paper and exams. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 230 Literature of the Bible

A study of the origins, themes, and history of Biblical literature based on the new international version of the Bible. Later literature and other arts influenced by the Bible are included. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 232 Voices of Multicultural America

A study of selected fiction, poetry, autobiography and memoirs of American immigrants of the 20th and 21st centuries. The thematic focus of this course is the way in which writers from different cultures shape the stories of their lives, particularly as they encounter the realities of American experience and test the truth of their American dreams. Lecture and discussion of individual writers will address the different genres and styles used by these immigrant writers as well as thematic parallels and differences between writers from different cultural backgrounds. Readings may vary each semester but will reflect the cultural diversity of American immigrant writing, including writing by Caribbean writers, Asian-Americans, Latino Americanos, Jewish, Italian, Irish, and other Eastern European immigrants. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 240 Themes in Science Fiction in Film and Literature

An exploration of how writers of science fiction have used science and technology to examine moral questions, social issues and the boundaries of technology. Readings of selected authors will focus on the ways creative writers have explored various aspects of the genre, including scientific experimentation, alternate time/space continuum, weaponry, psychic phenomena, cyberspace, bionics, alien life and the future. The class will also view cinematic adaptations of the selected works to examine whether/how the change of medium affects the emphasis and impact of the work and how visualization and special effects affect the audience's perception. Course work includes assigned readings, film screenings, informal journals, and formal papers. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 242 Film and Literature

Students will read selected short fiction and novels by English, American and other writers and view the films that have been made from them by prominent directors. The course will develop students' understanding and appreciation of both literature and film. Students will examine how great writers elicit the complex response they do from their readers, and then explore the ways that film provides an interpretation of literature. Analysis and discussion will center on how the visual media shapes literature as various directors adapt texts for the screen. The ability to interpret the texts and films appreciatively and critically will be assessed through a series of class projects and examinations. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 242 and 242W; EGL 242W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 244 Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature

This course engages students in the principle forms of artistic expression integral to classic works of supernatural literature and their cinematic adaptations. Students will acquire an understanding of the creative process inherent in these works, an understanding of the literary and cinematic conventions of the genre and will also develop a critical vocabulary that will allow them to discuss and to evaluate these works and others in depth. Cinematic adaptations of these works in particular follow the evolution of the cinema itself; thus students in this course will also gain a critical understanding of its aesthetic and technological development. This course will also focus on film composition, including the shots, angles, iconography and editing typical of this genre. Course work includes assigned readings, informal and formal papers requiring primary and secondary research, critical analysis of required screenings, and exams. Students will be required to attend and to complete critical analyses of campus and off-campus theatrical screenings as they are scheduled. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 244 and 244W; EGL 244W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 246 Themes in Literature

This course will enable students to explore a major literary theme. The theme may vary in different semesters or in different sections of the course during a single semester. Themes may include nature writings, literature of the Holocaust, literature of the American West, and Long Island in fiction, among others. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 250 Young Adult Literature

Students will trace the historical and psychological development of the concept of “adolescence” by studying the canonical literature for young adults that shaped cultural ideas of adolescence. Students will read a wide representation of classic 20th century Young Adult authors, including Judy Blume, Robert Cormier, Chris Crutcher, Paula Danziger, S.E. Hinton, Harper Lee, Lois Lowry, Patricia MacLachlan, Walter Dean Meyers, Gary Paulsen, Cynthia Voigt, and Paul Zindel. The class focuses on the literary analysis of different Young Adult genres: dystopia, fantasy, historical fiction, realism, nonfiction, photojournalism, and graphic novels. Class is conducted through the innovative method of reading circles, and so requires active student participation. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 266 Fantasy in Literature and Film

Fantasy in Literature and Film examines not only the oldest literary genre but one that continues to fascinate readers old and young and to inspire some of the most innovative and technically sophisticated films. Works of fantasy overlap other genres: myth, fairy tales, epic sagas, tales of the grotesque, juvenilia, adventure stories, and some science fiction. However, fantasy is the study of what can never actually be real, that is, what we dream about or can only imagine. Readings include traditional works of fantasy from the earliest recorded texts as well as beloved children's and young adult "classics" of this genre. Film adaptations as well as original films in this genre will also be analyzed and critiqued. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 269 The Romantic Arts: Art, Dance, Literature and Music

This course examines the art, dance, literature and music of the Romantic Period of each of the disciplines. Students will acquire an understanding of the aesthetic concerns of each of these art forms in the period in which they were created and develop a critical vocabulary that will allow them to better understand, evaluate, and discuss the works in depth. Course work includes readings, field trips to art exhibits and performances, and extensive use of audio-visual materials. The course will require both informal and formal papers that utilize primary and secondary research materials. By examining multiple art forms, students will develop greater aesthetic and critical understanding of the art forms of the Romantic period included in the course study. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 269 and 269W; EGL 269W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 301 Advanced Grammar and Vocabulary

Students will master a study of descriptive and prescriptive English grammar and will become familiar with concepts of linguistics and semiology. Students will expand their vocabulary by learning the use of a broad range of words and by understanding their etymological roots, their appropriateness to situation and audience, and their function in smooth syntax. Students will develop skills leading to the use of precise, concise prose style. Mastery of grammar, vocabulary and style is essential to professional-level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and editing. Students completing this course may not receive credit for PCM 301. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 302 The 19th Century English Novel

Select novels by major British authors of the nineteenth century, such as Austen, the Brontes, Mary Shelley, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Trollope, Hardy and Conrad, are read. Attention is given to the social, economic, political and intellectual backdrop informing the content of the novels. Secondary sources are required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 307 Special Topics in Literature

This course will enable students to explore intensively a major author or literary theme, period or genre. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Topics may include love, lust and marriage; persuasion and propaganda; and World War I writers, among others. Short papers involving secondary sources will be required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 308 The City In Literature, Art, Film and Theatre

This course examines depictions and interpretations of the city through literature, film, theatre, photography, painting, sculpture and architecture. Initially, the focus will be on New York City, although subsequent semesters, it may extend to other major world cities such as London, Paris, Rome, or Athens. Students will gain an understanding of the aesthetic value of the different art forms as well as develop the critical vocabulary to help them evaluate the various literary and artistic works. Course work includes assigned readings, field trips to museums in New York City, and extensive use of audio-visual material. Both informal writing (response journals) and more formal papers, including a research paper utilizing primary research (photographs, maps, interviews with artists, slides etc.) and secondary critical and/or historical studies will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 308 and 308W; EGL 308W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 309 Voices of Black America in Poetry, Prose and Song

A study of the oral and literary tradition of African Americans in poetry, prose and song. This course provides both a historical examination of the written and oral tradition of African Americans in its own right and as a lens through which American culture can be viewed. The course will explore the developing aesthetic concerns of this tradition in different historical periods as, for example, the question of dialect before, during and after the Harlem Renaissance and the later Black Arts movement up through contemporary rap. Students will also consider how many texts by African Americans combine literary and musical forms, particularly spirituals, blues, jazz, hip hop and rap. Critical readings and research project required. Students who have completed EGL 224 may not receive credit for this course. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 310 Technical Writing

A detailed study of the fundamentals of writing technical reports and other technical communications. Topics emphasized include the elements of a technical report, the interpretation of statistics and data, and the composition of letters, memos, and informal reports containing technical information. Assignments and student exercises are drawn from the student's technical area. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 311 Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media

Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media will give students an overview of the issues concerning electronic media, including legal and ethical concerns. Students will also learn the history of the media, including the Internet and World Wide Web. Students will learn how to write for electronic media in hands-on training in the school's computer labs using industry-standard programs. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for PCM 311. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 312 Major Authors in American Literature

An in-depth examination of the major trends in American Literature as reflected specifically through the works of individual authors. The instructor will select the two or three authors to be studied each semester. Secondary sources, a major research project, and an annotated bibliography of criticism of a particular work will be required. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 312 and 312W; EGL 312W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 314 Major Authors in World Literature

An in-depth examination of major trends in world literature as reflected through the works of individual authors. One to three authors are studied each semester. Requirements include a substantial research project involving critical research. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 316 Women in Modern Literature

In this course students will examine major American texts by women writers from the beginning of first wave feminism to the present. While most of the works studied will be narrative fiction, some non-fiction, drama, poetry, and memoirs are included. Themes addressed in this course include women's relation to work, religion, nature, marriage and family, their struggle for voting rights, equal treatment under the law, and as immigrants to America from different cultures. The focus of the course is the ways in which literary works both reflect and help to shape the history and culture of America. This includes examination of how particular genres, styles of writing, and literary techniques are utilized by the writers covered in this selective survey of American women writers. Note: Students cannot get credit for EGL 316 and 316W; EGL 316W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the English Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 317 Studies in Shakespeare

An analysis of Shakespearean plays, along with their sources, the early modern period in England, and traditional and contemporary critical commentary. Four or five plays will be studied each semester. Requirements will include examinations and analysis of plays. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 318 Advanced Creative Writing

An intensive workshop experience in which students are taught to recognize and appreciate excellence in the poetry and fiction of significant contemporary writers, and to produce polished works in these genres. Students will be required to keep a formal writer's journal and to participate in formal readings of their works, as well as provide pertinent critical evaluations of the writing of others. Prerequisite(s): EGL 216 Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 319 Modern Drama

This course provides an in-depth examination of representative plays of Modern Drama (late nineteenth century through the twentieth century), focusing on such literary movements as realism, expressionism, relativism, epic theater, theater of the absurd, and focusing on the historical and cultural context of the different literary movements and the representative plays. Requirements include a research project involving traditional and contemporary criticism. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 322 Leadership in Fact, Fiction and Film

Leadership in Fiction, Fact, and Film examines various fiction and non-fiction materials from a business perspective. Students will explore leadership, ethics/values, motivation, interpersonal skills, power/authority, communication, gender roles, empowerment, change, etc., as these concepts are demonstrated in these various works. Students will analyze the problems in the materials and apply them to modern-day corporate work situations, reflecting upon how these works are practical and functional to successful management tasks, responsibilities, and leadership. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 323 Major Authors in British Literature

An in-depth examination of major trends in British literature as reflected through the works of individual authors. One to three authors are studied in depth each semester. Requirements include a research project involving traditional and contemporary criticism. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 330 Classical Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides

This course introduces students to the Classical Greek Theater and its three great Athenian tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides through close readings of surviving texts in translation and through viewings of modern productions of these ancient theatrical works. Focusing on these playwrights' works both as art forms and as products of a specific historical society, the course will address the role this drama played in the lives, culture, and aesthetic sensibilities of the ancient Greeks as well as its role as a living art form in contemporary society. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 331 Death, Madness and Sex: The Victorians

Focusing on three of the predominant obsessions of Victorian society, this course will study the literary, artistic, and aesthetic explorations of these themes by authors such as Dickens, Stoker, Wilde, Tennyson, Rossetti, and Browning and artists such as Millais, Burne-Jones, Hunt, Leighton, Waterhouse, and Dadd to gain a comprehensive overview of this major literary, artistic, and cultural period. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

EGL 430 History of the English Language

An introduction to the development of the English language as a new universal language in the arts, sciences, and commerce. The course will treat such subjects as the ancestry of English, the history of English sounds and inflections, the sources of vocabulary, the making of words, meaning change, syntax and usage, dialectical variations, and introductory linguistic principles presenting language problems in the light of language history. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENV 101 Energy Sustainability and Environment

This is an introductory course to create and enhance the critical awareness of the student regarding various forms of energy, sustainability issues and the impact on the environment through unbridled use of energy in the present day context. A scientific and technological approach is used to discuss various topics. The knowledge base of this course is derived from certain natural sciences such as Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Eco-Science. The main topics of discussion are: Forms of energy, energy conservation, impact on the environment by the use of energy, forms of renewable energy and sustainability issues. The critical policy issues related to energy are also discussed. The course prepares the student to be a fully aware citizen on energy issues facing the community and the world. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 203 Sustainability in Architecture and Construction

This course gives an in-depth introduction and orientation to sustainability in built environment. Some of the areas this course will cover are: sustainable site, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, etc. Prerequisite(s): MTH 117or 129 and departmental approval required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 210 Energy Policy and Standards

This course gives an introduction to energy policy at various levels like the local governments, state and federal governments. Role of Public Service Commission, Inter and intra state energy markets, environmental laws as policy tools for energy generation and distribution are also topics of discussion. Influence of NGOs in shaping the energy policy is discussed. Topics like renewable portfolio standard, feed-in-tariff, distributed generation and its challenges etc. are included. Case studies involving local utilities will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENV 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 301 Energy in Electronics and Computer Systems

This course is intended to find ways of building future electronic information processing systems, with major improvements in energy efficiency. In particular new electronic and computer devices extending from low- power nanoelectronic devices, through circuit design, chip- scale architecture, short-range interconnects, long-range interconnect, networks, software, storage systems, servers, green data centers and supercomputers are considered. Prerequisite(s): ENV 210 and junior-level standing. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 305 Renewable Energy Systems I

This courses gives an overview of various renewable energy technologies like solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, bio fuels, fuel cells etc. The growth and potential of these technologies along with challenges faced by each of the technologies are discussed. Comparisons are made with conventional energy systems using fossil fuels. Prerequisite(s): ENV 210 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 310 Renewable Energy Systems II

This course is a follow up course of Renewable Energy Systems I. This course undertakes detailed study of some of renewable energy technologies like solar, wind energy systems. Design installation and maintenance aspects of renewable energy systems are covered. Cost benefits analysis of energy systems included. Prerequisite(s): ENV 305 and MTH 130 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENV 450 Capstone Project/Research

Capstone Project/Research course is a project course for Sustainability Energy and Environment Minor programs students. It is a course in which the student works on a self study mode under the supervision of a faculty member in the implementation of an approved design project proposal. At the end of the course students are required to provide a written report and make an oral presentation that addresses areas such as the design process implemented, product specifications, cost analysis, testing and/or computer simulation procedures used in the verification of results obtained as well as ethical and product liability issues addressed. Prerequisite(s): Approval of Advisor of the minor is required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

ESL 091 Beginning English as a Second Language

A beginning course for non-native speakers of English emphasizing basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Credits: 3 (3,0,0)

ESL 092 Intermediate English as a Second Language

A continuation of ESL 091. A course for the student who has attained a degree of fluency in speaking English but needs additional training in reading and writing skills. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ESL 093 Advanced English as a Second Language

A continuation of ESL 092. An advanced course for the non-native speaker of English who has already mastered basic skills. This course is designed to bring the student to the level of proficiency of a credit granting English composition course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

ETM 501 Engineering Quality Management and Reliability

This course covers the normal or Gaussian distribution, standard deviation, and confidence intervals including six-sigma. Advanced statistical concepts and methods are covered with an emphasis on implementation and practical applications. Monitoring and controlling product quality using statistical methods and parametric control charts is an integral part of this course. The principles of reliability engineering and their practical applications, including basic probability models for engineering components and systems failure, are presented with emphasis on practice oriented problem-solving class projects. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 503 Research Methods for Tech Mgmt

In this course the students will be introduced to current statistical analysis methods and modern data acquisition techniques by utilizing the most recent computer software applications. Introducing the students to advanced sensor technologies for measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity and flow rate through wireless data communication is an integral part of this course. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 510 Energy and Power Management Analysis

This course covers the identification and quantification of energy efficiency expressions for various energy sources. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and reduction methods and environmental management materials and techniques used in fossil fuel powered systems are discussed. Evaluation and comparison of the economic viability of both renewable and nonrenewable energy technologies, as well as monitoring, targeting, and forecasting (MT&F) their consumption, are integral elements of this course. Energy consumption management methods and techniques to help energy savings are also studied. Prerequisite(s): BUS 502 with a grade of C or better and Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 511 Nanotechnology Principles and Applications

This course provides students with an overview of nanotechnology, covering the fundamental science and the numerous emerging applications of this interdisciplinary new technology. Starting with a discussion of the scientific principles governing nanotechnology, the course then explores novel approaches to making and characterizing nanomaterials and nanosystems. New optical, electrical, physical, and chemical properties of materials at nanoscale that may have a significant beneficial impact are examined. Emerging applications spanning the areas of bioscience, electronics, energy, the environment and others are explored. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 513 Computer Applications in Engineering

This course is geared toward the conceptual design, manufacturing and maintenance of technological devices. Students are introduced to different aspects of computer aided design, including solid mechanics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), motion analysis and heat transfer. Relevant laboratory activities are conducted to acquaint students with constraint-based reasoning and design optimization. Concepts of computational power, parallel computing and cloud computing will be discussed as well. Laboratory course work furthers the application of theoretical concepts. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (2,2)

ETM 514 Engineering Analysis

This course examines the concept of engineering analysis. The course focuses on problems drawn from various engineering fields, such as heat transfer, fluid flow, forced oscillations, electric circuits, electric potential, and wave propagation. Topics include matrix algebra, matrix manipulation, application to systems of ordinary differential equations, and vector calculus. Complex numbers and complex analytic methods, matrix algebra packages such as MathCAD, Mathematica, or MATLAB are used. Definitions and basic properties of Legendre, Bessel, and other special functions are covered. Common problems in partial differential equations and solution by separation of variables, Eigen function expansions, Fourier integral, Laplace transform, and Fourier transform also are discussed. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 520 Control Systems Management

This course covers the principles and applications of time invariant linear control systems. Examples are drawn from electromechanical systems, sensors and actuators, electronic systems, active filters, robotics and programmable logic control systems (PLC). Topics covered include: Laplace transform, transfer function, time and frequency domain representations; block diagrams and signal flow graphs; state space representations; analysis and design of feedback control systems. Industry accepted software application such as MATLAB is extensively used throughout the course for projects and assignments. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 521 Semiconductor Devices and Integrated Circuits

This course focuses on the fundamental concepts and practical perspectives of the semiconductor devices that comprise modern electronic circuits. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of device operating principles, circuit analysis and design methods, and an overview of processing technology. Topics covered include: semiconductor materials and devices; p-n junctions; bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors; the MOS capacitor, MOSFET and CMOS; integrated circuits, amplifiers and frequency generators; digital integrated circuits; an overview of processing technology; novel nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 530 Residential Development Management

This course covers current homebuilding systems in the United States from design to construction. It includes an overview of the homebuilding industry, housing demand, management of the homebuilding process, the regulatory environment, housing design guidelines, development of contract documents, and the residential construction process. It also covers structural, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems. Prerequisite(s): BUS 502 with a grade of C or better and Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 531 Construction Cost Analysis and Advanced Estimating

This course covers the emerging techniques of construction cost analysis and advanced estimating. It includes estimating cycles, data collection and data sources for estimating, cost index, cost capacity factors, parameter cost, trade-off analysis, break-even analysis, depreciation, overhead, time value of money, rate-of-return analysis and forecasting. It also covers bid strategies, life cycle cost analysis, and cost-benefit ratio analysis. Prerequisite(s): BUS 502 with a grade of C or better and Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 533 Heavy Construction Operation and Equipment

This course covers current heavy construction practice in the United States in terms of construction planning and optimum use of heavy equipment. It includes earthwork planning, equipment cost, geotechnical materials, machine specifications, trucks and hauling equipment management, aggregate production including concrete and asphalt, cranes, piles and pile driving equipment, and equipment for pumping water for job sites. The course includes ten laboratory experiments, two on planning earthwork, three on geotechnical materials, compaction, and stabilization, one on compressed air, two on aggregate production, and two on concrete production. Prerequisite(s): BUS 502 with a grade of C or better and Graduate Status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Corequisite(s): ETM 533L Credits: 3 (2,2)

ETM 623 Optical Communications

This course covers the principles of optical fiber communication systems and optical networks. Topics include optical fibers, propagation characteristics, attenuation and dispersion, optical sources such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers, passive components, optical receivers, PIN and avalanche photodiodes, optical amplifiers, and optical switches. Optical system design issues are discussed including power budget, bandwidth, Q-factor, and bit error ratio (BER). Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, nonlinear effects, and modulation techniques are also covered along with optical networks, topologies, and applications. Prerequisite(s): Graduate status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 631 Construction Contracts

This course covers details of construction contracts and related documents, which include contract documents, design phase documents, pre-bid documents, bid submission documents, forms of agreement, and documents supporting the agreement. This course also covers site condition clauses, red flag clauses, insurance contracts, and surety bonds, as well as documentation and record keeping requirements. In addition, labor agreements and joint venture agreements will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ETM 502 with a grade of C or higher, graduate status in ETM and permission of the graduate coordinator Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 670 Master's Project

This is a Capstone course for students who do not plan to take the thesis option. The course is designed as an independent study in which the student utilizes their knowledge in the field to evaluate a series of case studies. A complete oral and written presentation is required of each student detailing his/her work. In each case study the student must clearly demonstrate their ability to understand, analyze and solve technical and/or managerial problems by applying their knowledge gained through their course work. Students completing this course will not receive credit for BUS 670. Prerequisite(s): Completion of twenty-one (21) credits of required Core and Track Specific Courses in the ETM program and permission of graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ETM 671 Master’s Thesis

This is an independent study performed by the students to utilize their knowledge in engineering technology management. This practice-oriented work contributes to the enhancement of productivity, the improvement of quality, and the achievement of an industry’s cost effectiveness. The master’s thesis draws on students’ individual interests, stimulating their critical thinking, and sharpening their problem-solving abilities. A literature survey, analysis, discussion, and conclusions are documented in the thesis under the direction of a faculty mentor and presented by the student at the completion of the work to demonstrate his/her professional competency in their field of study. Students completing this course will not receive credit for BUS 671. Prerequisite(s): Completion of twenty-one (21) credits of required Core and Track Specific Courses in the ETM program and permission of graduate coordinator. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRENCH

FRE 101 French I (Elementary)

A beginning course in French emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRE 102 French II (Elementary)

A continuation of French 101 emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s): 2 or 3 years of high school French or FRE 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRE 203 French III (Intermediate)

A continuation of FRE 102 for students who have had 3 or 4 years of high school French. This intermediate course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. A literary and cultural reader will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): required or 2 or 3 years of high school French. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRE 204 French IV (Intermediate)

For those students who have taken FRE 203 or four or more years of high school French. This course emphasizes structural review, intensified practice in oral expression with increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. Continued attention will be given to contemporary French culture. Selections from French authors will be read. Prerequisite(s): Approval of this department chair or FRE 203 Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRE 301 French V (Advanced)

An advanced conversation/composition course with intensive practice in oral and written French. Prepared discussions and writing assignments on selected cultural historical and literary topics. Prerequisite(s): Approval of this department chair or FRE 204. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRE 302 French VI (Advanced)

A continuation of French V Advanced with intensive practice in oral and written French. Prepared discussions and writing assignments on selected cultural, historical and literary topics. Prerequisite(s): Approval of this department chair or FRE 204. Credits: 3 (3,0)

FRESHMAN EXPERIENCE

FRX 101 The Freshman Experience

This course will enhance successful adaptation to college life. Topics relate to the academic, social, economic, health, and interactional factors that influence collegiate success. Enrollment is limited to matriculated freshmen only. While this course is open to all students, priority is given to Liberal Arts students. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for RAM 101. Credits: 1 (1,0)

FRX 103 Career Planning for Freshmen

This course is designed to assist freshmen that are undecided about choosing a future career or major. The course emphasizes self-assessment, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, educational and vocational planning, and orientation to college and reality testing. A successful adaptation to college is an overall goal of the course. Credits: 2 (2,0)

GEOGRAPHY

GEO 110 Maps and Map Analysis

This course is an introduction to the study and design of map formats, symbology, coordinate systems, and how maps record the historical patterns of human behavior. The course will also examine maps as a tool to analyze human activity and societal development, and include important aspects of map data collection, processing, the Global Positioning System (GPS), quantitative mapping, and GIS-based mapmaking techniques. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 200 Research Methods in Geography

This course exposes students to the process of doing geographic research. Basic epistemological and ontological approaches will be reviewed through the use of readings on research methodologies and selected readings from the geography literature. Class discussion will focus on the identification of research problems, construction of hypotheses, and development of research design. The course will cover a variety of important contemporary geographic theories and will complete exercises to give students hands-on experience in completing qualitative and quantitative geographic research. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101, MTH 110 and Any 200-Level or Higher GEO course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 201 Physical Geography

This course introduces students to the study of the Earth as a system. We will cover the four major subsystems--the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere, and the biosphere--with a focus on the patterns and processes that shape the planet. The goal of the course is to provide students with a clear understanding of the complex and changing processes associated with physical geography, especially those which are important for solving environmental and economic problems associated with air, water, soil, flora, fauna, and other aspects of the natural world. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 211 The World and Its Peoples

This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of cultures and societies of the contemporary world, as well as an introduction to world geography and how it has shaped major developments in global history. Critical readings of recent ethnography will be used to examine themes such as ethnicity and migration, rural life and traditionalism, and family and kinship. Students will also be familiarized with the growth of cities, demographic changes, the development of a leisure culture, and attitudes towards work as we survey the major world regions (Southern Asia, the Pacific Rim, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, the Americas, Europe, and Oceania). Furthermore, we will examine the interaction between humans and their physical environment, interrogate the role of language on national identity among peoples, and trace the evolution of world religions. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 221 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Geographic information systems (GIS) are computer systems designed for the creation, storage, retrieval, analysis, and visualization of spatial data. GIS is applied across fields as diverse as urban planning, environmental management, law enforcement, industrial location, and marketing, and for scientific research in many disciplines. This course is a hands-on course with a required lab period which will introduce students to foundational concepts and skills in working with spatial data, including finding and creating data, spatial analysis, and GIS-based map production. This course is a prerequisite for several upper-level GEO courses. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101, GEO 110 Corequisite(s): GEO 221L Credits: 4 (3,2)

GEO 222 Human Geography

This course provides an introduction to human geography in its multiple forms: social, cultural, environmental, urban, economic, and political. Students will explore human interactions through the lenses of community, culture, and society. While the focus will be on human populations, there will also be discussions of how interaction with nature and the environment shape relationships through an analysis of the so-called "Man-Land Tradition." Globalization, cultural diversity, and migration will serve as important themes throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level HIS or POL course Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 231 Europe and Its Peoples

This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of cultures and societies of contemporary Europe, as well as an introduction to the continent's geography and how its unique physical attributes shaped world history. Critical readings of recent ethnography will be used to examine themes such as ethnicity and migration, rural life and traditionalism, and family and kinship. Students will also be familiarized with the growth of cities, demographic changes, the development of a leisure culture, and attitudes towards work in Europe. Furthermore, we will examine the interaction between Europeans and their physical environment, interrogate the role of language on national identity among European peoples, and trace the evolution of religion from paganism to "Post-Christianity." We will also study the development of political culture on the continent and historical and contemporary projects to create a united Europe from the Pax Romana to the European Union. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 290 Topics in Geography

This course offers instruction in special content areas in the field of geography. Students will explore the linkages between physical and human geography, focusing on a particular topic, e.g., globalization, technology, youth, cities, trade and economic development, etc. Students should consult the department before registering for any Special Topics course. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS, POL, or GEO course Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 310 Introduction to Cartography with GIS

Maps can be powerful devices for communication, but also tools for exploration of relationships among social and physical processes manifesting in space. This course explores the history, science, and art of cartography. Students will use geographic information systems software to make reference and thematic maps. Students will apply principles of cartography, including the use of color, typography, and visual balance, to create maps which are informative, aesthetically pleasing, and ultimately convincing. Prerequisite(s): GEO 221 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 315 Statistics for Geographers

This course will cover statistical techniques for the analysis of spatial data, including spatial cluster detection, factor analysis, ANOVA, and multivariate regression. Special attention will be paid to spatial sampling and spatial autocorrelation. Students will complete computer exercises using statistical software. In addition to standard data visualization techniques (boxplots, histograms, scatterplots), students will learn how to create basic statistical maps for geovisualization. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 321 Geographic Information and Spatial Analysis

This upper-level course integrates geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial data analysis, with a focus on quantitative and qualitative methods, procedures for research design, and interpretation of findings. Topics include identification of spatial patterns, hypothesis testing, effective use of statistics, and data correlation. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110, GEO 221 or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 322 Cultural Geography

This course takes a critical approach to the study of human-environment interactions, focusing on how various cultural products and norms (as well as differences across cultures) shape our views about each other and the world around us. Students will be introduced to the comparatively new sub-discipline of cultural geography and interrogate the “cultural turn” in the field of geography. Students will engage the complex relationship between the “self” and the “other,” addressing the topics of power, economy, race, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and nationalism. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS, POL or GEO course Credit:3 (3,0)

GEO 323 Urban Geography

This course will trace the historical development of the city from its humble beginnings to its current form and beyond. We will explore the impact of environmental, economic, demographic, sociological, cultural, technological and political forces on the development of the world’s urban centers. This course will also explore the effects that urbanization and urbanism has on the lives of the world’s citizens and how cities are shaping the future of mankind. In addition to a theoretical treatment of the city, we will also take an in-depth look at the world’s great metropolises. By focusing on representative urban centers in different world regions, students will gain insight into the commonalities and differences of cities around the globe. Class discussions will be supported by lectures on the development of urban centers in the United States. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS, POL, or GEO course Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 324 Remote Sensing for GIS

This course, including its required lab component, will explore some of the ways in which remote sensing systems provide geospatial information that is relevant, accurate, timely, accessible, available in an appropriate format, and cost-effective. Recent developments in Earth observation such as imaging radar, LiDAR and hyperspectral sensors are increasing the wealth of information that can be generated from remotely sensed data sources. As a consequence numerous new GIS applications that rely on advanced remotely sensed data sources have emerged at local, regional and global scales. Course will cover topics including; remote sensing principles, image acquisition, image analysis and GIS/Remote Sensing Applications. Prerequisite(s): (MTH 110 or MTH 116 or MTH 117 or MTH129) and GEO 221 or permission of the department chair Credits: 4 (3,3)

GEO 330 Environmental Interactions

This course explores important environmental issues in sustainability facing society today. Topics to focus around understanding the changing spatial relationships between people and their environments, the causes and consequences of environmental degradation, strategies for building a more sustainable world, and the methods and approaches that scholars have used to understand human-environment interactions. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-Level Social Science Course Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 390 Special Topics in Geography

This upper-level course offers advanced instruction in special content areas in the field of geography. Students will explore a particular topic, theme, or sub-discipline, e.g., quantitative methods, climate change, race and ethnicity, etc. Students should consult the department before registering for any Special Topics course. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level or higher HIS, POL or GEO course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 400 Senior Seminar in GIS

Students integrate their knowledge of human and physical geography, as well as geographic techniques, to propose solutions to real-world problems. Students gain experience in working in small groups and in written and oral presentation of project results, and will be evaluated with respect to the skills acquired in their degree program. Topics may include, but are not limited to, issues such as sustainable development in rural communities, global and regional food and energy distribution, quantifying and analyzing global or regional indicators of environmental and/or societal trends. Prerequisite(s): Senior status and any 300 level GEO course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GEO 401 Internship in GIS

This internship course will provide students the opportunity to gain hands on experience and knowledge with using geospatial technologies. This internship consists of a structured on and/or off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is related to the student’s major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research under the guidance of geography faculty and the entity providing the internship opportunity. At the end of the internship the student should have more of the necessary skills to help translate their chosen degree into a job, as well as a better understanding of how this degree relates to society. Prerequisite(s): Approval by Program Director OR Student’s Dept. Chair Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

GERMAN

GER 111 German I (Elementary)

A beginning course in German emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GER 112 German II (Elementary)

A continuation of German 111 emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s): 2 or 3 years of high school German or GER 111. Credits: 3 (3,0)

GER 213 German III (Intermediate)

A continuation of GER 112 for students who have had 3 or 4 years of high school German. This course emphasizes the development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. A literary and cultural reader will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): GER 112 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GER 214 German IV (Intermediate)

For those students who have taken GER 213 or four or more years of high school German. This course emphasizes structural review, intensified practice in oral expression with increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. Continued attention will be given to contemporary German culture. Selections from German authors will be read. Prerequisite(s): GER 213 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GER 301 German V (Advanced)

A course in German which introduces the student who has completed the four basic skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) to the German language of everyday business. The course gives an insight into united Germany's place in the world market. The topics are general enough to be of interest to most intermediate and advanced students, but at the same time offer preparation for the business minded student. Prerequisite(s): GER 214 Credits: 3 (3,0)

GER 302 German VI (Advanced)

A continuation of German V Advanced. Prerequisite(s): GER 301 Credits: 3 (3,0)

COMPUTING GRAPHICS

GPH 103 Technical Drafting

This is a traditional manual drafting course including orthographic projection, dimensioning, auxiliary projection and pictorial representation. Emphasis will be placed on drafting techniques including lettering, line quality, accuracy and appearance. Credits: 1 (0,3)

GPH 104 Introduction to Computer Graphics

This is a laboratory course to provide basic understanding and skills in the College's computer graphics CAD software. Students will learn how to run Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) software on PC's to produce mechanical drawings. They will be taught commands and concepts, and develop the skills required. Some of the topics covered include: setup, drawing, erasing, saving, printing, lines, geometric construction, object snap, text, editing and basic dimensioning. Credits: 1 (0,2)

HISTORY

HIS 114 Western Civilization I

A brief survey from ancient Greece and Rome up to 1789, followed by extensive treatment of the ascendancy of early modern Western civilization, together with its social, economic, and political revolutions, from 1500 through the Napoleonic era. NOTE: Students completing HIS 114 and HIS 115 may not receive credit for HIS 126. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 115 Western Civilization II

Traces the spread of Western civilization and the development of the modern world by examining the impact of the forces of romanticism, nationalism, industrialism, and intellectual creativity. NOTE: Students completing HIS 114 and HIS 115 may not receive credit for HIS 126. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 117 World Civilization I

A survey of major non-Western civilizations and their interaction with one another, as well as with the European West from antiquity through the Early Modern Period. The course will explore ancient polytheistic traditions, the foundations of major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam), and the rise of Christianity as a global faith. It will also address non-Western social, political, and economic systems in East Asia, South Asia, the Muslim World, Sub-Saharan Africa, and pre-Columbian America. Note: Students completing HIS 117 and HIS 118 may not receive credit for HIS 126. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 118 World Civilization II

A survey of the developing world and its interaction with the West since 1700, the course will explore the chaotic effects of the non-Western world's interaction with European imperial powers, the United States, and Soviet Union, focusing on social, economic, cultural, and political change in East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. The major themes of the course will center on imperialism, nationalism, modernization, the World Wars, and the Cold War. Note: Students completing HIS 117 and HIS 118 may not receive credit for HIS 126. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 121 U.S. History to Reconstruction

A discussion of the development of the United States from its English origins through Reconstruction, this course shows how a new civilization arose out of revolution, independence, new governmental institutions, and equalitarianism, and illustrating the results of the westward movement, and the causes and consequences of the Civil War. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HIS 125. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 122 U.S. History Since Reconstruction

A historical evaluation of American society, assessing Reconstruction, immigration, the nature of imperialism, progressivism, World War I and II, the Cold War, and contemporary American life. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HIS 125. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 200 Introduction to Historical Methods

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to historical methods, including how to research historical events, evaluate sources, properly use citations, produce bibliographies, and write about history. The course also focuses on the teaching of history, including effective pedagogical methodologies, the debate over "political correctness," the use of primary sources, employing technology and visual media in the classroom, and how to address issues such as plagiarism. The course may also include an optional historiography component (at the discretion of the instructor), which will focus on a particular historical period and/or geographic region, with the aim of exposing students to breadth and width of historical approaches. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 210 America and the World

This course examines the changing role of the United States in global affairs and its consequences for American society from 1860 to the present. During this period, the US went from an isolated nation to a world power. This class explores such topics as late 19th-century imperialism, American involvement in World War I and II, isolationism and global depression, national security policy and strategy during the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, nuclear proliferation, the War on Terrorism and the balance of power in the 21st century. In addition, this course focuses on world historical themes such as industrialization, population growth, suburbanization and urbanization, and the exploitation of natural resources, and in the process, interrogates within a national and international context the idea of American exceptionalism, the origins and impact of US hegemony, and the use of national histories and ideologies. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 212 Modern World

Analyzes the impact of technology on the major political movements and governmental systems of the modern world since 1900. The course will examine the effects of technology on war, culture, ideology and the future. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 213 Peoples and Cultures of Asia

A study of the peoples, cultures, religions, customs and philosophies of India, China, Japan, and southeast Asia, and discussion of the social and political effects of Mongol, Muslim, and Occidental contacts with the Orient. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 214 East Asia and the World

This course examines modern East Asian history and culture as well as the multifaceted interactions between the region and the world in the global age. Focusing on the historical transformation of China, Japan, and Korea since 1200, this course investigates different aspects of political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual revolution and transformation. The main topics include the following: cultural encounters between the East and West, imperialism (within the region and imposed from abroad), modernity and political transformations, Japanese territorial aggression and the Pacific War, postwar societal and economic change, the growth of the metropolis, Asian diasporas, and the unique qualities of East Asian modernities. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 215 The World of Islam

An examination of the birth and development of Islam from its beginning to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the inter-connection of Islam with Judaism and Christianity and the common basis of monotheism. Topics to be discussed include the Ottoman and Mogul Empires, trade and commerce, urbanization, intellectual movements and class formation in the Islamic world. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 216 History of Central Asia: From Genghis to Borat

A study of the history, peoples, cultures, religions, customs, and contemporary politics of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan), as well as the relationship between the region and its neighbors China, Russia, Turkey, and Iran. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 217 From Constantine to Columbus: Western Civilization in the Middle Ages

This course will examine the development of the major cultural, social, and political movements and institutions of Western Civilization in the period before Columbus. Through both lecture and discussion formats, students will examine the preservation of Greek and Roman learning; Christian civilization and its relation with Islamic culture; the rise of cities, international trade and national capitalism; European learning and the emergence of the university; the rise of the nation-state and the origins of secularism. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify the roots and explain the development of cultural, social, and political institutions that are unique to the Western world. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 219 Topics in History

A treatment of diverse topics, chosen by the Department of History, Economics, and Politics for their long-term impact and current historical importance. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 220 Ethnic and Immigration History

An analysis of immigration in American life, employing studies of demography, colonial settlement, and mass migrations, and describing the ordeal of adjustment, nativism, immigration policy, cultural pluralism, and the shifting ethnic pattern. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 222 Women in U.S. History

In what ways is the history of America a gendered history? Emphasizing the diversity of American women, the course situates the ways women have both shaped and been shaped by American society within the broader context of US history since 1865. Topics for investigation include the way different groups of women have experienced American sectionalism, the industrial revolution, urbanization, immigration, war, economic depression, cultural transformations and political change. We will be looking at both unity and diversity in American society, including the conflicts between women and a society based on patriarchy. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 233 Comparative Religions and Cultures

A survey of religions of the East and the region of the Mediterranean, with discussion of their impact on the lives of individuals, and on cultures and other societies through the interrelationship of value systems. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 240 History of Public Health Care and Medicine

An examination of the historical development of health and medical care in societies, both Western and non-Western, from ancient times to contemporary America. An emphasis on scientific and technological advancement, care of the ill, treatment of disease, and training of health care practitioners. Discussion of the values of each historical period and the relationships between social values, ethics, and prescribed health care. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 243 Science and the West: From Newton to Present

This course traces the development of western society from the 16th century to present, focusing specifically on how scientific and technological developments have shaped modern western society and culture. The course proceeds chronologically from the scientific revolution of the 16th century to the present atomic age. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 270 Genocide in the Twentieth Century

The course explores the history of ethnic, religious, and other forms of genocide during the twentieth century. The topics covered will include the Armenian massacres of 1915-1923, the Jewish Holocaust (Shoah), and the Roma Porajmos, as well more recent examples of genocide, including events in Cambodia, Bosnia, and Rwanda. Students will also critically assess other claims of genocide in world history, focusing on related issues such as ethnic cleansing, forced population transfers, etc. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 280 Caribbean History

This course explores the Caribbean Basin and places it in the historical context of the larger Atlantic World. The course begins with the arrival of Columbus in the Caribbean Islands and the conquest of the region by Spain. Subsequently, the course will explore the development of the sugar industry, the introduction of African slaves, and the arrival of other European powers in the region, including the French, English and Dutch. Additionally, this course will trace the development of Caribbean nations during the 19th century and their subsequent struggles for economic and political survival. The primary focus of the course will be on the larger islands of Cuba, Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic), Jamaica, Cuba, and Puerto Rico, with a brief overview of the Lesser Antilles. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 281 Modern Latin America

This course covers the history of Latin America from the early 1800s until the early 2000s, beginning with the immediate causes and antecedents of the Independence Wars. Subsequent topics include: political and social conflicts in the post-independence period; the rise of the United States as an important economic and political player in the 19th century; industrialization and modernization of Latin America including participation of the region in the war effort during World War II. The course concludes with the political repercussions of the Cold War in the region, and its connection to the neoliberal economic policies established in the 1990s and early 2000s. Special attention will be paid to gender, class, race, and ethnicity, and their influence in the sociopolitical developments of Latin America. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 302 Civil War and Reconstruction

This course examines the primary themes of the Civil War and Reconstruction era through secondary and primary texts within a discussion format. Students are introduced to the origins of the sectional conflict during the antebellum period, the relevance of slavery to the conflict, the formation of southern nationalism and secession, the social, political and economic dimensions of the war effort, emancipation, Reconstruction and Redemption, and the legacy of the war. Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 or HIS 125. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 305 Culture and Technology in England

This course is a multidisciplinary examination of the ways in which technology affected everyday life during the Industrial Revolution in England. Covering the years 1750 to 1880, it examines the changes taking place in technology during the period; how these changes ultimately affected the workplace, the home, and the community and how novelists of the period felt about these changes. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HUM 305, SOC 305, or IDP 305. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 and One social science course or HIS 114 and HIS 115. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 306 Transformation of America

A detailed study of the technological, economic, social, political, ideological and cultural transition of America from a rural, agrarian republic to a complex, industrialized, urban nation in the period from 1820 - 1920. This interdisciplinary course uses primary and secondary material to examine the effect of technology and urbanization on American life. A multi-cultural and cross-gender perspective will provide focus. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for EGL 306 or IDP 306. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 307 Germany in the Modern Age

Examines the scientific, technological, political, and cultural development of modern Germany since the Industrial Revolution. Special emphasis to be placed on the interaction of technological developments and their impact on culture, society, and politics from 1815 to the present. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 310 Technology and Society Russia-1917-Present

This course examines the connections between industrialization, culture, society, and politics in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia. Topics of discussion include the development of Russian communism, collectivization, the Cold War, ethnicity and religion, and post-Soviet politics and culture. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 311 China Since 1840

This course is a survey of the major political, social, intellectual, and cultural developments in China from the First Opium War to the present. Using primary texts (historical documents) and other scholarly resources, this course investigates different aspects of China’s various “revolutions” (political, social, cultural, and intellectual). The main topics include the encounter between East and West, the transition from an empire to a nation-state, the New Culture Movement, as well as the making of a new vernacular language, the growth of the metropolis, and the various facets of Chinese modernity. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 312 Latin American Popular Culture in the 20th Century

This course will explore mass mediated popular culture developed in Latin America within the last century. Cultural industries (i.e. music, television, etc.) are a significant export to the international market from countries like Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina. The class will discuss the different definitions of popular culture and analyze the impact of mass media on such definitions. The class will also examine a variety of cultural productions, including music (i.e. tango, salsa, and reggaeton), cinema, comic books, and telenovelas (Latin American soap operas). Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 315 Imperialism: A Modern History

The rise and fall of empires is fundamental to world history. Beginning with the First Opium War and concluding with East Timor’s independence from Portugal, this course explores how Europe’s maritime empires (Britain, France, Spain, Netherlands, etc.) and continental imperial states (Russia, Austria, and Turkey) acquired, maintained, and ultimately lost their vast colonial possessions in the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Using cross-disciplinary approaches, the connections between imperialism and commercial, technological, and industrial advancement will be explored through analysis of various forms of imperialism, including political, economic, and cultural, as well as its discourses and practices. Related issues such as power, hegemony, capitalism, consumerism, and decolonization will also be examined. The course content may focus on a particular area of the globe (e.g., East Asia, the Middle East, or Latin America) or a particular theme associated with imperialism (e.g., gender, migration, identity, etc.). Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 317 Irish History

The study of Irish history with a view toward understanding the development of the Irish nation focused upon matters political, legal, religious, and military in nature. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 318 Israel: A History of the Jewish State

This course provides a comprehensive history of the modern state of Israel. Beginning with Zionism and the settlement of Jews in Ottoman Palestine, we will explore the complex and troubled history of the country up to the present day. Special focus will be placed on the Palestinian issue, the Arab-Israeli conflict, terrorism and counterterrorism, and geopolitics in the Middle East. In addition to the history and politics, we will also explore culture, society, and economics in contemporary Israel. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 319 Special Topics in History

A treatment of diverse topics, chose by the department for their current historical import. The course will require extensive reading and writing. Depending on the topic, travel students should check with the department before registering for this course. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 320 Europe Since the Industrial Revolution

This course examines European history from the period of the Industrial Revolution to the present. Special focus will be placed on how scientific and technological developments impacted politics, society, and culture in Europe and the West more generally. The histories of individual European nation-states will be discussed, as well as major revolutions, periods of intense social change, and the two world wars. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 321 America and the World

This course examines the changing role of the United States in global affairs and its consequences for American society from 1860 to the present. During this period, the US went from an isolated nation to a world power. This class explores such topics as late 19th-century imperialism, American involvement in World War I and II, isolationism and global depression, national security policy and strategy during the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, nuclear proliferation, the War on Terrorism and the balance of power in the 21st century. In addition, this course focuses on world historical themes such as industrialization, population growth, suburbanization and urbanization, and the exploitation of natural resources, and in the process, interrogates within a national and international context the idea of American exceptionalism, the origins and impact of US hegemony, and the use of national histories and ideologies. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 322 American History through Film

This history course explores the relationship between historical interpretation and representation through feature films and historical writing. Students analyze key themes, myths, and issues in the American experience by analyzing and contrasting cinematic constructions with written historical texts. The themes studied in this class include the frontier West and rugged individualism, the immigrant experience, the American Dream and assimilation cultural conflict and conquest, war and democratic freedom technological progress and morality, youth and rebellion, power and personality, race and equality, and social change, class and intolerance. Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 or HIS 122 or HIS 125 or Approval of department Chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 323 Contemporary America

Depicts America's responses to the Cold War, violence, and military aggression, the emergence of Third World countries, the economic and political impact of rising expectations, the problems of the city and the suburbs, and the quest for social justice. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 324 Roots of Black Americans

This course examines the primary themes and topics in African-American History from 1600 to the present. It will analyze the roles of African-America's past by emphasizing the connections between social, political, and economic patterns, trends, and developments, and as such, will integrate and situate African-American History into the larger exploration of the history of the nation. The course will focus on the forced migration of Africans during the middle passage, the development of racial slavery, the origins and evolution of racism, the emergence of plantation society, the implications of the American revolution for slavery and equality, the formation of the abolitionist movement and the proslavery defense, antebellum slave culture and consciousness, the Civil War and emancipation, reconstruction the legalization of segregation, institutional resistance and African-American community, the new deal and political realignment, the civil rights movement and its fragmentation. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher course in HIS Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 325 America and the Vietnam War

An examination of American involvement in the Vietnam conflict from its origins in the Cold War to its legacies today. It will adopt a multidisciplinary approach and use a variety of mediums, integrating history, literature, and film and utilizing lectures, guest speakers, and discussions. Particular attention will be given to cultural origins and effects of the War. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher course in HIS Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 330 Oral History

What happens to our memories after we are gone? Oral history is one way to preserve memories. Oral histories are one of the most important tools in the historian’s trade. Sometimes an oral history is the only record we have of an event or an entire people, which means the oral historian has a special responsibility. This is a hands-on course, which requires that students successfully complete an online Human Research Participants Training program and learn about theories of memory as they prepare for, conduct, and preserve an oral interview. Prerequsitie(s): Junior Status Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 331 History of New York State

This course will examine the development of New York State from its Native American, Dutch, and British colonial origins until today. The course provides an overview and in- depth discussion of the state's history and evolution as part of the United States, its founding ideas and institutions, and how it emerged as the Empire State we know today. In particular, the course will examine the following themes: political parties, ideology, and conflict; race, ethnicity and immigration; the economy, labor, and entrepreneurship; war and society. Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 or HIS 122 or HIS 125 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 332 American Military History

American Military History is a multidimensional survey of the evolution of American Military organization, traditions methods from the colonial era to the onset of asymmetrical warfare in the Middle East. The course will present and analyze the key military events, leaders and strategists, including their influence on, and influence by, political considerations, global interests, public opinion as well as technological and economic factors. Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 or HIS 122 or HIS 125 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 333 The 1960's in America

This course examines the people, events and issues of the era through a thematic approach within a larger chronological framework and focuses on domestic social, cultural and political developments. Because the 1960s contained so many seemingly disparate topics and issues, the class will emphasize the connections between and across a broad variety of subjects and disciplines. Topics include the seeds of change during the 1950's; the triumph and breakdown of postwar liberalism; insurgent political and social movements, including the civil rights movement, feminism, antiwar protest, and the New Left; the counterculture; the sexual revolution; drug culture; technology; music; and the legacy of the Sixties. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 334 The History of New York City

This course examines the origins of New York City as a small Dutch settlement known as New Amsterdam through its incarnation as a mercantile British colony, its growth as a commercial and later industrial metropolis, its emergence as a center of capital and modernity, and its ascendancy along with its decline and subsequent resurgence as a center of global capitalism during the 20th and 21st centuries. The course focuses on the social history of New York City, though it explores cultural, political, technological and economic developments and issues that defined its evolution. As such, the course topics include the influences of ethnicity and race on the city, the definitions, contestations and uses of social spaces, the social lives and roles of upper, middle and lower classes, the lore and intrigue of the larger than life personalities and infamous incidents in shaping the City's history, and the legendary conflicts over urban planning, use and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 335 Gender and Technology in Historical Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the connections between gender roles and technology from comparative and historical perspectives. Studying the past in this way sheds light on key global issues today. How does technology shape feminine and masculine identities in the developed world? What happens to preconceived notions of gender relations and gender identities when the developed world and developing world come into contact? This course focuses on the interaction between technology and gender in the age of globalization and is intended to be interdisciplinary and may begin with a dash of sociology or anthropology, dissecting gender roles in our world today. It will also examine the historical connections between gender roles and technology specifically in the United States. At the discretion of the instructor, topics to investigate may include the function of gender and technology in European exploration, European imperialism, and U.S. expansion. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 341 Terrorism and the Modern World

This course traces the global impact of terror and terrorism since the first use of the term in 1795. Much of the course focuses on the use of political violence by non-state actors and revolutionary organizations operating both at a domestic and international level. We will compare and contrast the various "waves" of terror which have gripped the globe since the late 1800s and analyze the similarities and differences between groups such as the IRA, the Ku Klux Klan, and al Qaeda. We will also explore state-based terror, specifically the use of fear, surveillance, and the secret police by various regimes in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of media as an enabler of terrorism and terrorists will also be an important theme throughout the semester. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course or EGL 102. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 342 The History of Television

Despite the recent emergence of new communication technologies, television arguably remains the most powerful and important form of communication today--a medium that influences and shapes our views of ourselves and our outlooks on the world. Television helps to bind us together through shared cultural distortions of our social experiences and relations and yet divides us over its short- and- long-term effects, both national and global. This course explores American culture during the post World War II period through an analysis of the history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital media. It examines television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of analytical approaches. The course topics include the structure, economics and dynamics of the television industry, the role of television within American democracy, the variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 343 Cinema and the City in East Asia

This is an interdisciplinary, seminar-style course that focuses on the history, culture, society, and everyday life in major urban centers in East Asia as depicted in film. This course draws on movies set in major cities, including Tokyo, Kyoto, Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Seoul. This course will address such topics as metropolis and modernity, women and gender, war and trauma, love and family relationships, modern and contemporary media, urban and rural contrasts, as well as perceptions of time, identity, and globalization. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 351 The Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey of key aspects of the history of the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. In the first section of the class, we will explore the history of Turkic nomads, Byzantium, the Muslim Levant, and the formation of the empire. In subsequent modules, the focus will be on Ottoman political and commercial development, the conquest of the Balkans, the Sublime Porte's interaction with world powers, imperial overreach, and faith and identity in the multinational Ottoman state. In the last part of the course, we will explore the radical changes wrought by the rise of the Young Turks and the effects of the Great War (including the Armenian Massacres), moving on to a discussion of Kemalism and contemporary Turkey. Prerequisite(s): One Western Civilization course or equivalent or EGL 102. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 360 Madness in the Modern Age

What is insanity? How do societies define pathology? How have categories such as gender, race, class, and sexuality shaped views of mental health? Answering these questions highlights why psychiatry is one of the most complex fields of medicine today. This course will explore the answers to these questions by examining the history of madness. By focusing on the evolving ways historians have written on the subject of madness, students will learn about issues of interpretation in the production of knowledge. Topics to be covered include madness in antiquity, the asylum movement, early efforts to identify mental illnesses as biochemical disorders, the origins of psychoanalysis, and the development of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HIS 365 Public History

Why do so many Americans claim to hate history as a subject, yet spend their weekends visiting historic sites, watching historical films, performing genealogical research, or otherwise engaging with the past? This course will explore this question by introducing students to the field of public history. We will study the many ways that history is put to work in the world outside of the classroom. Topics to be covered include oral history, museum studies, walking tours, documentary films, websites, and social media. Prerequisite(s): Any 100- level or higher history course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HORTICULTURE

HOR 100 Introduction to Plant Science

Success in advanced horticulture study requires an understanding of biological processes that operate at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels along with an appreciation for concepts of evolution and ecology. Topics addressed from the perspective of horticulture via lecture and laboratory participation include cell structure and metabolic activities such as respiration and photosynthesis. Students will be introduced to plant life cycles, basic chemistry, plant structure and physiology. Principles of genetics such as probability and Mendelian theory are also explored. Note: For students in the BS program this course serves as a prerequisite for BIO 192 Botany. Needs lab statement. Corequisite(s): HOR 100L Credits: 4 (3,2)

HOR 103 Herbaceous Plants I

Lecture and field study of the nomenclature, identification, ornamental attributes, cultural requirements and horticultural uses of annuals, summer display plants treated as annuals, spring and summer flowering bulbous plants used in gardens. Corequisite(s): HOR 103L (2,2) Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 105 Landscape Gardening

Classroom studies in landscape appreciation. The elements and principles of art for creative design with application in lettering, freehand, and perspective drawing. Field application in garden improvement and operation. Credits: 3 (1,6)

HOR 106 Nursery Management

An introductory nursery course in the techniques and practices used in the commercial production of herbaceous perennials, ground covers, deciduous shrubs and trees, conifers, and broadleaved evergreens. Greenhouse and nursery procedures and practices. Credits: 3 (1,6)

HOR 110 Horticulture I

Instruction, orientation and field experience in the various phases of horticulture. Each week the explanation and demonstration of a new subject precedes the assignment to duties/ A rounded experience is the objective. Tools, techniques, and standards of workmanship are taught. Corequisite(s): HOR 110L Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 111 Horticulture II-Growth and Development of Cultivated Plants

The performance of landscape plants is influenced by myriad internal and external factors that may limit growth and survival. By understanding the scientific basis for these variables informed professionals can customize growth conditions to promote optimal yield. This course surveys the physiological processes that mitigate plant growth, senescence, dormancy, flowering and propagation. Lab exercises offer an interactive opportunity to investigate phenomena such as dormancy and photoperiod through experimentation, data collection and interpretation. The development of practical horticultural skills is also stressed. Corequisite(s): HOR111L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 112 Soils: The Foundation of Life

Soils serve as the foundation for production in natural ecosystems and human systems. This exploration of soils addresses their geologic formation and properties (physical, chemical and biological). Special attention is given to the focused manipulation of soils to achieve optimum plant performance in landscape situations. Through classroom lecture and investigative laboratory exercises students will develop an appreciation for soil as a dynamic living system with broad implications for agriculture and general society. Corequisite(s): HOR 112L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 115 Home Landscaping and Maintenance

A survey course designed for the homeowner who is interested in landscaping a home and learning how to maintain plant material. Topics covered include basic design principles, foundation plantings, and the use of flowers in the design; as well as the planting, pruning, fertilizing, and care of plant material used in the design. Credits: 2 (2,0)

HOR 116 Residential Horticulture and Landscape Design

A survey course designed as an elective for non-horticulture majors who are interested in landscaping their homes and learning how to maintain plant materials. Topics covered include basic design principles, foundation plantings, and the use of flowers in the design; as well as the planting, pruning and care of plant material used in the design. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 119 Insects and Diseases of Lawns and Gardens

The nature of insect and disease organisms will be studied. Pest control regulations, insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and equipment are discussed, including identification of common insects and disease of lawns, garden flowers, trees, and shrubs; also weeds and their control. Fruit and vegetable pests are also covered. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 127 Horticultural Seminar

This course provides an overview of the industry, and major areas of development; it will provide an opportunity for students to hear from representatives of the industry. Students will be provided with the basis for an assessment of future career opportunities as well as the opportunity to evaluate their individual needs for continuing education. Credits: 1 (1,0)

HOR 129 Landscape Drafting

The introduction to landscape drafting; including the use of drafting equipment, drawing of landscape symbols, lettering techniques, and perspective drawing. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 131 Landscape Drafting I

This course introduces students to essential drafting techniques and design fundamentals. The student develops graphic skills in landscape drafting and layout by utilizing drafting instruments to produce landscape plans. Students visualize space by learning plan view, orthographic projection, section/elevation design and are introduced to perspective design techniques. Emphasis is placed upon representation, definition, and expression of landscape concepts. Through lectures, workshops and in-class exercises, students explore techniques in black-and-white media. The goal is to learn how to develop drawing skills so that students can present proposed garden designs to clients. Each student is required to produce and present a final set of drawings suitable for presentation to a client or inclusion in a portfolio. This course has a laboratory component (HOR131L). Corequisite(s): HOR 131L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 132 Horticulture Practice I

Application of classroom theory to practical situations in the field. Students are assigned to areas in the greenhouse, gardens, nursery, and plant collections to learn and practice the art and skills of gardening. Students are given supervision in the field by faculty and staff from the Horticulture Department. Credits: 1 (0,2)

HOR 133 Landscape Drafting II

This course continues the development of graphic skills introduced in Landscape Drafting I. Students discover how to visualize space by learning perspective design, orthographic projection and section elevation design. Prerequisite(s): HOR 131 Corequisite(s): HOR 133L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 157 Introductory Floriculture

This course provides an introduction to floriculture and includes basic floral design, preparation, and care and identification of indoor flowering and foliage plants. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 170 Landscape Graphics

This course is designed to introduce students to essential drafting techniques and design fundamentals. The student develops graphic skills in landscape drafting and layout by utilizing drafting instruments to produce landscape plans. Students visualize space by learning plan view, perspective design, orthographic projection and elevation/ section design. Emphasis is placed upon representation, definition, and expression of landscape concepts. Through lectures, workshops, and in-class exercises, students explore techniques in both black-and-white and color media. The goal is to learn how to develop drawing skills so that clients can more clearly understand proposed garden designs. Each student is required to produce and present a final set of drawing suitable for presentation to a client or inclusion in a portfolio. Corequisite(s): 170L (1,4) Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 171 Landscape Techniques

This course has two distinct components. During the first half of the course students are introduced to the studio techniques of landscape design including drawing techniques such as perspective design, orthographic projection, section/elevation design, and rendering techniques. In the second half of the course, students are taught the field skills required to install, maintain and improve gardens and landscapes. These techniques are practiced during the laboratory section. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for HOR 133. Prerequisite(s): HOR 131 Corequisite(s): HOR 171L Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 201 Arboriculture

This course introduces the theory and application of caring for ornamental trees. Students learn essential techniques including climbing, pruning, bracing, cabling, bark and cavity repair and fertilization. Demonstration techniques, pruning practices and tree climbing skills are also taught. Prerequisite(s): BIO 192 Corequisite(s): HOR 201L Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 203 Greenhouse Management I

A study of greenhouse structures used for commercial production of cut flower and pot plants crops. Various construction and maintenance techniques will be discussed, as well as greenhouse ventilation and cooling equipment. Practical application of greenhouse equipment will be discussed and applied to the production of crops. Corequisite(s): HOR 203L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 204 Herbaceous Plants II

Lecture and field study of the nomenclature, identification, ornamental attributes, cultural requirements and horticultural uses of hardy perennial plants used in gardens including ferns, ornamental grasses, wild flowers, and herbs. Naturalistic woodland and rock gardens are introduced as well as the principles to design perennial borders. Corequisite(s): HOR 204L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 205 Floral Design II- Advanced

This course will include instruction in contemporary and European arrangements, artistic party pieces, hi-style silk arrangements and all phases of wedding floral designs. Prerequisite(s): HOR 120 and HOR 121 Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 205 Advanced Floral Design

This course will include instruction in contemporary and European arrangements, artistic party pieces, hi-style silk arrangements and all phases of wedding floral designs. Prerequisite(s): HOR 120 and HOR 121 Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 207 Landscape Plans I

The course covers the theory and principles of applying landscape design skills for solving landscape problems. Students learn the design process from creating preliminary sketches to final presentation drawings including, plans, section elevations, freehand and perspective sketches. Prerequisite(s): HOR 133 Corequisite(s): HOR 270L Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 208 Nursery Production

This course explores commercial nursery stock production topics dealing with plant growth patterns and plant responses in relation to soils, water, fertility, planting techniques, spacing requirements and pruning. Additional topics covered include plant production cycles and rotations, and treatment for economy production. Emphasis will be placed on the commercial propagation of woody plants by sexual and asexual means. Credits: 4 (3,3)

HOR 209 Planting Plans I

The course emphasizes the various types of plans the landscape designer must know how to read and draw. Sight analysis, grading plans and planting designs will be covered in detail as they pertain to residential site projects. Additionally students will be shown how to incorporate illustrative visual media to accompany developed plans. Credits: 3 (1,6)

HOR 210 Horticulture Materials and the Environment

This course is intended to focus on various horticultural materials and practices that have an impact on the public and the environment. Discussion and classification of horticultural materials such as fertilizers, growth regulators, pesticides, etc., as well as their regulatory and safety measures will be explored throughout the course. Finally, alternative management practices which reduce the use of horticultural materials and cultural methods will be examined. The current computer software available in the library on various topics will also be utilized during the semester. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 211 Woody Plants I

The Woody Plants courses give a picture primarily of the woody plants grown in nurseries for landscape purposes, and secondly of those found in arboretums, woodlands, and fields of Northeastern United States. Emphasis is on identification, culture, uses, flowers, and fruits, and ecological relationships. Several of the evergreens, broad and narrow leaf, as well as some of the deciduous trees and shrubs will be covered in this first study. Corequisite(s): 211L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 212 Woody Plants II

A continuation of Woody Plants I covering additional evergreens, broad and narrow leaf, as well as deciduous plants, trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers. Corequisite(s): 212L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 213 Arboriculture II

Advanced theory, practice and field studies of the arboriculture industry, including care and pruning of fruit plants, diagnosis of tree ills, shade tree evaluation, and power equipment. Business practices and organization including management, record keeping, estimating, customer relations, ethics and standards. Prefaced by an overview of the arborist industry. Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 214 Horticulture and Turfgrass Equipment

A study of the types of powered equipment used by the industry. Small engines and power sources are studied. Emphasis is placed on selection maintenance and operation of this equipment. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 216 Greenhouse Management II

The study of florist crops, modern technical applications, and cultural requirements, as used in the production of cut flowers and pot plants in the floriculture industry. Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 218 Indoor Plants

A study of various plants that are suitable for indoor culture. Emphasis will be placed on identification, propagation, cultural requirements, ecological and aesthetic values. Corequisite(s): HOR 218L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 219 Landscape Construction

This course examines techniques and material selection for designing and building steps, walks, walls, fences and other landscape features and structures. Basic skills in landscape surveying will also be emphasized. Corequisite(s): HOR 219L Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 220 Landscape Plans II

The theory and principles of landscape design are applied to selected landscape problems. Projects comprise preliminary sketches and final presentations in plan, elevation and perspective forms. Students prepare contract documents: plans, specifications and estimates in relationship to comprehensive landscape planning. Prerequisite(s): HOR 207 Corequisite(s): HOR 220L Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 223 Floral Design I- Basics

This course is intended for majors and non-majors who seek to develop basic skills of floral design. Students will be given lectures on the selection, availability and use of various materials used in floristry. Additionally, exercises are designed to focus on developing artistic techniques for creating floral works that have personal and commercial value. The structure and mechanics of floral pieces as well as principles, patterns and elements of design are stressed. Topics include traditional arrangements, special occasion arrangements, holiday arrangements as well as wedding and sympathy work. Students are expected to learn and identify the major flowers used in the trade. They will become familiar with the seasonality and availability of floral crops. A separate materials fee applies to cover cost of flowers and supplies used within coursework. Corequisite(s): HOR 223L Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 226 Floral Design II – Advanced

This course allows students with basic floral design knowledge and skills to continue their growth in the field. Through lectures and extensive lab exercises students explore the availability, proper selection and usage of diverse floristry materials. Projects focus on creating designs that have personal aesthetic appeal and functional value for specific purposes such as parties, weddings, funerals, Romantic/English Garden themes, European styles and tropical arrangements. Emphasis is placed on construction at an advanced level both mechanically and artistically. Students work individually and on group projects. Proficiency with florist business skills such as retail orders, cost analysis, client relationships, management of personnel and delivery services is also stressed. Prerequisite(s): HOR 223 with a grade of D or higher Corequisite(s): HOR 226L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 227 Computer Landscape Graphic Design

The integrated graphics environment of the Macintosh computer combined with contemporary printing technology permits creation of sophisticated landscape graphics. Intended for the landscape design professional who needs an alternative method to present landscape plans or planting plans. This course covers the Macintosh hardware and software available to the landscape designer in order to maximize them to obtain professional results. Prerequisite(s): HOR 131 and HOR 133 Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 228 Current Horticultural Topics

Topics of current horticultural interest will be selected by the Horticulture Department and covered in depth. The topics to be covered will be announced in the course bulletin each semester the course is offered. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 235 Tropical Plants in Costa Rica

By exploring one of the most beautiful and bio-diverse eco- systems of the world students will enrich their course study by having the unique opportunity to combine their understanding of tropical plants, gain the knowledge of their importance, and their role in sustaining the surrounding ecology. In addition, by being immersed in another culture and being engaged in cross- cultural comparisons, students will gain a better understanding of the connection between the physical environment and social environment. Prerequisite(s): Advisement and permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 236 Drainage and Irrigation

The efficiencies of various drainage and irrigation concepts are discussed as they pertain to terrain, soils, climate, and plants being grown. Water sources, availability and storage are taught along with pressure requirements and means of conveyance. When to irrigate, how to irrigate and rates of application are discussed as they relate to soils and terrain. Prerequisite(s): Department approval or HOR 129. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 238 Turfgrass Culture

A study of fine turfgrasses: soil, propagation, maintenance, growth requirements, and identification characteristics. Numerous materials, equipment, operations, usages, programs, and work procedures for proper and efficient management of specialized turfgrass areas, including golf courses and institutional and residential properties are studied. Prerequisite(s): HOR 101 Corequisite(s): HOR 238L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 241 IPM for Landscape Pests

Discussion of alternative pest control programs with emphasis on their safety and environmental quality. Such programs will include: mechanical or physical removal of the pest, biological control such as introduction of beneficial organisms (both micro and macro organisms), and chemical control. Chemical control will be discussed in conjunction with other methods as a last resort. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 248 Woody Plant Diagnostic Technology

This course will cover the techniques and procedures required for proper identification of woody plant problems. The student will be required to draw upon the cumulative educational experiences of the first three semesters in identifying insect disease, site and physiological problems affecting woody plants. The use of keys and integrated control measures will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): HOR 101, 211, 201 Corequisite(s): HOR 248L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 250 Plant Propagation

A study of the fundamental techniques and the theory and principles involved in the production of horticultural plants by seeds, cuttings, layering, and grafting. Corequisite(s): HOR 250L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 252 Ecology

The study of the relationships of organisms to their environment and to each other. Emphasis is on plant relationships. Field trips will be taken to various ecological plant communities. Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 255 Interior Landscaping

The course will concentrate on the design, installation and maintenance of interior plantings in both commercial and residential settings. Topics include principles of design, preparation of plans, interior horticultural practices, and cost estimating. Prerequisite(s): HOR 218 Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 265 Horticulture: Special Project (A)

This independent study course offers students experience in research and its application to the horticulture industry. Under the direction of a faculty member, students select a topic of interest within their area of specialization. The number of credits will be determined by the complexity of the program agreed upon by the student and the Department Chairperson. Credits: 1-3 (0,0,1 to 3)

HOR 266 Horticulture: Special Project (B)

This independent study course offers students experience in research and its application to the horticulture industry. Under the direction of a faculty member, students select a topic of interest within their area of specialization. The number of credits will be determined by the complexity of the program agreed upon by the student and the Department Chairperson. Credits: 1 to 3 (0,0,3 to 9)

HOR 267 Horticulture: Special Project (C)

This independent study course offers students experience in research and its application to the horticulture industry. Under the direction of a faculty member, students select a topic of interest within their area of specialization. The number of credits will be determined by the complexity of the program agreed upon by the student and the Department Chairperson. Credits: 1 to 3 (0,0,3 to 9)

HOR 268 Horticulture: Special Project (D)

This independent study course offers students experience in research and its application to the horticulture industry. Under the direction of a faculty member, students select a topic of interest within their area of specialization. The number of credits will be determined by the complexity of the program agreed upon by the student and the Department Chairperson. Credits: 1 to 3 (0,0,3 to 9)

HOR 269 Horticulture: Special Project (E)

This independent study course offers students experience in research and its application to the horticulture industry. Under the direction of a faculty member, students select a topic of interest within their area of specialization. The number of credits will be determined by the complexity of the program agreed upon by the student and the Department Chairperson. Credits: 1 to 3 (0,0,3 to 9)

HOR 271 Landscape Engineering Tech

This course will study landscape structures and landscape features with an emphasis on engineering principles and hands on applications. Topics will include: concrete construction, brick, bluestone and modular patios, wall construction, retaining wall engineering, pavings, walks, and drives, fence and gate construction, decorative pools, fountains, drainage structures, landscape lighting, pergolas arbors, gazebos. Labs will consist of engineering layout and construction of patios, decks, fences, etc. Prerequisite(s): HOR 171 Corequisite(s): HOT 271L Credits: 2 (1,3,4)

HOR 275 Italian Gardens: Art and Nature

This course is held in conjunction with Florence University of the Arts during a three week summer semester in Italy. Participants have the opportunity to study and experience the rich history of Italian gardens, particularly those created during the Renaissance and Baroque ages, in and around Florence. Students become garden detectives and peel away the layers of garden additions, deletions, and restorations in order to understand and experience landscapes as they were first conceived and constructed in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. The contemporary layout, artifacts, and plants within each garden are compared with historic accounts and illustrations depicting the original layout. The patrons, architects, and artists who created and contributed to each garden and the design theories they employed will be discussed "in situ" and through museum visitation. Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 290 Internship in Urban Horticulture & Design

An internship within the field of horticulture and landscape design provides students with valuable professional work experience in an appropriate industry setting. Feedback reporting maximizes the potential for reflection, personal and professional growth through discussion with faculty advisors and peer cohorts. This intensive applied learning opportunity supports and enhances classroom activities. Prerequisite(s): Completion of 50 credits with a GPA of 3.0 and/or permission of the Department chair. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

HOR 310 Perennial Plant Management

This course is a practical field study addressing the horticultural management of herbaceous perennials plants grown within garden settings. As the growing season progresses, students will experience the growth cycle changes that occur to hardy, herbaceous, perennial plants. Students will learn the maintenance requirements that plant growth dictates and advancing senescence necessitates. Prerequisite(s): HOR 204 Corequisite(s): HOR 310L Credits: 2 (1,4)

HOR 311 Woody Plants III: Advanced Topics

This course supplements topics addressed in the core woody plant curriculum and expands in new directions. Contemporary topics will be discussed such as native vs. non-native plants, invasive plants and alternatives, xeriscaping and sustainable plant selection. It is hoped that students will hone their ability to select appropriate woody plant material for challenging landscape situations and become aware of contemporary issues in horticulture. Guest speakers, outdoor laboratory exercises and field trips will be organized to complement classroom instruction. Prerequisite(s): HOR 211 and HOR 212 Corequisite(s): HOR 311L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 312 Selecting and Designing with Native Plants

The appropriate selection and use of native plants (herbaceous and woody species) balances aesthetic demands with environmental concerns and the needs of local flora and fauna. This course will first explore the meaning of "native" and the scientific basis for utilizing species indigenous to the New York City metropolitan area. We will then address plant selection in the context of specialized ecological communities and the design of landscapes with native plant material. Classroom instruction will be supplemented with visits by experts and trips to sites that illustrate course concepts. Prerequisite(s): HOR 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 315 Plants and Society

Plants and their cultivation have been an integral part of human history and will continue to be in the future. Through an in depth look at crops, including ornamental, medicinal and agricultural species, the importance of plants will be examined. Students will learn the major crops of the world, the basic science behind plant breeding, agriculture and plant based pharmaceuticals as well as the importance and limitations of emerging technologies such as genetically modified plants. Prerequisite(s): HOR 104 and BIO 192 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 320W Public Garden Management (Writing Intensive)

Students will be introduced to the range of operations that occur within botanic gardens, arboreta, and other public garden institutions, and will develop skills required to become effective managers of these living plant collections. Students will also form communication channels with public garden professions. Course requirements include a research project tailored to the student's career objectives. Following this course it is recommended students pursue a summer public garden internship. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for HOR 320 and 320W; HOR 320W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Ornamental Horticulture Department Prerequisite(s): HOR 110 or 104 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 325 The Business of Horticulture

The horticulture and landscape industry presents unique business challenges. In this course students will apply horticultural theory to general principles of management, merchandising, advertising and sales as they explore settings within the green industry. Familiarity with these business aspects will allow students who complete the course to better exploit existing opportunities and launch new ventures. Traditional classroom instruction may be supplemented by site visits to horticulture enterprises and lectures delivered by accomplished industry professionals, including program alumni. Prerequisite(s): BUS 111 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 330 Weed Science and Management

Discussion of the origin and history of weed science and weed control. Life cycle, growth and development, weed interference and competition with plants will also be explored. The course will also emphasize physical, cultural, biological and chemical control of weeds. Herbicides and their selectivity, performance and methods of application will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): HOR 104 or HOR 110 Corequisite(s): HOR 330L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 340 The Sustainable Garden

Healthy sustainable landscapes provide benefits to human functioning, health and well being. But just what is a "healthy landscape?" What are the major tenets of "Sustainability?" What does it mean to "Go Green?" In the Sustainable Garden course we will define, investigate and promote sustainable garden design, land development and management practices. We will investigate how to transform sites with and without buildings utilizing integrated sustainable principles. The course will provide students with tools to address increasingly urgent global concerns such as climate change, loss of biodiversity, and resource depletion. It will have value for those who design, construct, operate and maintain landscapes. Prerequisite(s): HOR 131 Corequisite(s): HOR 340L Credits: 3 (2,2)

HOR 350 The Art History of Garden Design and Landscape Architecture

Gardens and cultivated landscapes are works of art whose development offers a historical snapshot of the societies and historical movements that shaped them. Studying the evolution of gardens, landscapes and urban spaces in Europe, Asia and North America allows us to interpret the history, art and cultures of these regions. This historical survey charts the designed landscape from pre-history to the present with an emphasis on the historical perspective, analytical skills and specialized vocabulary necessary to understand and describe gardens, landscapes and the artistic movements they reflect. Note: Students cannot get credit for HOR 350 and 350W; HOR 350W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Ornamental Horticulture Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 360 Landscape Surveying Skills

This elective course is intended for Landscape Development and General Horticulture students who wish to develop skills in the use of basic surveying instruments such as tape, level and transit. These skills are used to record existing location of structures and ground form. Students will learn to use these methods for installation of new structures and alteration of landform. Conventional methods for recording notes and standard methods in mathematical procedures will be covered. Prerequisite(s): HOR 171 Corequisite(s): HOR 360L Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 366 Special Topics in Horticulture

Topics of current interest in ornamental horticulture will be presented and covered in depth. Course material will vary semester to semester and reflect pressing issues and topics facing the field. Subject material will be announced prior to registration for the semester. Prerequisite(s): HOR 101 and HOR 104 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 370 Landscape Professional Practices

This is a course about the student's future as a horticulturist, landscape designer, contractor, a business professional and a citizen. Students will learn the skills required to start and manage a professional practice in his/her chosen field. The basics of business structure, insurance, contracts, and business investment will be addressed. Students will produce a cohesive business plan that incorporates defining their marketplace, developing a communication strategy, and cash-flow planning. They will also learn how to put together a portfolio and make effective use of technology to leverage the efficiency of their existing or proposed practice. Prerequisite(s): HOR 207 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HOR 371 Landscape CAD I

This course is an introduction to computer aided design/ drafting. This course includes all the functions of AutoCad plus specific tools and solutions for professionals in the land development industry. This course will focus solely on two-dimensional aspects of AutoCad. Each student will acquire CAD experience from using the program at his or her own workstation. We will perform exercises to develop skills from file set-up to creating 2D drawings to plotting. Our goal in the class is to become comfortable, efficient and competent computer drafters. Each student is required to produce a landscape site plan. Prerequisite(s): HOR 207 Corequisite(s): HOR 371L Credits: 3 (1,4)

HOR 372 Site Engineering I

Landscape construction projects involve modification of the Earth's surface. This course teaches how to design, read and engineer landform. Students will be given an introduction to grading and surveying landscape contours. They will develop knowledge of grading around buildings and roads as well as grading for drainage. Prerequisite(s): HOR 131 Corequisite(s): HOR 372L Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 410 Plant Production Technology

This course is intended to study the commercial greenhouse and nursery production of cut flowers, flowering potted plants, and nursery stock. The physiological and flowering responses of plants to light, temperature, nutrients, and gases will be addressed. Plant identification, propagation, production, scheduling, finishing, and marketing for the economic production of greenhouse and nursery crops will be studied. Prerequisite(s): Department chair approval or HOR 250 Credits: 4 (3,2)

HOR 471 Landscape CAD II

This course is an advanced course in computer aided design/drafting. This course will focus on providing additional time developing skills introduced in Landscape CAD I, and introduce advanced three- dimensional aspects of AutoCad. Each student will acquire CAD experience from using the program at his or her own workstation. Each student is required to produce a comprehensive set of landscape construction plans. Prerequisite(s): HOR 371 Corequisite(s): HOR 471L Credits: 3 (1,0,4)

HOR 472 Site Engineering II

Landscape plans require engineered drainage design, engineered irrigation design and lighting design. The course covers advanced grading design processes, storm water management principles and techniques using the hydrologic cycle, and designing advanced lighting systems to create beautiful night landscapes. Irrigation design will cover various types of irrigation for the landscape. Prerequisite(s): HOR 372 Corequisite(s): HOR 472T Credits: 3 (2,3)

HOR 474 Design Capstone Project

This course is the culmination of the Landscape Development design sequence. This capstone course integrates landscape design and site engineering design philosophies and methodologies into a comprehensive studio project. The intent of the course is to help the student to synthesize skills and knowledge learned in other courses to apply in real-life situations. This multidisciplinary project incorporates landscape design and site planning analysis, site engineering, construction, energy and sustainability, cost estimating and plant selection. Faculty directs the development of individually determined projects in response to defined objectives, critical commentary of advisory panels and periodic formal reviews. Students present their final project to the full faculty at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): Department approval or HOR 220, 371 and 372. Credits: 4 (2,4)

HOR 475 Horticulture Practicum

The Horticulture Practicum represents a culmination of the four-year general horticulture curriculum. Students engage in a focused project or a broad survey of an appropriate industry setting approved and supervised by a faculty mentor and, if applicable, an industry representative. Throughout the Practicum students will be challenged to synthesize course theory and skills, and apply them in a practical manner. Participants will reflect and report on their experiences to their supervisors and peers in both oral and written formats. Prerequisite(s): Department Chair approval. Students enrolled in HOR475 should have upper division status and substantial completion of the program. Credits: 4 (2,4)

HEALTH STUDIES

HST 101 Current Issues in Health

This introductory, multidisciplinary course will provide the student with a broad background of information on current issues in health care. This course is designed to facilitate and enhance the professional growth of future health care providers. Topics will include common and emerging health problems, an examination of the health care delivery system, effective wellness behaviors and common ethical issues occurring in health care today. Credits: 3 (3,0,0)

HST 103 Currents Topics in Gerontology

This three credit elective course will provide an overview on a number of topics related to aging in today's society. Topics will include current theories on aging, the physiology of aging, psycho-social aspects of aging, health issues, end of life decision making, sexuality and spirituality in aging and social policies affecting the elderly in America today. Essential concepts related to the senior citizen will be examined from multiple view points, including that of the client, the family, the health care provider and the health care system. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HST 105 Medical Terminology

This course is the study of medical terminology. The focus is on prefixes, suffixes, word roots and their combining forms by an introduction to medical word building and the general structure of the body and its various body systems. Students will learn word construction, spelling, usage, comprehension, and phonetic 'sounds like' pronunciations as well as some common medical abbreviations. This course is just right for Health Studies students who are considering a career in dental hygiene, nursing, or medical technology. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HST 301 Health Care Organization

This is a survey course introducing the student to the concepts related to the organization of health care in the United States. Health care will be studied from a historical, political, economic and consumer perspective. Focus will include exploring the commonly used models of health care delivery and organization in the United States and selected other countries. Health Care in this country has undergone tremendous change and expansion since the turn of the last century. As we begin the next century many health care issues remain controversial and a top priority in the minds of many Americans. Access to adequate preventive and episodic health care, organ transplantation and gene therapy are just a few of the interesting topics that will be touched upon. NOTE: Students who take NUR300 cannot receive credit for HST301. NOTE: Students who take HST301 cannot receive credit for NUR300. Prerequisite(s): HST 101 or Permission of the Nursing Department. Credits: 3 (3,0)

HUMANITIES

HUM 305 Culture and Technology

This course is a multidisciplinary examination of the ways in which technology affected everyday life during the Industrial Revolution in England. Covering the years 1750 to 1880, it examines the changes taking place in technology during the period; how these changes ultimately affected the workplace, the home, and the community and how novelists of the period felt about these changes. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for HIS305, SOC305, or IDP305. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher and HIS 114 and 115 Credits: 3 (3,0)

HUM 317 Special Topics in the Humanities

This course enables students to explore intensely a major theme or period in the humanities. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Topics may include Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on China, Propaganda in Marketing and Advertising, among others. Short papers involving secondary sources will be required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

HUM 332 Intercultural Communication

This course is designed to develop an understanding of how specific interpersonal techniques can facilitate effective intercultural communication encounters. Students will be exposed to the ways in which cultural differences affect intercultural communications. Obstacles to effective intercultural communication will be examined and techniques to overcome these will be explored and practiced. Credits: 3 (3,0)

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

IND 303 Planning and Controlling Operation

This course is an introduction to the concepts and techniques of sales and operations planning; managing inventory; master scheduling; material requirements planning production activity control; supply chain information system process mapping; JIT/Lean production; and Kanban systems. Case studies covering these topics will be included. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BUS 303. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 306 Project and Contract Management

This course covers the processes encountered in choosing, planning, controlling and negotiating of projects and contracts in technologically-based firms. Topics include projects and contracts: feasibility; risk analysis; selection; portfolio optimization; cost estimation and controls; capital budgeting; performance relating to negotiation, adjustments, and benchmark standards; and awareness of an appreciation for ethical practices. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BUS 306. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 308 Occupational Safety

This course introduces the fundamentals of occupational safety and examines potential accidents, which may occur in the modern work environment that employs complex materials, processes and technologies. We will review the history and safety legislation of the regulatory agency OSHA. Acquiring and analyzing hazard information, organizing and setting up occupational safety programs, accident causes, and their control and accident record keeping will be addressed. Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 309 Security and Fire Protection Systems

Assessing a facility's need for and recommending as well as managing the design, procurement, installation, and operation of access intrusion detection, closed circuit television (CCTV), security lighting, fire alarms, and fire suppression systems; establishing policies, procedures, and practices for systems operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluating systems performances; researching and assessing technical developments in the security and fire protection fields. Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 310 Industrial Hygiene

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of industrial hygiene as well as to a recognition of health hazards in the facility environment. This course includes analysis of solvents, particulates, industrial dermatoses, industrial noises, ionizing and noniodizing radiation, temperature extremes, biological hazards, and indoor air quality issues. A study of methods with which to evaluate exposures to hazardous substances; a detailed analysis of control programs; and an examination of environmental protection acts and amendments are also included. Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 315 Facilities Planning

This course is designed to introduce a comprehensive overview of the concepts and techniques to generate facility plans. The course includes the determination of the requirements for people, equipment, space, and material in the facility along with the evaluation, selection, preparation, presentation, implementation and maintenance of the facility plans. An overview of the components of a building structure, its envelope and related items are also discussed. Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 316 Customer Relations and Quality

This course covers the basics of customer relations and quality in industry. The course includes discussion of quality management principles and standards as well as feedback techniques to measure and assure customer satisfaction. The American Customer Satisfaction Index, J.D. Power and Associates Reports, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Automotive Quality System QS-9000 registration criteria will also be discussed. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit BUS 316. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 317 Automotive Financing and Leasing

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic economic problems and principles that exist when a vehicle or other equipment is purchased or leased. Problems are centered around the cost of capital, capital budgeting and investment analysis. Also discussed are repayment schedules including amortized loans, refinancing and variable rate loans. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 320 Fleet Management

This course is designed to provide students with a practical discussion and examination of the fleet management function, as well as how it relates to an organization. Included in the course are automotive specific computer applications such as service establishment management software. Also, the course will include discussions on business plans, fleet utilization and replacement, human resources, parts management, safety requirements and data services. This course will consist of presentations, case studies, and a review of management literature. Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 400 Quality Techniques

This covers quality tools and techniques used in problem solving and decision making. Topics include: Pareto charts; cause and effects diagram; check sheets; histograms; scatter diagrams; quality function deployment; statistical process control; continuous improvement; Goldratt's theory of constraints; benchmarking; just-in time manufacturing; and implementing total quality. A written assignment will be required that integrates quality topics with problem solving and decision making tools and techniques. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for BUS 400 Prerequisite(s): BUS 240 and MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 402 Facility Maintenance Management

This objective of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of the management, administration and control of a facilities maintenance department, including an overview of business and financial issues work order systems; prioritizing, planning and scheduling of maintenance, construction, custodial and grounds keeping work; the contract cycle and components. Prerequisite(s): BUS 300 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 405 HVAC Systems

This course covers design aspects of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, hydronic systems for commercial and residential applications. Design and selection of heating and cooling system components, boilers, air handling units, refrigeration systems, hydronic system components, terminal equipment, fans, pumps, compressed air properties and indoor air quality are also covered. Students are required to prepare term projects on heating and cooling load calculations for commercial and residential buildings. Prerequisite(s): MET 212, MET 230 and MET 314 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 406 Energy Management

This course covers a comprehensive study of various forms of energy generated from fossil fuels, alternative and renewable energy sources and their management. This course also covers life cycle cost of each type of energy system, energy conservation programs, smart building, load management, miscellaneous methods to increase the energy efficiency of a building, utility rate structures, reduction of energy demand and rebates. In addition, energy conservation will be covered with respect to its effect on indoor air quality and other environmental issues. Prerequisite(s): MET 212, MET 230 and MET 314 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 408 Automotive Business Management

This is a theory course developed to give the student an understanding of employment practices and opportunities in the automotive industry. Topics include: management principles and structures, tasks and duties of a service manager including interview techniques, performance evaluations, and financial operations of a service facility. The course will provide the student with an understanding of owner communications, shop capacity management, leadership effectiveness, organizational behavior, and promotional strategies. Course will include related problem solving activities, and final project. Prerequisite(s): Junior class standing and BUS 300 Credits: 3 (3,0)

IND 410 Senior Project

Independent study of an Industrial Technology-related area of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. The project selected will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous Industrial Technology and related courses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for BUS 410. Prerequisite(s): BUS 409 or IND 409 Credits: 3 (1,6)

ITALIAN

ITA 121 Italian I (Elementary)

A beginning course in Italian emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 122 Italian II (Elementary)

A continuation of Italian 121 emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s): ITA 121 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 125 Italian for Business

This course will provide the development of oral proficiency used in daily communication within the business world, preparing the students both in technical vocabulary and situational usage. An introduction to specialized vocabulary in business and economics, as well as practice in writing business correspondence, will be included. Readings in management, marketing, advertising, etc. will be covered. Prerequisite(s): 2 or 3 years of High School Italian or ITA 121 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 223 Italian III (Intermediate)

A continuation of ITA 122 for students who have had 3 or 4 years of high school Italian. This intermediate course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. A literary and cultural reader will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): ITA 122 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 224 Italian IV (Intermediate)

For those students who have taken ITA 223 or four or more years of high school Italian. This course emphasizes structural review, intensified practice in oral expression with increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. Continued attention will be given to contemporary Italian culture. Selections from Italian authors will be read. Prerequisite(s): ITA 223 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 301 Italian V (Advanced)

An advanced conversation/composition course with intensive practice in oral and written Italian. Prepared discussions and writing assignments on selected cultural, historical and literary topics. Prerequisite(s): ITA 224 Credits: 3 (3,0)

ITA 302 Italian VI (Advanced)

A continuation of Italian V Advance with intensive practice in oral and written Italian. Prepared discussions and writing assignments on selected cultural, historical and literary topics. Prerequisite(s): ITA 301 (3,0) Credits: 3 (3,0)

INTERACTION DESIGN

IXD 210 Typography for Interaction

This course will allow students to build technical and practical skills for understanding and effectively utilizing typography in a range of special applications including digital, environmental and immersive application. The course investigates typographic terminology, structures, and methods for creative successful interactive experiences. Students will develop a unified method for orchestrating typography into their visual vocabulary to create cohesive solutions that successfully communicate. Experimentation will be encouraged. Prerequisite(s): VIS 116, VIS 122 all with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 3 (2,2)

IXD 212 Interaction Design I - Foundation

This course will introduce the basics of Interaction Design and the concepts and techniques necessary to develop and implement immersive, innovative experiences that inform and delight. Students will learn the rigorous process for the design of interactive solutions through research, planning, testing and iteration. Assignments will require the conception, planning and development of systems for various applications using lo-fidelity sketching techniques. Social Media, Usability and Usability testing, and Information Architecture will be covered. Class assignments will favor process and meaning over technology, limiting the use of digital tools to research and information gathering. Prerequisite(s): VIS 116, VIS 122 all with a grade of C+ or higher. Credits: 4 (2,4)

IXD 310 Interaction Design II-User Interaction

User Interaction will expand on the concepts and tools introduced in IXD-212 User Interaction I – Foundation with an emphasis on the concepts and principles of User Interaction design: effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. Usability, heuristics, user and task analysis, information architecture and graphical user interface design will be added to the student’s design vocabulary. The formal use of the computer and digital tools will be introduced and emphasized. Prerequisite(s): IXD 212 with a grade of C+ or higher. Credits: 4 (2,4)

IXD 312 Research Strategies

In this course students will learn research methods commonly used in design research. They will model interaction by conducting qualitative and quantitative research of users behaviors, attitudes and expectations through online and in person user analysis, task analysis, observational studies, customer interviews, usability testing, and other processes and methodologies that facilitate research and discovery. Students will be expected to utilize storytelling techniques to solve design problems, establish personas, develop presentation skills, and support design solutions. Class assignments will favor process and meaning over technology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (2,2)

IXD 320 Interaction Design III – User Experience

This advanced interaction design course builds on skills covered in previous IXD courses and emphasizes user-centered design and research methods and practices used in experience modeling. Students will work in teams to study users in various settings and contexts utilizing interpretive methods of analysis to discover and create solutions for problems that emerge. Projects will emphasize research and usability testing of the needs, wants, and limitations of the end users of a product, service or process at each stage of the design process ensuring effective, efficient and satisfactory experiences. Prequisite(s): IXD 310 with a grade of C+ or higher Corequisite(s): IXD 322 Credits: 4 (2,4)

IXD 322 Prototyping Tools

This course will provide students with an advanced and intensive exploration of prototyping tools. It is taken concurrently with IXD-320 Interaction Design III: User Experience. Various methods of prototyping will be used to understand, analyze, explore, and evaluate systems through the development process. Students will employ these methods to translate a concept into sketches through multiple iterations. Prototypes will be constructed using paper, pen, post-it, scissors, and non-graphical hand drawn and digital wireframes. Students will also learn to develop these concepts using various digital prototyping tools to create hi-fidelity prototypes that demonstrate an application in digital form. Prerequisite(s): IXD 310, BCS 240 with a grade of C+ or higher Corequisite(s): IXD 320 Credits: 3 (2,2)

IXD 330 Design for Social Change

In this course students will apply the skills they have learned in the IXD program to work collaboratively in identifying a social need and solving it through user-centered design. The class will work with a real world client to identify a project that addresses a social need, engages people and inspires positive change. Students will be expected to conduct design research including observational studies, customer interviews, usability testing, and other forms of research in establishing and addressing the social need. Prerequisite(s): SOC 122, IXD 212 with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 3 (2,2)

IXD 410 Interaction Design IV – Advanced Interaction Design

In this course students will work collaboratively to execute projects that include advanced application of the skills developed during the previous semesters. Students will be expected to utilize the applicable conceptual, design, prototyping, storytelling and research skills in combination with typographic and visual design to complete advanced interaction design applications. Class assignments will focus on creating finished, portfolio-ready projects using the Interaction Design Association’s definitions of interaction design categories including: Connecting: Facilitating communication between people and communities. Disrupting: Re-imagining completely an existing product or service by creating new behaviors, usages or markets. Empowering: Helping people to do things they otherwise couldn't do. Engaging: Capturing attention, creating delight and delivering meaning. Expressing: Enabling self-expression and/or creativity. Optimizing: Making daily activities more efficient. Prerequisite(s): IXD 320, IXD 322 both with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 4 (2,4)

IXD 412 Special Topics Studio

This course offers instruction in special content areas within the field of interaction design. Areas of exploration may include topics such as: Content Strategy and Research, Advanced User Experience, Advanced Technologies, Interaction Design in Advertising, Design Thinking, Psychology of Design, Systems Design and the Cultural Significance of Social Media. Depending upon the topic and the instructor(s) discipline the class may be divided into 2 -3 modules with students focusing on a different topic or aspect of a topic in each module. The class will encourage total immersion in the subject(s) presented. Students will rely on the skills developed in past classes to complete rigorous and intensive research and prototyping in the creation of design artifacts. Prerequisite(s): IXD 320, IXD 322 both with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 3 (2,2)

IXD 414 Design and Play Mechanics

Design and Play will explore the intersection of game theory and game mechanics to design interfaces, experiences and objects that encourage playful interactions and behavioral change in traditionally non-game contexts such as business and education. Concepts such as Gamification for education and business and identification of interaction models will be investigated. Interaction design as it relates to increasing user engagement by adding “fun” components will be explored in-depth. Prerequisite(s): IXD 320, IXD 322 both with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 3 (2,2)

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

MET 104 Computer Aided Drafting and Design

This course introduces computer aided drafting and design (CADD) in 2D drafting and 3D solid modeling. Students will learn traditional drafting techniques, such as orthographic projection, dimensioning, and tolerancing, and apply their drafting skill though 2D CAD software. Students will also learn 3D solid modeling based on parametric constraints, dimensions and features such as extrude, revolve, sweep, loft, hole, fillet and shell. In addition, the course teaches students how to create assemblies and 2D engineering drawings from the existing 3D solids. Laboratory exercises will be assigned to the students for hands-on experience with the related topics. This course is equivalent to the combination of GPH103, GPH104, and MET211. Corequisite(s): MET 104L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 109 Computer Programming and Applications

This is an introductory course in a computer programming language. Programs are specifically written to be used in the areas of statics, strength of materials, machine design, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. Applications of the theoretical concepts are covered in the required laboratory. Corequisite(s): MET 109L Credits: 2 (1,2)

MET 117 Manufacturing Process

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the mechanical engineering technology student to the principles and operation of mechanical equipment such as lathes, drill press, milling machines and measuring requirements and measuring instruments. Several manufacturing processes such as welding, powder metallurgy, sheet metal forming, extrusion, etc. are also covered. Individual laboratory projects will be assigned to each student to reinforce the topics covered in the theory. NOTE: Students completing this course may not receive credit for AET 218T. Corequisite(s): MET 117L Credits: 2 (1,3)

MET 127 Advanced Manufacturing Processes

This course is a continuation of MET 117. Topics emphasize the theory and operation of manual and numerically controlled milling machines and machining centers. Additional topics covered are the gear shaper, indexing head, point-to-point drilling and milling, and three axis measurement. Laboratory projects will be assigned to reinforce the topics covered in theory. Prerequisite(s): MET 117 Corequisite(s): MET 127L Credits: 2 (1,3)

MET 201 Statics

This is a basic course in statics. The main objective of this course is to provide student with a basic understanding of the principles of statics. Topics such as resultant of a force, equilibrium of forces, moments, couples, analysis of simple trusses, centroids, center of gravity, moments of inertia and friction are covered in this course. Applications of the theoretical concepts are covered in the required laboratory. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for CON 106. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130 and PHY 135 Corequisite(s): MET 201L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 205W Material Science (Writing Intensive)

This is a theory and laboratory course designed to give students a basic understanding of crystal structures, effects of cold work and annealing on metal structures and properties, phase diagrams, heat treatment of steel, corrosion of materials, failure analysis of ferrous and non- ferrous alloys, ceramics, plastics and composite materials. Laboratory experiments are associated with the topics covered in the theory. Students will write technical reports throughout the semester as well as final presentations to help them communicate effectively in specific writing related to their fields. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Corequisite(s): MET 205L Note: Students cannot get credit for MET 205 and 205W; MET 205W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement, which is offered at the discretion of the Automotive & Mechanical Engineering Technology Department. Credits: 3 (2,0)

MET 206 Strength of Materials

This is a basic course in Strength of Materials. The main objective of this course is to introduce the concepts of stress, strain, torsion, bending and shear stresses. It also covers shear moment diagrams, deformations and modes of failure, Mohr's Circle; also included are topics in thermal and combined stresses. Laboratory demonstration of experiments and testing equipment are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): MET 201 or CON 106 Corequisite(s): MET 206L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 207 Tool Design

This course covers the fundamentals of tool design, with main focus on the principles of jigs and fixtures design. Topics covered include: General tool design, economics of tool design, materials used for tooling, work holding principles, jig design, fixture design, die design and operation, power presses, metal cutting, forming and drawing. Students will be using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software packages in designing different jigs and fixtures. Applications of the theoretical concepts and hands-on 3D CAD modeling are covered in the required laboratory. Prerequisite(s): MET104, MET127 Corequisite(s): MET 207L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 211 Advanced Computer Graphics

This is a laboratory course which introduces advanced topics in computer graphics including advanced dimensioning and tolerancing, 3-D wire frame, surface of revolution, solids, in computer graphics. Laboratory exercises will be assigned to the students for hands-on experience with the related topics. Prerequisite(s): GPH 103 and GPH 104 Credits: 1 (0,2)

MET 212 Applied Fluid Mechanics

The objective of this course is to represent the basic principles of fluid mechanics and the application of those principles to practical, applied problems. Primary emphasis is on the topics of fluid statics, flow of fluids in piping systems, flow measurement, and forces developed by fluids in motion. The course is directed to anyone in a technical field where the ability to apply the principles of fluid mechanics is desirable. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130, PHY 136 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 215 Special Topics in Engineering

This course will cover various applications of basic principles of statics, strength of materials, electrical principles, introduction to basic principles of electromechanical control systems and introduction to Robotics and automation systems. Students will work on independent projects related to various engineering concepts by utilizing various CAD software. This course can be used as a Technical Elective for Mechanical Engineering Technology and Manufacturing Engineering Technology B.S. Degree programs. Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 230 Electrical Principles

This hands-on and theory course introduces electrical principles to Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Technology and Facility Management Technology students. Emphasis will be on power systems that utilize alternating current. Course topics include resistive and R-L-C series and parallel circuits, instrumentation, single and three-phase circuits that contain motors, transformers, starters and low voltage controls, and an overview of electronic applications to mechanical systems. Electrical logic (ladder) diagrams will be stressed throughout the semester. Laboratory assignments will reinforce the topics covered by theory through relevant experiments performed by the student and will include the writing of laboratory reports. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130 and PHY 136 Corequisite(s): MET 230L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 251 Numerical Control

In this course, the fundamental skills and knowledge of the IBM System/360 APT Numerical Control programming language are developed. Students will be required to write and run APT programs on the Department's numerical control system. Students will also process programs to produce EIA-NC code suitable for machine control. Prerequisite(s): MET 104, MET 127 and MTH 129 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 252 Quality Control (Metrology)

This course covers different aspects of dimensional metrology principles, calibrations, and practices. Common measurement tools and methods used in the industry will be introduced. Topics covered include: Gage Blocks, Fixed Gages, Height Gages, Plug Gages, Dial Gages, Angle Measurements, Pneumatic Gages, Surface Metrology, Optical Metrology, Load Cells Calibration, Introduction to GD&T, and Gage R&R Analysis. Laboratory exercises covered include: Gage Blocks Stacking and Calibration, Dial Gages & Plug Gages in Inspection, Micrometer Calibration, Transducers & Load Cell Calibration, Surface Roughness measurements and analysis, Angle measurements using Sign Bar, Gear Inspection, Air Gage Inspection, Inspection of Flatness, Straightness, Perpendicularity. Prerequisite(s): MET 104, MET 127 Corequisite(s): MET 252L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 300 Computer Aided Engineering CAE

This course will introduce the technology students to the important subject of engineering design and finite element analysis. The course material builds on the students’ previous experience in computer graphics and strength of materials and introduces them to the modern concepts of concurrent engineering and design for manufacturability. The students will learn how to import their graphic drawings from the Computer Aided Design (CAD) to the Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software and apply the loads and appropriate boundary condition. The application of CAE in linear stress and deformation analysis of mechanical systems and fluid mechanics will be the essential part of this course. Computer simulations will be performed during the required laboratory section using the CAD and finite element simulation software. Prerequisite(s): MET 206 and MET 104 and MET 109 Corequisite(s): MET 300L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 304 Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

In this course, the concepts of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) as applied to the areas of Computer Aided Design (CAD), Design Office Automation, Computer Aided Engineering (CAE), Management Materials Tracking with Bar Code Technology and Network Communication will be studied. Students will gain hands-on experience using the colleges computer system and software. Laboratory projects will cover real world concepts. Prerequisite(s): MET 104 Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 305 Tooling for Composites

This is a theory and laboratory course covering an introduction to advanced composite materials and design of production tools and parts. Some included topics are: mold designs, open mold process, resin transfer molding, vacuum infusion process, compression molding, filament winding, and inspection and repair. Design assignments will be given to students which require utilizing the computer laboratories to use the 3-dimensional (3D) parametric design software packages. Prerequisite(s): MET 207 Corequisite(s): MET 305L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 307 Electromechanical Control Sys

This course covers the fundamentals and physical principles of electro-pneumatic and hydraulic control circuits. Pneumatic and hydraulic components such as directional control valves, flow control valves, and pressure control valves will be covered. The course also covers programmable logic controller (PLC) using Allen-Bradley MicroLogix controller. Students will be designing and troubleshooting PLC controlled hydraulic and electro-pneumatic circuits in the laboratory. Automation Studio software will be used in designing and simulation of control circuits. Prerequisite: MET 230 Corequisite: MET 307L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 308 Machine and Product Design

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of machine component design. Subjects covered include safety factors, theories of failure, shaft design, roller bearings, gear design, spring design, pressure vessels, and fasteners. The laboratory section includes analysis of stresses (principal stresses and maximum shear stresses), applications of plane stress (combined loadings, pressure vessels, and beams), design of shafts and shaft components, and design of springs. Prerequisite(s): MET 206 Corequisite(s): MET 308L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 314 Applied Thermodynamics

This course lays the groundwork for the student's future studies in the area of thermal design, encompassing the fields of power, heating, air conditioning and refrigeration. Topics covered include basics such as the first and second laws of thermodynamics, equations of state for gases and vapors, and psychometrics. Building on this foundation, thermodynamic processes and cycles will be introduced, including the Carnot, and Vapor Compression refrigeration cycles. Thermal equipment such as boilers, turbines, evaporators, condensers, compressors and heat exchangers will be analyzed. Prerequisite(s): PHY 136 and MTH 130 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 351 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)

This course provides the student with experience in computer graphics NC programming techniques. Students will generate 2-D and 3-D parts on CAM software and analyze the tool paths required for various types of machining operations. Programs will be processed to produce EIA-NC code which will then be loaded into a CNC machine to manufacture a part. Students will also create 2-D and 3-D files on CAD software and learn how to export the CAD files to CAM software. Prerequisite(s): MET 127 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 405 Dynamics

This course covers rectilinear motion of particles (position, velocity, and acceleration), such as uniform rectilinear motion, uniformly accelerated rectilinear motion, and introduction to motion of several particles. In addition, an introduction to curvilinear motion of particles, as well as kinetics of particles: Newton's second law of motion, principles of work and energy and applications, impulse and momentum theory, and applications of the above topics to engineering problems will be covered in this course. Prerequisite(s): MET 201 and MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 406 Electronic Packaging Applications

This is a theory and laboratory course covering an introduction to electronic packaging application with the printed circuit board design of analog and digital schematics. Also included in the course is application of thermal, radio frequency, electromagnetic, shock and vibration effects. Laboratory will reinforce the topics covered in theory through projects using the College’s computer graphics equipment. Prerequisite(s): MET 207 Corequisite(s): MET 406L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 409 Statistical Quality Control

Students will be introduced to techniques for determining the quality of mass manufactured products by means of statistical analysis. State of-the-art computers and software will be used to generate and analyze process control charts and histograms, plus continuous variables, and attribute control charts. Tests for special causes and capability analysis of a process will be addressed. Prediction of the probable percentage defective in a monitored process as well as the producer's and customer's risk will be emphasized. Students will learn to define the Acceptance Quality Level (AQL) and the military sampling plans (MIL Standard). Applications of the theoretical concepts are covered in the required laboratory. Prerequisite(s): MET 109, MET 252, MTH 110 Corequisite(s): MET 409L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 410 Senior Project

An independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor. The project selected will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in earlier MET studies. Required for graduation from the Bachelor of Science program in Manufacturing Engineering Technology. Prerequisite(s): Approval of this department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 411 Applied Heat Transfer

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of problems of heat transfer. The fundamental laws of conduction, convection, and radiation are studied using analytical and graphical methods. Graphical and empirical solutions and applications to industrial problems will also be covered plus special topics in heat exchangers, heat pipes, and industrial furnaces. Prerequisite(s): MET 212, MTH 236 or MTH 151 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MET 415 Robotics

Students will be introduced to robotics from both a theoretical and practical aspect. Different types of robots and their applications in industry will be covered. Financial management and return on investment of the robotics applications will be discussed. Additional topics included are motion transmission and control of robot mechanisms, robot programming, the use of robots in an integrated manufacturing cell, and practical uses of the robot vision system. Hands-on experience on actual working robots and the application of the theory will be provided in the laboratory. Prerequisite: MET 307 Corequisite(s): MET 415L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MET 417 Modern Manufacturing Systems

This course is designed to enrich the student's practical knowledge with hands-on experience of full-scale modern manufacturing systems and actual industrial machining centers. This course is composed of theory and laboratory parts; the laboratory part of the course will be held in the Institute for Manufacturing Research (IMR) of the college which offers the state of the art manufacturing systems and techniques. The students will work in teams to design 3-D mechanical parts for manufacturability and practice the concepts of concurrent engineering and teamwork. Prerequisite(s): MET 351 Credits: 3 (2,2)

MODERN LANGUAGES

MLG 100 Introduction to World Languages

This course will introduce students to the wide variety of languages across the globe. What are language “families”? How are they similar? How are they different? How and why do languages change over time? How do different languages express thought and emotion through words and sentence structure? The relationship of a particular language to history, geography, politics and society will be emphasized throughout this course, with the help of a user-friendly companion website. Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 201 Italian Food, Culture, and History

This course analyzes the history of Italian food and its connections to historic events and cultural changes that took place in the most representative Italian cities and regions from the Middle Ages through the present. The Italian cities and historical periods analyzed are selected to provide a broad historical and social perspective that aim to be both a history of Italian food and a history of Italy through its food. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 300 International Cinema

Selected international films will be viewed, analyzed, and discussed in terms of their historical, social, political, and economic context as well as for their aesthetic value. Readings, lectures, and class discussions are organized to teach coherency in reading filmic works. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 301 Italian Cinema (In English)

Representative Italian films, from the post-war and Neorealism to the present, will be viewed, analyzed and discussed. Films are selected to provide a broad historical and social perspective as seen through the artistic vision of individual directors. The course will be conducted in English and all films have English subtitles. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 302 Spanish and Latin American Cinema

In this course, representative Spanish and Latin American movies that cover periods from Romanticism to contemporary times will be analyzed, viewed and discussed. Films will be chosen to discuss social, philosophical, political and identity problems as well as its interpretation according to the artistic vision and directors' achievements and goals. Theory and history of film genres of Spain and Latin America cinema will be studied. The course will be conducted in English and all movies have English subtitles. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 303 French Cinema (In English)

Representative French films from the lyrical traditional cinema to the New Wave of the sixties and to the new humanism of the present, will be viewed, analyzed and discussed. Films are selected to provide a broad historical, ideological and social perspective as seen through the eyes of individual directors. The course will be conducted in English and all films have English subtitles. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 304 French Culture and Civilization

An examination of contemporary France and its political, economic and social development. French cultural life and institutions in France will also be considered. This course may not be used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 305 Hispanic and Latin American Culture and Civilization

Civilization course: Provides a general perspective on the formation of the Latin American Culture through the centuries, with special emphasis on Spanish America. In parallel form, historical and cultural evolution of the New World and the Iberian Peninsula will be studied, from their beginnings up to the present. Among other aspects, the course will give special attention to the rich multicultural heritage which has been maintained in Latin America through the centuries, as well as its achievements in Art and Literature. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 306 Italian Culture and Civilization

An examination of contemporary Italy and its political, economic and social development. Italian cultural life and institutions in Italy will also be considered. This course may not be used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirements. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 307 French and Francophone Fiction and Film

This course will explore the relationship between literary works and their film adaptations in France and all over the French-speaking world. Selections will be read from novels, short stories, and poems, and major literary movements will be discussed. Students will analyze how literary images and themes are translated onto the big screen. Topics include the French heritage novel, the North African Arab/ French experience, the West African and Caribbean Negritude Movements, and French-Canadian literature and film. All readings and films in English translation. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 308 Arabic Culture and Civilization

This course examines Arabic culture and civilization through an analysis of historical, educational, social and climatic factors. The course will focus on issues arising out of intra-cultural and intercultural communication with today's economic and socio-political currents focusing on American and Arab relations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 309 Arabic Cinema

This course examines a diverse body of motion pictures produced in the Arab world. Through films, critical readings and in class discussion, students will acquire and develop an understanding of Arabic culture and a great appreciation for the art history of Arab Cinema from across the 22 Arab nations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 310 Latin American Women Writers

This course focuses on the works of major Latin-American women writers from the 17th to the 20th century. We will analyze poems, short stories and novels and how women have been portrayed in literature. The theoretical approach to this class will be based on contemporary feminist critics. We will study the works of the first 17th century Mexican feminist writer, The Nun, Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz, as well as the works of Elena Poniatowska, Julia Alvarez and Laura Ezquivel among others. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for SPA 310. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 311 Italian American Experiences

"Italian American Experiences" is an introduction to the experiences of people that created a unique and distinctive ethnic culture. The course begins with fundamental Italian heritage and examines the role of immigration and assimilation in a new world as Italian culture combined with the American experience to form the Italian-American culture. Italian-American studies offer students an opportunity to survey development in history, literature, media, art, and sociology. It also provides students with an in-depth exploration of the role ethnicity plays in what it means to be an Italian-American. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 312 Contemporary Latin American Short Stories

An introduction to different literary movements reflected in Latin American Short Stories in translation during the 20th Century. The emphasis will be the lyrical basis of the realistic, surrealistic and supernatural elements in the stories of Latin American Writers. Modern women writers' esthetics and poetic sensitivity as well as humor and sarcasm will be included in both the observation of individual psychology and tales of the absurd. Summarizing, and using Anderson Imbert's three basic definitions, the focus of this course will be: a) reality (realism); b) the supernatural (literature of the fantastic); c) the strange (magic realism). Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for SPA 312. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 313 Science, Literature, and Film in the Hispanic World

This course takes an integrated vision of reality in which the sciences and technologies, together with the humanities, take active part in the sociocultural system. This course synthesizes two supposedly antagonistic systems: the humanities and the sciences, and creates a communication between humanists and scientists. The course traces how the Hispanic world represented scientific activities in history and examines the interplay between sciences and humanities through Hispanic literature and film. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 314 Hispanic Fiction to Film

Fiction like film is a narrative storytelling art form. In this class students will study the adaption of written, fictional works and their correspondent films. Students will also study the narrative devices, techniques and formal properties used to tell a story that are particular to film but not found in literature, such as camera angle, camera distance, editing, cross-cutting, montage, framing, and camera movement. This course will take a critical approach to examining the narrative language utilized by fiction and film with the objective of developing a more critical eye for interpreting both mediums. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 315 Art, Culture and Civilization of Spain

Study of Spain, a multicultural and multilingual nation, not as a homogeneous entity but rather as a heterogeneous tapestry of various culture and languages. The corpus of cultural texts studied will be derived from the realms of literature, film, architecture, music and the visual arts. They will be analyzed within their socio- historical context as well as their aesthetic value. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit for SPA 315. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 316 French Fables and Folktales

This course will examine the literary tradition of the fable, the folktale, the fairy tale, the myth, and the legend in France throughout the centuries. Starting with the period of King Clovis I in the late 400s A.D. and ending with 20th century folklore, we will delve into the nature of these short stories, asking a variety of questions. Who is the intended audience? Are there different versions of the same tale, and why? What are the differences between oral tradition and written tradition? How are these French stories represented in other nations' literature, art and film? Finally, we will briefly chart the rich tradition of Cajun and Creole folklore of present-day South Louisiana, as well as that of French Canada and Haiti. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 317 The Arab-American Experience

This course will examine the assimilation of Arab immigrants within the United States and their unique contribution in creating a rich multicultural society. The course will allow students to learn about the Arab-American community through history, literature and sociology by using creative media tools such as art, music, films and documentaries. In addition, the course will examine political and social stereotypes of Arab-Americans as portrayed in current events. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 318 Italy: From Text to Film

This course will introduce the student to key topics within Italian culture as explored through Italian cinema and literature. Students will analyze narrative devices that tell a story, from the use of various styles of prose in written works to camera angles, editing techniques, and music in film. Through in-class readings of textual and cinematic expressions, including their theoretical background, students will learn to articulate both literary and cinematic criticism. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 320 Latino Writers in the U.S.

The development of Latino literature and culture in the United States, with emphasis on the 20th century. Major writings of Mexican, Cuban, Dominican Republican, Puerto Rican and other Latinos will be analyzed in relation to each group's particular experience and its relation to main stream society. Particular attention given to how gender, race, ethnicity, and class interaction affects the formation of the diverse cultural experience of the U.S. Latino. This course will be taught in English. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 321 Chinese Culture and Civilization

This course covers the development of Chinese civilization from Neolithic times to the present. It examines both the evolution and the continuities of this ancient culture, including aspects of philosophy, religion and ritual, social life, literature, and art. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLG 322 The Latin American Novel

This course focuses on the major works of Latin American writers and their contribution to the literary world. Relevant novels from the 18th to the 20th century literary movements will be analyzed, including topics such as Colonialism, Romanticism, Magic Realism will be analyzed. Several Nobel Prize winners like Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Mario Vargas Llosa and Miguel Angel Asturias will be included, as well as renowned women writers Laura Restrepo, Elena Garro, and Elena Poniatowska among others will be studied. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY

MLT 105 Medical Laboratory Techniques

This course introduces the professional and technical responsibilities of medical laboratory professionals. Topics include phlebotomy, medical terminology, and professional topics such as legal and ethical issues, communication, hospital and laboratory organization, and regulation of educational programs, laboratory facilities, and licensure and certification of laboratory professionals. In the laboratory, phlebotomy techniques are practiced and the routine testing performed in the main areas of laboratory science (Microbiology, Hematology/Coagulation, Immunohematology, Immunology/Serology, Chemistry, and Urinalysis) are explored. Corequisite: MLT 105L Credits: 2 (1,2)

MLT 223 Hematology

The theory component of this course focuses on hematopoiesis and the formed elements of blood under normal and abnormal conditions. The theory and practice of the blood count as a diagnostic tool is presented. In the laboratory setting, technical skills in routine hematology procedures, hemostasis and thrombosis are developed. Automated instruments are used for evaluation of blood specimens. Finger puncture and venipuncture are utilized to obtain specimens for study by manual and automated procedures. The significance of quality control is emphasized and normal and abnormal findings are related to a quality control program. Prerequisite(s): MLT 105, BIO 130 Corequisite: MLT 223L Credits: 4 (3,3)

MLT 227 Immunology and Serology

The theory component of this course includes the study of the body’s immune system, the clinical testing methods used to evaluate immune system function, and the disease processes that are diagnosed through the use of serological methods. The chemical properties and physiological behavior of antigens, immunoglobulins, and complement are considered in detail along with the cellular interactions necessary for proper function of the immune system. The laboratory component of the course focuses on the performance and interpretation of serological diagnostic procedures for a variety of immune disorders and infectious diseases. Prerequisite(s): MLT 105, BIO 130, CHM 152 Corequisite: MLT 227L Credits: 4 (3,2)

MLT 228 Immunohematology Theory

Blood banking theory and practice are integrated in this course. Lecture topics include basic immunology and genetics, ABO, Rh, and other blood group antigens. The significance of human blood groups in transfusion therapy and their association with abnormal clinical conditions and diseases are highlighted. Blood donor selection, collection and preservation and storage of blood products are covered. Transfusion safety and regulatory requirements are discussed. The laboratory components of the course emphasizes the mastery of basic technical skills required for practice in the routine immunohematology laboratory: blood typing, antibody screening, antibody identification, compatability testing and newborn screening. Prerequisite(s): MLT 227 Corequisite(s): MLT 228L Credits: 4 (3,2)

MLT 236 Histological Techniques

This course introduces the basic histological techniques involved in the processing of histology specimens in the anatomic pathology laboratory. The techniques involved in fixation, processing/embedding, microtomy, and staining of laboratory specimens are included. The course is designed as an online theory section accompanied by a ten day full time clinical internship at an off campus affiliated pathology laboratory. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 105 and MLT 223 Credits: 1 (0,0,3)

MLT 243 Clinical Chemistry

This course covers the biochemical analysis of body fluids, with the main focus on serum/plasma constituents. There is an emphasis on the principles of method, analytical procedures, and correlation of data with both abnormal and normal physiological processes for a broad spectrum of available chemistry laboratory tests. The major topics covered in both the laboratory and lecture include carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, bilirubin, non-protein nitrogenous components, electrolytes, and acid base equilibrium. Chemical analyses are performed using manual techniques in the required laboratory portion of the course. Development of technical skills, interpretation and monitoring of quality control, as well as interpretation of patient results are emphasized during the laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 166,CHM 152, 153 and MTH 110 Corequisite(s): MLT 243L Credits: 4 (3,3)

MLT 244 Clinical Practice

A study of routine urinalysis, including renal physiology in normal and abnormal states, with a focus on physical, biochemical, and microscopic findings. Laboratory testing of body fluids is also discussed, including cerebrospinal, synovial, serous, seminal, and amniotic fluids as well as sweat and fecal analysis. Methods and automation in the laboratory are introduced. Topics in special clinical chemistry including endocrinology, therapeutic drug monitoring, and toxicology are also included as part of the course. The required laboratory portion of the course allows for technical development of skills in both body fluids and urinalysis and is configured as a simulated clinical laboratory during the second half of the semester to familiarize the students with the work flow of a typical laboratory setting. Processing of patient specimens, quality assurance, quality control, and communication skills are stressed during the simulated laboratory experience. Prerequisite(s): MLT 223 and MLT 243 Corequisite(s): MLT 244L Credits: 3 (2,3)

MLT 257 Clinical Microbiology I

This course discusses the medically important yeasts and fungi, protozoa and metazoa. In addition, the major groups of bacteria that are emphasized include the Mycobacteria, Rickettsia, Chlamydia and similar organisms. Clinically important human viruses are also covered. Antibiotic testing and treatment of these groups of organisms is included. The laboratory emphasis is on the identification of the protozoa, metazoa, yeast and, fungi. The acid fast stain and specimen concentration for mycobacteria are also performed. In addition, the laboratory covers standard microbiology techniques related to safety in the clinical microbiology laboratory, basic light microscopy, and aseptic technique. Prerequisite(s): MLT 105 Corequisite(s): MLT 257L Credits: 3 (2,3)

MLT 258 Clinical Microbiology II Theory

The principles of general microbiology including cell structure and function, antibiotic action, and microbial growth are discussed. The role of the clinically important bacteria in infectious disease will be explored. The lecture emphasizes the Staphylococci, Streptococci, Neisseria, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas (nonfermenters), Anaerobes, Hemophilus, Brucella, Bordetella, Francisella, Pasteurella, Corynebacterium, Listeria, Erysipelothrix, Bacillus, and miscellaneous bacteria such as the Spirochetes and Spirals. The course emphasizes the identification of microorganisms through biochemical and serological procedures. The major groups covered in the laboratory include the Staphylococci, Enterobacteacieae, Pseudomonas, Anaerobes, and Hemophilus. Each student will receive multiple unknown bacteria to identify. Prerequisite(s): MLT 257 Corequisite(s): MLT 258L Credits: 4 (3,3)

MLT 281 Practicum in Immunohematology

Students practice clinical skills in Immunohematology (Blood Bank) through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 228 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 282 Practicum in Clinical Chemistry and Serology

Students practice clinical skills in Clinical Chemistry and Serology through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 227, 243 and 244 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 283 Practicum in Hematology and Urinalysis

Students practice clinical skills in Hematology and Urinalysis at local affiliated clinical laboratories under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. They are evaluated by the person in charge of their internship for both technical proficiency and professional behavioral characteristics. Prerequisite(s): MLT 223 and 244 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 284 Practicum in Clinical Microbiology

Students practice clinical skills in Microbiology through a ten day full time clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 257 and 258 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 325W Laboratory Management and Informatics (Writing Intensive)

This course presents the principles and practices of quality management in the clinical laboratory, including laboratory administration, supervision, financial and human resource management, safety and problem solving. Regulatory agencies responsible for monitoring laboratory practices will be discussed. Topics will include quality assurance and quality control, implementation of new test methods, equipment evaluation and selection proficiency testing, laboratory inspection procedures, selection, validation and utilization of laboratory information services specific to clinical and research laboratories. Each student will be required to submit a research topic related to clinical laboratory management and informatics. This is a writing intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for MLT 325 and 325W; MLT 325W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Medical Laboratory Technology Department Prerequisite(s): MTH 110 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLT 330 Immunohematology I

Blood banking theory and practice are integrated in this course which provides the foundation for a two course sequence. Topics covered include blood group genetics, blood group characteristics, antigen-antibody reactions and routine pre-transfusion testing. Identification of unexpected antibodies, compatibility and related problem solving strategies are introduced. Perinatal issues and automation in transfusion practices are covered. The required laboratory component of this course emphasizes the development and proficiency of technologist level technical skills that are required for practice in a transfusion medicine facility. Note: the laboratory course, MLT 330L is a part of your grade for this course. Prerequisite: MLT 227, with a grade of C or higher Corequisite: MLT 330L Credits: 4 (3,3)

MLT 340 Clinical Chemistry I

This course covers the biochemical analysis of body fluids, with the main focus on serum/plasma constituents. There is an emphasis on the principles of method, analytical procedures, and correlation of data with both abnormal and normal physiological processes for a broad spectrum of available chemistry laboratory tests. The major topics covered in both the laboratory and lecture include carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, cardiac function, hepatic function, non-protein nitrogenous components, renal function, electrolytes, and acid base equilibrium. Case studies will be used to correlate test results with patient diagnoses, leading to an understanding of the interrelationship between the various laboratory tests performed and the assessment of the patient in health and disease states. Chemical analyses are performed using manual techniques in the required laboratory portion of the course. Development of technical skills, interpretation and monitoring of quality control, as well as interpretation of patient results are emphasized during the laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160, CHM 152, CHM 153, with a grade of C or higher and MTH 110 Credits: 4 (3,3)

MLT 421 Molecular Pathology

This course will provide the student with an overview of the applications of DNA analysis in the diagnostic clinical laboratory. Specific examples of the use of molecular techniques will be included in the areas of oncology, hematology, infectious disease, histocompatibility, coagulation and identification. Specimen collection and handling will be discussed as well as the specific methodology used for each application. New applications will be introduced to the course as they are developed and implemented in clinical laboratory settings. Prerequisite(s): BIO 441 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLT 423 Advanced Hematology

This course presents advanced hematology principles and techniques in preparation for practice in the clinical laboratory setting. A case study theoretical approach and laboratory experiences that facilitate the identification of abnormal cellular elements, including the pathophysiology of hematology related disorders, will be emphasized. In the laboratory, students will apply quality practices and use both manual and automated technologies to correlate specimen results with hematology disorders. Prerequisite(s): MLT 223 Corequisite(s): 423L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MLT 425 Laboratory Research and Education

This course presents the principles and practices of applied research design, education, and training for clinical laboratory technologists. Research designs, sampling methodologies, collection and analysis of data in the research process will be discussed. Topics related to education include the domains and levels of learning, constructing behavioral objectives, learning outcomes, and clinical training strategies. Strategies for effective communication in the clinical laboratory workplace will also be discussed. Each student will be required to design an applied research study on a topic related to clinical laboratory science. Prerequisite(s): MLT 325 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLT 428 Advanced Immunohematology

This course presents advanced immunohematology principles and techniques in preparation for practice in the clinical blood bank laboratory. Case study analysis will be used to formulate approaches to solving complex serologic problems. Lecture topics to be discussed include blood group systems, antibody identification techniques, blood donor collection practices, compatibility and investigation of transfusion reactions. Blood bank quality management, ethical and legal issues and alternative technologies in blood banking will be covered. In the laboratory setting, students will use both manual and automated techniques to perform pretransfusion testing and resolve serologic problems. Proficiency in routine blood bank procedures is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): MLT 228 Corequisite(s): MLT 428L Credits: 3 (2,2)

MLT 443 Clinical Pathophysiology

The theoretical concepts introduced in the Clinical Chemistry, Immunology/Serology, and Clinical Practice courses will be expanded through a problem solving approach. Case studies will be used to correlate test results with patient diagnoses, leading to an understanding of the interrelationship between the various areas of laboratory testing and the assessment of the patient in health and disease. The use of clinical correlation as a quality assurance tool to detect patient testing errors will be included. New concepts introduced will include enzyme kinetics, therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology, vitamins, porphyrins, endocrinology, and genetic disorders. Prerequisite(s): MLT 227, 243 and 244 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLT 458 Advanced Clinical Microbiology

This course will use a problem solving approach to build upon the theoretical concepts introduced in Clinical Microbiology I and II. Case studies will be used to correlate laboratory and clinical information related to infectious diseases. Bacteria, parasites, fungi, and viruses that are less commonly encountered in the clinical laboratory will be discussed, along with the specialized techniques for their identification. Emerging pathogens and diagnostic techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): MLT 257 and 258 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MLT 481 Advanced Practicum in Immunohematology

Students practice advanced clinical skills in Immunohematology (Blood Bank) through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 428 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 482 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Chemistry and Hematology

Students practice advanced clinical skills in Clinical Chemistry and Hematology through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 423 and 443 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 483 Practicum in Molecular Pathology

Students practice clinical skills in Molecular Pathology through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 421 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MLT 484 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Microbiology

Students practice advanced clinical skills in Microbiology through a ten day clinical internship at an off campus affiliated clinical laboratory under the guidance of clinical laboratory personnel. The clinical coordinators at the affiliated sites will evaluate students for both technical proficiency and professional behavior demonstrated during the internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical location. Prerequisite(s): MLT 458 Credits: 1 (0,3)

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics Placement Level (MP1, MP2, MP3, and MP4) is determined by the scores of high school math courses and/or Regents Exams, or the score on the placement exam. Further information can be found under Placement Testing for English and Mathematics.

MTH 015 Elements of Algebra

This course fulfills the elementary algebra requirement for entrance into many programs at the College. Topics include numeric and algebraic operations, solutions of linear equations and inequalities, graphs and equations of lines, systems of linear equations, polynomial operations, factoring, and solution of quadratic equations. The minimum passing grade is C-. Grade will not be computed into GPA. Credits: 4 NCU (non-credit units) (4,0)

MTH 102 Elementary Discrete Mathematical Models

An introduction to Discrete Mathematical Models that utilize topics including Matrix Algebra, Linear Programming, the Simplex Method, the Method of Least Squares, Markov Chains, Game Theory and Exponential Growth. Models include the Leontief Input-Output Model, the Transportation Problem, Finance Investment Strategies, Management Decisions and Campaign Strategies. The course makes use of computer software such as the spreadsheet software EXCEL and the TI-86 graphing calculator or equivalent. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 103 Sets, Probability and Logic

This course uses set theory to develop the basic concepts of finite probability. The student is introduced to the tree and to the counting methods of devising sample spaces. The probability of mutually exclusive events, dependent and independent events are treated. Some applications to probability distributions of discrete variables are included. Finally, the basic topics in symbolic logic are covered. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 107 Introduction to Mathematical Ideas

A survey of contemporary topics in mathematics designed to develop an appreciation of the power and significance of mathematics and its uses in modeling the world around us. Topics may include the mathematics of social choice, growth and symmetry, mathematical systems, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, management science. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 110 Statistics

Basic concepts of probability and statistical inference. Included are the binominal, normal, and chi-square distributions. Practical applications are examined. Computer assignments using Minitab form an integral part of the course. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 116 College Algebra

This course is designed to provide students with a firm foundation in symbolic manipulation and algebraic reasoning. Both manipulative skills and conceptual understanding of algebraic principles are stressed. Topics include equivalent expressions and equations, linear functions, properties of exponents and logarithms, quadratic equations, power functions, exponential functions. Upon completion of this course students will be prepared for precalculus as well as for quantitative courses in the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite(s): MP2 or MTH 015 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 117 Precalculus Modeling for the Life and Social Sciences

MTH 117 is a precalculus course for students who are not majoring in the technologies. This course uses linear, exponential logarithmic, power, polynomial, and trigonometric functions to model real world problems. The important characteristics and properties of these functions are investigated. The emphasis is on applications and problem solving. A graphing calculator is required. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for MTH 129. Prerequisite(s): MP3 or MTH 116 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 129 Precalculus with Applications

This is a precalculus course with applications from various disciplines including technology, science, and business. Topics include families of functions, mechanics of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and complex numbers. The emphasis is on applications and problem solving. A graphing calculator is required. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for MTH 117. Prerequisite(s): MP3 or MTH 116 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 130 Calculus I with Applications

This is a calculus course for those not majoring in Mathematics, Engineering Science or Computer Science. Topics include the derivative, differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications of the derivative and the definite integral. Applications are taken from technology, science, and business. Problem solving is stressed. A graphing calculator is required. Note: Students completing this course will not receive credit for MTH 150. Prerequisite(s): MP4 or MTH 117 or 129 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 150 Calculus I

This is the first course of the calculus sequence. Topics include, differentiation of functions of one variable, introduction to integration, application of differentiation and integration. A graphing calculator is required. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for MTH 130. Prerequisite(s): MP4 or MTH 117 or 129 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 151 Calculus II

A continuation of the calculus of one variable. Topics include, differentiation and integration of the transcendental functions, integration techniques, polar coordinates and infinite series. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130 or MTH 150 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 236 Calculus II with Applications

A continuation of Calculus I with Applications. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, multivariable calculus, and an introduction to Differential Equations. Applications are taken from technology, science and business. Problem solving is emphasized. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130 or MTH 150 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 245 Linear Algebra

A study of the basic properties of vectors and vector spaces; linear transformations and matrices; matrix representations of transformations; characteristic values and characteristic vectors of linear transformations; similarity of matrices, selected applications. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 246 Introduction to Financial Mathematics

This is a course designed to introduce concepts in financial markets; present and future value calculations of money related to loans, annuities, and bonds. It also introduces simple but basic no-arbitrage derivations of the prices of the most financial contracts that are traded either on exchanges or over-the-counter (stocks, options and forward contracts) in a single and multi-period asset pricing setting. Students will analyze the valuation and hedging of European and American options and general contingent claims in the framework of the classical binomial model of the stock price. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 250 Graph Theory and Combinatorics

An introductory to graph theory and combinatorial analysis. The emphasis is on problem solving and applications with some attention to theorems and proofs. Topics include Graph Models, Isomorphism, Planar Graphs, Circuits and Graph coloring, Trees, Minimal Spanning Trees, Arrangements and selections, Generating Functions and Inclusion/Exclusion. Prerequisite(s): MTH 150 Corequisite(s): MTH 245 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 252 Calculus III

This is the third course of the calculus sequence. It generalizes single variable calculus to multivariable calculus. Functions of several variables are described numerically, graphically and algebraically. Topics include: partial differentiation, multiple integration, vectors and vector fields and line integrals. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 253 Differential Equations

This is an introductory course in ordinary Differential Equations designed to develop an understanding of the qualitative behavior of solutions and its relation to the process being modeled. Use of appropriate computer packages forms an integral part of the course. Topics include: first order differential equations and systems, linear systems, applications including electrical circuits and vibrations, introduction to Laplace Transform. Prerequisite(s): MTH 252 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 270 Introduction to Mathematical Computing

This course is an introduction to computational, experimental, and algorithmic methods using a computer algebra system. Course topics include computational algebra, functional programming, simulation, and visualization. Numerical calculus, analysis of mathematical models and dynamics, basic linear algebra, and other mathematical problem-solving methods will be discussed. At the completion of the course, students will be familiar with a computer algebra system and how to solve mathematical problems by computational methods. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 with a grade of C or higher or permission of the Mathetmatics Department Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 290 Methods of Proof in Advanced Mathematics

MTH 290 is intended to be a bridge course from lower-division mathematics courses to upper-division mathematics. Topics include Logic and Proofs, Set Theory, Relations, Functions (Onto, One-to-One, Sequences as Functions), Cardinality, Introduction to Algebraic Structures, and Introduction to Concepts of Analysis. The focus will be on writing clear and precise proofs. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 315W History of Mathematics (Writing Intensive)

An investigation of the development of mathematics from ancient times to the present. Students will study topics which may include ancient mathematics (in particular, the Pythagorean Theorem and quadratic equations), Greek mathematics (Aristotle, Euclid, Archimedes, Apollonius, Ptolemy and Diophantus), medieval mathematics (China, India, Islam, Europe, America, and Africa), early modern mathematics (logarithms, analytic geometry, probability and the beginning of calculus), and modern mathematics (analysis, probability, number theory, abstract algebra linear algebra, non- Euclidean geometries, set theory, and topology). Each topic will be examined in the context of and why it was further developed. A vital component of the course will be a study of the mathematicians who provided us with these tools which are an integral part of mathematical applications in today's world. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot get credit for MTH 315 and 315W; MTH 315W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Applied Mathematics Department Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher and MTH 151 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 320 Geometric Structures

An axiomatic view of Euclidean and non-Euclidian geometry. The standard models of the various geometries will be constructed. Careful emphasis on proof construction and understanding. Applications of Euclidean and Hyperbolic geometries will be given. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 322 Advanced Mathematical Analysis

Topics include: infinite series, first and second order differential equations and applications, homogeneous and forced response, Laplace transforms, Taylor series, matrices, Gauss-Elimination method. Prerequisite(s): MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 325 Mathematical Modeling in the Biological Sciences

The course will focus on mathematical models in biology, including topics such as the growth of populations, the interactions between different populations, the spread of epidemics, the Hardy-Weinberg law in genetics and drug levels in the bloodstream. The emphasis will be on determining the mathematical component of a phenomenon, creating an appropriate mathematical model, using the model to answer questions about the situation, and interpreting the effectiveness of the model. Technology will be used as an exploratory tool. Prerequisite(s): One semester of biology and MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 4 (4,0)

MTH 326 Mathematical Modeling in Applied Sciences

This course will investigate various mathematical models in the applied sciences taken from real life phenomena. Basic notions of abstraction and how to work on real problems at different levels will be introduced in the course. The Models are explored using analytical, computational and graphical tools as appropriate. Models cover but are not limited to examples from Finance, Economics, Ecology, the Environment, Engineering, Biology and Behavioral Sciences. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 330 Applied Abstract Algebra

Essential structures of modern algebra: sets, relations, groups, homomorphisms, and rings will be studied with a view toward their applicability. Applications may include error correcting codes, computational complexity, and counting problems. Prerequisite(s): MTH 245 and MTH 290 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 331 Introduction to Topology

This course introduces the basic concepts and some fundamental results of Point Set Topology. Some of the topics covered are: Open sets and the notion of continuity on various fundamental spaces (the real line, Euclidean spaces, metric spaces, and general topological spaces); connectedness, compactness, countability, and separation; the Tychonoff theorem. Prerequisite(s): MTH 252 and MTH 290 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 346 Continuous Time Finance

This course introduces Brownian motion, Stochastic Calculus, Ito's integral and Ito's formula which are used to derive the Black-Scholes formula in a continuous-time model rather than a limit of discrete-time models as covered in MTH 246. Pricing derivatives on financial securities using Black-Scholes formula will be covered. Prerequisite(s): MTH 246 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 354 Principles of Real Analysis

Students will be introduced to the foundations of real analysis through a rigorous development of the real number system. This will be followed by a study of limits, continuity, and differentiability of real functions. The Riemann integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus will be developed rigorously. Sequences and series of real functions will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): MTH 252 and MTH 290 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 355 Principles of Complex Analysis

This course will concentrate on the algebraic and analytic properties of complex numbers and functions of a single complex variables. The concepts of limits, continuity and differentiability will be extended to the complex domain. Line integrals and Cauchy's Integral Theorem will be presented. The expansion of analytic functions in Taylor and Laurent series will be derived and residue theory will be introduced. Prerequisite(s): MTH 252 and MTH 290 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 356 Integrated Topics in Math and Physics

This is an integrated math-physics course with applications to topics in physics and the engineering technologies. It is meant to be interdisciplinary in nature and directed toward students in the Bachelor of Technology and Applied Mathematics programs. Topics to be covered include: Vector Algebra, Vector Calculus, Scalar and Vector Field Theory, Fourier Series, Fourier Integral, Fourier Transforms and Laplace Transforms. The focus will be on application and integration of mathematics methods to physics and engineering technologies. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for PHY 356. Prerequisite(s): MTH 236 or MTH 252 and PHY 136 or PHY 144 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 360 Applied Probability and Statistics

A calculus-based course which studies applications of probability and statistical inference. Use of appropriate computer packages forms an integral part of the course. Topics are chosen from statistical parameters, continuous and discrete random variables, probability distributions, correlation and regression analysis, design of experiments and ANOVA. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 or MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 365 Vector Calculus

The course begins with a detailed development of vector algebra in two- and three- dimensions. Also covered will be differentiation and integration of scalar and vector valued functions of vectors. Vector fields will be discussed with particular attention to line and surface integrals. Important vector theorems such as Green's, Stokes' and the divergence theorem and their important applications will be presented. A discussion of the Fourier series and the Fourier integral will complete the course. Prerequisite(s): MTH 245 and MTH 252 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 385 Applied Partial Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to partial differential equations. Topics include introduction to heat, wave, and Laplace equations, Fourier series, numerical methods, applications. Use of an appropriate computer packages is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite(s): MTH 253 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 390 Methods in Operations Research

This course is intended to focus on understanding, formulating and solving deterministic models in operations research. Maximum and Minimum Linear Programming problems will be studied graphically and theoretically. The Simplex Method, Sensitivity Analysis and Duality will be covered and an in-depth analysis of the reasoning on which these topics are based will be given. Instruction in computer software techniques will be presented to solve Linear Programming problems, using the simplex method and sensitivity analysis. Transportation Problems, Integer Programming, or Markov Chains will be covered. In order to enhance quantitative reasoning, the course emphasizes the formulation of mathematical models commonly used by operation research analysts, as well as the theoretical and computer software solutions to these models. Prerequisite(s): MTH 130 or MTH 150 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 400 Problem Solving Seminar

This is a seminar course where students will work on a variety of non-routine problems chosen by the instructor and present their solutions (or partial solutions). Students will also work on a major research project under the guidance of the instructor and will report their results. Cooperative work will be encouraged and much of the work will be of an "open ended" nature. Communications skills will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): MTH 252 or MTH 245 or MTH 250 or MTH 253 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 405 Seminar in Applied Mathematics

This is a capstone course for Applied Mathematics students. Students will work on a major project taken from business, industry or government agency. Students will have to present their results both orally and in writing. The completed report must meet a standard that is acceptable to the business community. Students may work in teams or individually. They will report on their progress as part of the seminar. This course may be taken twice for academic credit. Prerequisite(s): MTH 354 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 422 Numerical Methods

This is an introductory elective course for Applied Mathematics students. Topics include solutions of nonlinear equations, interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical differentiation and integration, iterative techniques in Linear Algebra and others. Solutions of problems using computer will be an integral part of this course. Prerequisite(s): MTH 151 and MTH 245 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 445 Linear Algebra II

This course is a continuation of MTH245. Topics include further study of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; inner product spaces, orthogonality, least squares problems, symmetric matrices, diagonalization, quadratic forms and the singular value decomposition. Applications to Markov chains, constrained optimization, differential equations, statistics, and image processing, among others, will be shown. Prerequisite(s): MTH 245 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 460 Applied Probability and Statistics II

A continuation of MTH 360. Topics chosen from hypothesis testing; sampling distributions; analysis of variance and covariance; nonparametric techniques; probability distributions; multivariate techniques. Prerequisite(s): MTH 360 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MTH 490 Topics in Applied Mathematics

Lectures in applied mathematics that may introduce topics not covered in the Applied Mathematics curriculum or may expand upon the content of existing courses. These topics vary from year to year, and the specific description of the content of each course will be publicized in advance by the department. Examples of such topics are computational linear algebra, applied optimization, dynamical modeling, financial mathematics, etc. Prerequisite(s): MTH 245 and MTH 252 Credits: 3 (3,0)

MUSIC

MUS 108 Survey of Western Music

This course will introduce students to music from Ancient Greek times to present. The course will also allow students to appreciate music in relation to the other arts, to other cultures, and to historical events. Credits: 3 (3,0)

NURSING

NUR 094 NYS PN/RN Transition

This course is designed to validate prior learning, and update/enhance the student's knowledge. This course facilitates transition from the role of Practical Nurse to that of a student preparing for the role of Registered Nurse. Nursing process is used as the framework for critical thinking and problem solving. Students holding and/ or eligible to hold a current registration in a United States Jurisdiction may take this non-credit course. The amount of work required is equivalent to a course bearing 3 credits. For progression into the Registered Nurse program, the student must hold a current LPN registration in a US Jurisdiction and meet the specific requirements of the institution and/or to which s/he is applying. Credits: 3 NCU (non-credit units) (3,0)

NUR 095 Clinical Skills Update

A mandatory 30 hour non-credit unit course for nursing students who have interrupted their nursing study. Instruction will be provided in the lab and clinic area. Non-credit units/offered Intersession and Summer. Course grade will not be computed in GPA. Credits: 1 NCU (non-credit units) (0,2)

NUR 100 Health Assessment

This course will enable students to acquire skill in obtaining a health history and in performing physical examinations. Emphasis will be on identification of normal physical characteristics, common variations, and beginning skills in detecting deviations from normal. Students are given the opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in the nursing laboratory, and apply these skills to the clinical setting to provide holistic care to individuals and families. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171 with a grade of B or higher Corequisite(s): NUR 100L and NUR 114T, NUR 114L, NUR 114H, NUR 114S Credits: 3 (2,3)

NUR 110 Foundations of Nursing I

In foundations of Nursing I students begin their professional socialization into the discipline of nursing. Foundations of Nursing I introduces basic underpinnings of nursing practice. It provides an overview of nursing as a discipline and addresses such topics as historical roots, the domains of nursing, and the care/cure paradigm, and social and educational perspectives of nursing. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Credits: 1 (1,0)

NUR 111 Foundations of Nursing II

In Foundations of Nursing II students will continues to build on ideas introduced in Foundations of Nursing I in order to establish their identity with the nursing profession. The profession of nursing will be explored from a variety of viewpoints. Concepts of professionalism; roles, and attributes needed to practice nursing competently will be explored. A personal philosophy of nursing and nursing practice will be developed. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 110 with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 1 (1,0)

NUR 114 Clinical and Theoretical Foundations of Baccalaureate Nursing Practice

This course provides an introduction to nursing and patient care concepts, emphasizing the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to provide safe, high quality care to individuals, families and communities within a multicultural environment. The theoretical foundation for professional nursing behaviors, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care are explored within the context of various health care environments, delivery systems, and inter-disciplinary teams. Concepts of caring, critical thinking, communication, and the role of the professional nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member of a profession are integrated throughout the course as a framework for presentation of the essential components of generalist baccalaureate nursing practice. Students are given the opportunity to demonstrate beginning skills in the nursing and simulation laboratory, and apply these skills in the clinical setting to provide holistic care that promotes optimum wellbeing to individuals and families. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170, 171 Corequisite(s): NUR 114H, 114L, 114S, NUR 100, 100L Credits: 7 (2,5,12)

NUR 150 Medication Dosage Calculation

This course is designed to provide students with the requisite knowledge and skills to accurately calculate medication dosages. Fundamental formulas will be taught, as well as the theoretical and mathematical concepts related to the administration of oral and parenteral medications. Credits: 1 (1,0)

NUR 211 Clinical Pharmacology for Nursing

This course provides a foundation of basic pharmacology necessary for a nurse in general practice to establish a knowledge base that applies to patient centered care and education. Emphasis is placed on pharmacological concepts that build upon knowledge from the sciences to promote optimal well-being across the lifespan. Pharmacotherapeutic agents used to treat illness, and promote, maintain, and restore wellness are discussed in the context of evidence-based research, clinical judgment, and decision making. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): BIO 170 and BIO 171 with a grade of B or higher and NUR 114 with a grade of C+ or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 215W Developing Nurses’ Ways of Knowing (Writing Intensive)

This course presents an overview of nursing as a professional, scholarly discipline, which is an essential part of healthcare. Topics discussed include ways of knowing in nursing, specifically theoretical/empirical, ethical, personal, esthetic, intuitive, and sociopolitical knowing. There is also emphasis on developing ideas about related topics such as historical and social factors, reflective practice, nursing concepts, learning, nursing theory, skills acquisition, and evidence for practice that provide foundations for current professional nursing practice. This is a writing intensive course. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Note: Students cannot get credit for NUR 215 and 215W; NUR 215W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Nursing Department Prerequisite(s): NUR 111 and EGL 101 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 216 The Art of Nursing

This course explores the artistry of professional nursing. The theories of caring, the importance of self-care, the mind-body connection, and the value of the nurse’s presence in today’s healthcare system will be explored. The concepts of self-care assessment and intervention will be practiced through reflection and dialogue within an environment of supportive peers and faculty. Other concepts including mindfulness, movement, and personal creativity will be discussed. The evidence supporting the use of therapeutic modalities such as humor, music, and touch will be evaluated for inclusion in a nursing plan of care. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Corequisite(s): NUR 110 Credits: 2 (2,0)

NUR 217 Care of Individuals Experiencing Acute Health Challenges

This course focuses on the experiences of individuals/families with acute health challenges within a multicultural society. The student will be introduced to concepts and skills common in the care of patients with acute health challenges. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and clinical decision making. The student will examine essential concepts and issues related to acute health challenges from different viewpoints. Throughout this course the student continues to develop self-awareness, professionalism, and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to practice nursing in a caring, non-judgmental manner in an increasingly complex health care system. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. To continue in the nursing program, the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 100, NUR 110, NUR 114 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 217H Credits: 6 (3,0,9)

NUR 240 Nursing Beyond Borders

This three credit elective course will provide an overview on a number of topics related to global health in today's world. Topics will include essential concepts related to providing compassionate care to clients from different cultures, health care access from a global perspective, prevention of disease and the maintenance of health. Any 100 level clinical course in dental hygiene, nursing, or medical laboratory technology or other related health professions. Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 301 Community Nursing

This course focuses on the role of the nurse in the community working with individuals, families, groups and high risk populations in a variety of community settings. Caring for individuals across the lifespan including their families and the communities in which they live is emphasized recognizing physical, psychological, behavioral, social, and cultural needs. Evidence-based clinical concepts are incorporated as a basis for providing interventions for families and groups with multiple and complex health stressors within a population/public health framework. This course is for RN Completion Students. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 215 and NUR 216 with a grade of C+ or higher Corequisite(s): NUR 301H Credits: 4 (2,0,6)

NUR 302 Pathophysiology

In this course students will examine normal body structure and function as well as concepts related to physiologic deviations that contribute to disease or that occur as a result of a disease, incorporating knowledge from the sciences as a foundation for provision of holistic, patient-centered care. Physiologic changes in body systems that lead to health problems across the lifespan will be addressed in the context of evidence-based research and clinical decision making. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77 %) or better in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 217 with a grade of C+ or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 305 Health Promotion and Patient Education

This course combines the critical review of health promotion strategies and the framework for designing successful patient teaching tools. Students will be introduced to the major concepts of health promotion and the issues that impact upon health and wellness. In order to better understand the global impact of health upon our society, students will research various agencies that support health promotion and review their health care agendas. The second component of the course will be an introduction to the role of the nurse as an educator and the identification of barriers to learning will be explored. Methods to develop effective evidenced based teaching plans will also be covered. To continue in the nursing department you must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 215W and NUR 216 with a grade of C+ or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 306 Care of Individual Chronic Health

This course focuses on the experiences of individuals/families with chronic health challenges within a multicultural society. The student will be introduced to concepts and skills common in the care of patients with chronic health challenges. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and clinical decision making. The student will examine essential concepts and issues related to chronic health challenges from different viewpoints. Throughout this course the student continues to develop self-awareness, professionalism, and the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to practice nursing in a caring, non-judgmental manner in an increasingly complex health care system. Opportunities for application of these concepts are provided in various health care settings. To continue in the program a student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 307 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 306H Credits: 6 (3,0,9)

NUR 307 Nursing Care of Children and the Child Bearing Family

This course builds on the concepts of previous courses with emphasis on the application of the nursing process and the development of critical thinking skills in focusing on health during the childbearing years, ante partum, postpartum, and the health of infants and children through adolescence. Students will explore the concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, evidence based health practice, and alterations in health related to patients and families. Emphasis is on common health issues related to maternal newborn and pediatric specific content. Nursing management and planning will include concepts from culturally diverse settings. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 215W, NUR 216, and NUR 217 with a grade of C+ or higher. Corequisite(s): NUR 307H Credits: 6 (3,0,9)

NUR 401 Modes of Inquiry in Nursing

This course introduces the student to a comprehensive overview of the nursing research process. Research methods, including qualitative and quantitative approaches, will be examined. Knowledge and skills essential for understanding, interpreting, analyzing, and applying nursing research to clinical practice will be stressed. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): Any 300 level nursing course. Corequisite(s): MTH 110 Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 402 Community and Mental Health Nursing

This course focuses on both mental health and illness concepts and the role of the nurse in the community working with individuals, families, groups and high risk populations in a variety of community settings. Caring for individuals across the lifespan including their families and the communities in which they live is emphasized recognizing physical, psychological, behavioral, social, and cultural needs. Evidence-based nursing research concepts are incorporated as a basis for community/public health and mental health nursing practice. These concepts focus on individuals and groups with multiple and complex health stressors that exhibit maladaptive patterns and psychiatric disorders. Resources within the global community mental health system are identified. This course is for pre-licensure students. To continue in the nursing program, the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 306 Corequisite(s): NUR 402H Credits: 4 (2,0,6)

NUR 404 Nurse as Advocate and Change Agent

This course will enable students to synthesize new knowledge and develop a personal perspective on their future professional career in nursing. The current health care environment demands a nursing workforce that is theoretically sound, clinically adept, and politically aware. Topics to be discussed and explored include patient advocacy, political awareness and influence, power and oppression, institutional policy/personal goals, risk management, utilization and audit, and quality assurance. Additional topics may be added in response to new or emerging trends in nursing and health care. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 401 Credits: 3 (3,0)

NUR 405 Nursing Practicum: Special Topics

This course will allow the senior nursing student, under direct supervision of an experienced clinician, to integrate and apply knowledge from all previous courses to assess, plan, implement and evaluate care of multiple patients in an area of special interest. A one hour weekly dialogue and reflection will allow students to synthesize and further construct the knowledge and understanding needed to function effectively in today's healthcare environment. Additional opportunities in clinical practice as well as the identification of a healthcare management problem will be the core content of this course. The student will be required to work his/her preceptor's schedule. This course is for Generic BS Students. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 402 and 404 Corequisite(s): NUR 405H Credits: 9 (1,0,24)

NUR 406 Senior Leadership Practicum

This 5 credit clinical preceptor course will provide a capstone leadership experience for licensed registered nurses enrolled in our Baccalaureate Completion track in Nursing. Students will spend a total of 120 hours working side by side an experienced clinician functioning in a leadership role. Students will identify an area of interest and appropriate goals and objectives for the learning experience. The course will connect theory to practice allowing students to make the connection between the concepts of nurse as change agents and nursing leadership. The course will include one hour of dialogue and reflection weekly. This course if for RN Completion Students. To continue in the nursing program the student must maintain a grade of C+ (77) or higher in this course. Prerequisite(s): NUR 404 Credits: 5 (1,0,8)

PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS

PCM 226 Journalism

An introduction to practical journalism in which students write news and feature stories, editorials, and reviews, and examine techniques of newspaper design and photography. Classes include readings and discussions in the theory of mass communications. Student materials may be printed in campus publications. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for EGL 226. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 301 Advanced Grammar and Vocabulary

Students will master a study of descriptive and prescriptive English grammar and will become familiar with concepts of linguistics and semiology. Students will expand their vocabulary by learning the use of a broad range of words and by understanding their etymological roots, their appropriateness to situation and audience, and their function in smooth syntax. Students will develop skills leading to the use of precise, concise prose style. Mastery of grammar, vocabulary and style is essential to professional-level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and editing. Students completing this course may not receive credit for EGL 301. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 305 Media in Communications

Students will apply the Microsoft Office skills which they have acquired to the creation of a number of real world professional communication documents and presentations. Students in the Professional Communications program must use Office applications effectively, carefully considering the purpose, function, audience, and venue of individual projects. This upper division course provides a range of assignments that reflect real world writing and speaking projects. Prerequisite(s) required or approval from this department chair. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 and BCS 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 311 Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media

Introduction to Writing for Electronic Media will give students an overview of the issues concerning electronic media, including legal and ethical concerns. Students will learn how to write for electronic media in hands-on training in the school's computer labs using industry-standard programs. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for EGL 311. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 313W Communications Theory (Writing Intensive)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the complete process of professional communication from clarification of the problem to the presentation to the final product. The elements of communication theory are covered, as well as the criteria by which to judge the adequacies of existing theories and the techniques for developing new ones. Students will have the opportunity to work with actual communications issues within industry and present their findings in a written, oral, or visual format. This is a writing-intensive course. Note: Students cannot earn credit for PCM 313 and 313W; PCM 313W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 315 Research Techniques

In this course students are introduced to information science, bibliographic practices, and research methods appropriate to finding, evaluating, and incorporating into documents both online and hard copy data and graphics. Students complete several research projects. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 320 Communications in Business I

In this course students learn to compose business documents including correspondence, directives, proposals, persuasive and informative memos, and researched, analytical reports. The course emphasizes electronic research as well as professional prose style, oral presentation, and page formatting. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 324 Report Writing and Technical Communications

A practicum in which students produce a variety of business oriented and technical documents. This course provides students with a survey of current practices and techniques appropriate to writing for forums, especially for technical journals, newspapers, and magazines. It is also designed to make students proficient at writing professional articles and reports such as new product information sheets, technical correspondence, periodic reports, summaries, process and technical descriptions, instructions and analysis, and to allow students to incorporate graphs, tables and other illustrative matter with textual content. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 325 Writing in Health and Disease

Students will develop skill in articulating oral and written health information for multiple audiences. The course emphasizes how to interpret medical studies, how to think critically about ethical issues in the health sciences, and how to assess communication problems between medical professionals and the communities they serve. Nutritional guidelines and food politics also are explored in depth. Using appropriate research methods, students will practice several expository forms common in health professions, such as patient instructions and articles. Students also will write a personal essay and public service announcement. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 326 Sport Writing

In this course students will learn skills in the identification of legitimate angles for sport stories, how to report sport events, develop sport feature stories, and write sport opinion pieces, both for print publication and the web. Students will submit written articles, be required to write on deadline, and develop skills on interviewing. Students will deconstruct published stories and acquire an understanding of the process of assembling a well researched and expertly crafted sport story. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for SMT 326. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 328 Advanced Writing and Editing

In this course, students develop clean, concise, and precise prose style and master the use of professional symbols and techniques of editing in both hard copy and electronic formats. Students develop these skills in their own writing projects, those of fellow students, and those of other amateur and professional writers. This course includes the study of research, citation, and bibliographic formats for print and electronic sources. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 329 Legal Writing and Analysis

PCM 329 is a course in which the student will learn the skills necessary to produce legal writing and analysis. Students will study current practices and contemporary models of legal writing, as well as legal research and the legal system. Students will compose various documents for discussion, review, and revision. A research project/appellate brief is required, which will include an oral presentation to the class. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 330 Journalism II

In this course students will learn the many skills necessary in the publication of the newspaper. They will accept written articles, do edits, use the necessary software in producing the pages, write headlines, create formats, include photographs and other illustrations, design and organize the entire paper, learn about the costs involved in the printing and distributing a newspaper. Prerequisite(s): PCM 320 or PCM 226 or PCM 324 or EGL 226 Credits: 3 (2,2)

PCM 331 Advanced Oral Communications

This course is designed to develop effective and professional communication in the areas of communication theory, advanced presentation skills, and voice and diction. A major component of the course provides students with a personalized voice and diction diagnostic profile which informs each student of specific speech characteristics they present that deviate from Standard Eastern Dialect. Particular attention is given to New York Regional Dialect and foreign accent reduction. The course also introduces various theoretical systems of communication. There is a strong focus on the development and effective application of presentational skills in both public and group/team environments with an emphasis on professional settings. All aspects of the course contain written components which include student readings and reports as well as comprehensive speech outlines. Note: Students taking this course cannot receive credit for SPE 331. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 332 Journalism III

Students will learn all aspects of putting a newspaper together including writing headlines, layout and production. Students are expected to produce four issues of The Rambler. This class will give students real life experience of publishing a paper and meeting deadlines and using InDesign software. Students are expected to take photos and are required to have access to a camera. Cell phone photos will not be accepted. This class will be incorporating the on-line newspaper the Rampage and adding to it for a print edition which is The Rambler. Those editions would include columns, op-ed pieces, profiles, etc. Prerequisite(s): EGL 226 or PCM 226 or PCM 320 or PCM 324 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 341 Special Topics: PCM

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 343 Special Topics in Professional Communications

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 344 Special Topics in Professional Communications

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 345 Special Topics: PCM

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 346 Special Topics: PCM

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 347 Special Topics: PCM

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 348 Special Topics

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 349 Special Topics

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 350 Special Topics

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 351 Special Topics

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 352 Special Topics in Professional Communications

Courses that range from 341-352 are special topics courses. Students will learn the skills necessary to write in a particular genre or type required in a particular career setting. Students will study current practices and contemporary models and will compose several thoroughly researched documents in this genre for discussion, review, and revision. An accompanying text may provide both general and detailed guidelines. A lengthy composition will be required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 420 Advanced Technical Communications

Students learn advanced techniques in composing reports, technical papers, oral presentations, business communication, and press releases. Students evaluate classical and contemporary theories of rhetoric and apply them to their own writing as well as the writing of others. Prerequisite(s): PCM 342 or EGL 310 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 425 Documentation Procedures

Students learn to write instructions and explain processes in professional documents. They review style, editing, desktop publishing skills, and the overarching importance of attention to audience, purpose, and task. Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair or PCM 328 and VIS 242. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 426 Culture and Communication

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the various ways culture and communications are interrelated. Specifically, the course is designed to help students become more effective communicators in the multi-cultural world in which they live and work. To achieve this goal, students will study various theories about the relationship between culture and communication and apply these theories to solving real world problems that they may confront in communicating with people from other cultures. Prerequisite(s): One Sociology course, and 300 Level PCM Course or EGL 216 or EGL 102, or Permission of the Chair. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 428 Grant Writing

This course is an intensive study designed to provide a complete overview of the grant writing process. Students will learn to research funding sources, write proposals, and negotiate with funding sources. Required assignments include searching for funding agencies, using various courses, and working in groups to complete a sample grant proposal. Students will locate funding sources and complete a grant proposal. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 and 102 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PCM 450 Internship-Technology Communication

This course is an internship in a business, civic, educational, government, or not-for-profit organization. Students participate by using their communication skills in real world situations. Prerequisite(s): Upper division standing or permission of department chair. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

PCM 460 Internship II

Students will work in another off-campus organization. They will complete 90 hours of work on site, confer with their on-site supervisor and campus academic supervisor at regular intervals, and complete a portfolio illustrating responsibilities they completed in their on site location. Prerequisite(s): PCM 450 Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED 100 Introduction to Badminton

This course is designed to teach the student the fundamental skills necessary to play the game of Badminton correctly. It will stress the various shots needed, i.e. the forehand and backhand drive, clear smash and drop shot. It will also concentrate on the history, rules and etiquette of badminton. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 115 Introduction to Self Defense

This course is designed to teach students the history of Self Defense. The basic skills needed in defending oneself against attack will be taught. Some forms of Karate and Judo will be included. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 119 Introduction to Tennis

This course is designed to teach a beginning Tennis player the fundamental skills of the game; stressing the forehand and backhand serve and volley strokes. It will also cover history, scoring, rules, terminology, etiquette and strategy. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 121 Introduction to Weight Training and Fitness

This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop weight training skills and techniques. This course is designed for students who are interested in physical fitness and will require weight training workouts during class time. We will discuss training safety and learn how to set up a personalized training program for another student. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 125 Introduction to Racquetball

This class is designed to teach the basic skills, fundamentals, rules, strategies, and techniques required to play the game of racquetball. This introductory course will allow students the opportunity for skills acquisition to incorporate the game of racquetball as a lifetime activity. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 131 Introduction to Golf

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts, rules, etiquette, and skills involved in the sport of golf. This introductory course will allow students the opportunity for skills acquisition to incorporate golf as a lifetime activity. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 135 Introduction to Volleyball

This course is designed to allow students to develop basic skills, learn the rules of the game, and utilize basic offensive and defensive systems of the game of volleyball. Credits: 1 (1,0,2)

PED 203 Introduction to First Aid, AED and CPR Training

This course is designed to help students understand the principles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effectiveness of the trained first responder. Students will become proficient in performing CPR on adults, children and infants. Students will also learn to perform various methods of Airway and Pulmonary Resuscitation and AED. The American Red Cross or the American Heart Association certification will be awarded upon the completion of the course. The course will also involve first aid when caring for accidents or sudden illness. Students will learn how to administer first aid and conduct immediate rescue and care of an emergency victim. All students will receive a Standard First Aid Card. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PED 270 Theory and Techniques of Coaching

Topics will include a history of interscholastic athletics in NYS, as well as the objectives, rules, regulations, and policies of athletics. Performance skills, technical information and organization, and management practices will also be among the topics covered. The special training and conditioning of the athletes in specific sports, the filling of equipment needs, specific safety precautions, and officiating methods will also be examined. The student may spend time with a certified coach that would encompass practical experience in the specific sport and/or may spend time observing other approved, certified coaches. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PED 275 Principles, Philosophy and Organization of Athletics in Education

This course covers basic philosophy and principles as integral parts of physical and general education. The student will learn about the state, local, and national regulations related to athletics. In addition, legal considerations and the function and organization of leagues and athletic associations in NYS will be addressed. Personal standards for the responsibilities of the coach as an educational leader, as well as his or her role in public relations and general safety procedures will be covered. The student will also understand the general principles of school budgets, records that must be kept, the purchasing function, and the use of facilities. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PED 280 Health Sciences Applied to Coaching

This course is a series of interactive exercises designed to study Health Sciences as they apply to coaching sports. Through these activities, exercises and health application to coaching topics, participants will gain information, organize it for professional and personal use, and apply it to their particular programs. This course will also help define selected principles of biology, anatomy, physiology and kinesiology related to coaching, risk minimization, mixed competition, NYSED selection and classification of athletes, and age and maturity of athletes. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PED 285 Rules of the Game and NCAA Compliance

This course will prepare students for involvement in the areas of recreation, interscholastic and collegiate sports as well as NCAA compliance. A review of the rules of non-major sports will be emphasized, as there is an increase in participation in those sports by scholastic and college athletes. This course will also help students develop careers in the interscholastic sport administration. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PED NC1 NCAA Physical Education Credit

The Sports Management and Physical Education Departments offer one credit if Physical Education given to any student that participates, in accordance with department guidelines on an NCAA approved athletic team offered at Farmingdale State College. There will be a maximum of two credits issued per student athlete during their stay at FSC. Credits: 1 (0,0,3)

PED NC2 NCAA Physical Education Credit

The Sports Management and Physical Education Departments offer one credit of Physical Education given to any student that participates, in accordance with department guidelines, on an NCAA approved athletic team offered at Farmingdale State College. There will be a maximum of two credits issued per student athlete during their stay at FSC. Credits: 1 (0,0,3)

PHILOSOPHY

PHI 103 Philosophy, Law and the Modern Citizen

An introduction to concepts in philosophy, law, and citizenship and their interrelationship. Ancient and modern thinkers in each field are discussed. Emphasis is on the application of theory to everyday life through citizen apprenticeship. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 105 Philosophy: Classical and Medieval

An examination of philosophical issues based on the writings of classical and medieval authors. Major topics include theory of knowledge, logic, and religion. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 106 Philosophy: Modern and Contemporary

An examination of philosophical issues based on the writings of modern and contemporary authors. Major topics include metaphysics, ethics, and politics. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 205 Ethics

An examination of ethical theories including relativism, determinism, and the concept of duty, and the application of these theories to contemporary problems. The place of ethics in relation to other branches of philosophy and the role of religion in shaping ethical theory are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 207 Business Ethics

An examination of ethical issues that arise in business and how these issues can be resolved. Various principles of ethical theory are analyzed and applied to particular business situations. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 211 Logic

Logic is an introductory course in reasoning offered by the English/Humanities Department. Topics to be considered include: logic and its essential role in the expression of ideas; the definition of logic: kinds of logic, e.g., informal, formal, symbolic; the role of logic in relation to the other fields of philosophy, and to the fields of the social and natural sciences. Other topics: valid categorical syllogisms, syntactic and semantic concepts of proof, reasoning with classes, Venn diagrams, reasoning with propositions, propositional logic, paradox analysis and heuristics- how to think of new ideas and how to solve problems. Prerequisite(s): EGL 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 220 Special Topics in Philosophy

This course allows students to explore intensively a major philosophical period, author or theme. The subject for each semester will be determined prior to registration. Possible topics include: Bioethics, Philosophy of Religion; Philosophy of Africa. Short papers involving secondary research will be required. Prerequisite(s): EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHI 307 Philosophy of Science and Technology

A philosophical overview of developments in science and technology, showing their impact on general culture. Some highlights include the early separation of religion and philosophy, the role of mathematics in culture, the beginnings of modern science in the works of Galileo, Descartes, Leibniz and Newton, and contemporary revolutions in science and technology. Prerequisite(s): One semester of science and EGL 102 with a grade of C or higher Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE

The Physics Department at Farmingdale State College provides its students with an understanding of the interactions among all forms of matter, energy, and space. Toward this end, the Department offers each student a physics education carefully tailored to suit his/her needs at all levels of baccalaureate education. Students pursuing science-related or technically-oriented degrees take either the algebra-based College Physics sequence (PHY 135 and PHY 136) or the calculus-based Physics sequence (PHY 143 and PHY 144). Students who complete these sequences may also choose from a number of electives covering such fields as electromagnetic theory and modern physics. Students not pursuing a science-related field of study may choose from among a diverse assortment of physical science courses, including astronomy, meteorology, geology, and the environment. These specialized courses for non-science students are taught by faculty with strong interest and expertise in the respective sub-disciplines. Students have the opportunity to taste the flavor of science and to appreciate its value to humanity in a technical society.

PHY 110 Physical Science: Physical Geology

A survey course in physical geology, examining the various minerals and rock types and the physical processes occurring on and below the surface of the earth. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 111 Physical Science: Historical Geology

A study in the origin and evolution of the earth through geological time and the methods used by geologist in determining the geological history of the earth. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 112 Physical Science Survey

A broad descriptive course in Physical Science. Topics to be covered will be from the areas of Philosophy of Science, Astronomy, Physics, Meteorology, Chemistry, Technology, and the Environment. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 113 Physical Science: Physics

A descriptive course that presents the ideas of Classical and Modern Physics qualitatively and conceptually. The emphasis will be on the relevance of Physics to the students' own experience. Topics covered will be Mechanics, Properties of Matter, Heat, Sound, Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Quantum Theory and Nuclear Physics. This course requires some knowledge of high school level mathematics. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 114 Physical Science: Environment

A descriptive course dealing with environmental problems caused by population, pollution, transportation, energy requirements, radioactivity, radioactive wastes, thermal emission, noise and heat. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 115 Physical Science: Energy

An introductory course in the scientific, technological and social aspects of Energy. The course is intended to develop an understanding of the physical basis of Energy and an appreciation of the role of Energy in the contemporary world. Basic concepts and principles are studied. Conservation Laws, Fuels, and Energy Conversion Systems are discussed. Resources, Consumption Patterns, and Alternative Economics are analyzed. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 116 Physical Science: Meteorology

A descriptive course in elementary meteorology that will introduce the student to weather analysis and forecasting. Topics covered will be Temperature, Pressure, Wind Radiation, Clouds, Precipitation, Synoptic weather charts, Air Masses, Low and High Pressure Areas, Frontal Systems, Thunderstorms, Weather Forecasting, and Local Weather. Weather charts will be analyzed and students will make their own weather forecasts. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 117 Physical Science: Solar Astronomy

An elementary astronomy course in which the student is introduced to the historical development of astronomy, and to our present view of the solar system and its origins. Recent NASA missions to the planets are discussed, and periodic observations of the skies may be conducted. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 118 Physical Science: Stellar Astronomy

An elementary astronomy course in which the stars and galaxies are treated in detail. Recently discovered phenomena, such as pulsars, quasars, and black holes will be studied. Discussion will also center on cosmology, the NASA missions, colonization of space, and other topical subjects in astronomy. Periodic evening observations of the skies may be conducted. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 119 Physical Science: Technology

A descriptive course emphasizing the major events in Technological History, the Rise of Scientific Technology, Delivery Systems, Systems Science, and the impact of Technology of Man and Society. The course is intended to assist the student in the formulation of a personal set of criteria in order to understand and respond to technological changes in modern society. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 120 Physical Science: Extraterrestrial Phenomena

The possible existence of extraterrestrial life is examined by investigating those areas of the physical sciences and related disciplines which may shed more light on this elusive problem. Arguments are drawn from astronomy, astrophysics, electromagnetic theory, probability theory, relativity, atomic physics, nuclear physics and particle physics. Historical and archaeological views are also discussed. The discussion of extraterrestrial life is utilized as a framework from which many mysteries of the universe are unraveled for the student. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 121 Descriptive Classical Physics

A course covering the fundamental concepts of Classical Physics. Primarily intended for students in the Arts option of the Liberal Arts and Sciences program. Topics will include mechanics, heat, electricity, and magnetism. A knowledge of elementary algebra is required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 122 Descriptive Modern Physics

This is a course covering the fundamental concepts of modern physics. This course is intended for non-science students, including students in the Arts Option of the Liberal Arts and Sciences programs, as well as students in the School of Business. Topics will include waves, light, relativity, quantum physics, the nucleus and elementary particles. Knowledge of elementary algebra is required. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 123 The Theory of Everything-The Unification of Physical Law

The four fundamental forces in nature, gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces, appear to be very distinct phenomena. Early attempts to unify them into a single theory of the universe were met with failure and even such great physicists as Albert Einstein were often derided for such futile efforts. With the advent of recent strides in string theory, super symmetry, M-Theory and hyperspace, most physicists believe that man is within reach of such fundamental knowledge. It is the purpose of this course to place this same understanding of unification within the student's grasp. Without resorting to any complex calculations, the course will survey Newton's classical mechanics, Maxwell's theory of electricity and magnetism, Einstein's relativity theories, quantum mechanics, particle physics, and the new particle physics strings. The student will contemplate the possibility of a universe which may be fully explained by a single physical theory. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 125L Physical Science Laboratory I

A Physical Science Laboratory to accompany any of the Physical Science Theory courses listed above. Experiments will be in the area of Physics, Astronomy, Meteorology, the Environment and Technology. Credits: 1 (0,2)

PHY 126L Physical Science Laboratory II

A continuation of PHY 125L. Prerequisite(s): PHY 125L Credits: 1 (0,2)

PHY 128 Physics: Computers/ Computation

The physical principles which govern the design and use of computing equipment are discussed. Discussion will include the historical development of computation equipment from the Babbage calculator through integrated semiconductor logic and laser-optical memories. Other topics will demonstrate the use of computation in scientific applications and will include Boolean logic, binary arithmetic, programming languages and an introduction to programming. Prerequisite(s): PHY 113 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 129 Computers in Physical Sciences

A course designed to familiarize the student with computer operation in the physical science laboratory. Credits: 1 (0,2)

PHY 135 College Physics I

An integrated theory/laboratory general college physics course without calculus. Topics will include fundamental concepts of units, vectors, equilibrium, velocity and acceleration in linear and rotational motion, force, energy, momentum, fluids at rest and in motion, and oscillatory motion. Laboratory problems, experiments and report writing associated with the topics studied in the theory are performed. Prerequisite(s): MTH 129 Corequisite(s): PHY 135L Credits: 4 (4,2)

PHY 136 College Physics II

A continuation of PHY 135. Topics will include heat, electricity, magnetism, light and optics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 135 Corequisite(s): PHY 136L Credits: 4 (4,2)

PHY 143 General Physics I (Calculus)

A fundamental, calculus based, physics course with laboratory offered primarily for students in Science curricula. Topics discussed include Mechanics, Wave Motion, Kinetic Theory, and Thermodynamics. One of MTH 130 or MTH 150 must be taken either as a prerequisite or corequisite. Credits: 4 (4,2)

PHY 144 General Physics II (Calculus)

A continuation of PHY 143. Topics discussed include Electricity, Magnetism and Optics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 143 Corequisite(s): PHY 144L Credits: 4 (4,2)

PHY 151 University Physics I

A fundamental, calculus based, physics course in three semesters offered primarily for students in the Engineering Science curriculum. Topics discussed in the first semester include mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, work energy momentum, conservation laws, and fluids. Prerequisite(s): MTH 150 Credits: 4 (3,0,2)

PHY 152 University Physics II

A continuation of PHY 151. Topics will include Coulomb's Law, the electric field, potential, capacitance and properties of dielectrics, current, resistance and electromotive force. D-C circuits and instruments. The magnetic field and forces, induced EMF, alternating currents and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisite(s): PHY 151 Corequisite(s): MTH 151 Credits: 3 (2,0,2)

PHY 161 University Physics Laboratory

Laboratory experiments associated with PHY 151 and part of PHY 152. Prerequisite(s): PHY 151 Corequisite(s): PHY 152 Credits: 1 (0,3)

PHY 220 Of the Cosmos: Humans in the Universe

Of the Cosmos - Humans in the Universe explores the context of our existence in terms of cosmic, biological, and societal evolution. Within this interdisciplinary course we will examine how the underlying physical laws of our Universe, acting across systems of varied complexity, have led to the current state of our civilization. Starting with the Big Bang, we will follow the evolution of matter from primordial nucleosynthesis to the formation of the Earth in the solar nebula. We will examine the evolution of life on Earth, the ascent of Humankind, the emergence of civilization, invention of technology, and the long-term prospects for the species. Current problems facing our civilization (e.g. climate change, resource scarcity, antibiotic resistance) will be examined within this context. Prerequisite(s): General Education Lab Science Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 228 Introduction to Computational Physics

An introduction to computational physics in which students will apply the mathematical techniques of root finding, numerical integration, interpolation, Fourier analysis, and the solution of ordinary differential equations to physical problems including chaotic dynamics, circuit response, electrostatics, data modeling and prediction, and biophysics. No previous programming experience is expected though basic computer skills will be helpful. Prerequisite(s): (PHY 135 or PHY 143) and (MTH 130 or MTH 150) Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 242 The Science of Science Fiction

This course surveys the science within science fiction in multiple genres of media (e.g. print, television, and movies). It explores the uses and abuses of the hard sciences in service to storytelling. It identifies the importance of real scientific ideas in understanding the limits and boundaries of science fiction’s commentary on society. Prerequisite(s): PHY 135 or PHY 143 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 253 University Physics III

A continuation of PHY 152. Topics will include temperature and expansion, heat and heat measurements, transfer of heat, thermal properties of matter thermodynamics, molecular properties of matter, wave motion, vibration bodies, acoustical phenomena, light reflection and refraction, lenses and optical instruments. Interference and diffraction, polarization. Prerequisite(s): PHY 152 Credits: 3 (2,0,2)

PHY 254 Modern Physics

An introduction to the basic ideas of modern physics such as Einstein's theories of relativity, early ideas of atomic structure including the Bohr and Rutherford models, photoelectric effect, de Broglie waves, wave mechanics, Schroedinger's Equation, Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, Hydrogen Atom, electron spin, Pauli's Exclusion Principle, quantum oscillator, classical and quantum statistics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and elementary particles. Prerequisite(s): PHY 144 or PHY 253 Credits: 4 (4,0)

PHY 255 Oscillatory Motion and Waves

An introduction to physical concepts (wave packets, normal modes, interference and diffraction) and mathematical techniques (Fourier series, transforms, complex numbers, eigenvectors), including the wave equation. Prerequisite(s): PHY 136 or PHY 144 and MTH 151 or MTH 236 all with a minimum grade of C or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 262L University Physics II Lab

Laboratory experiments associated with PHY 152 and PHY 253. Prerequisite(s): PHY 161 Corequisite(s): PHY 253 Credits: 1 (0,3)

PHY 304 Big Data and Society

This course will survey the current methods employed to measure, shape, and predict large scale patterns, problems, and solutions in our society. It focuses on how creating, understanding, and manipulating large data sets affects society. Students will learn firsthand to work with large data sets and make novel predictions using computational techniques. Prerequisite(s): PHY 135 or PHY 143, and Junior status Corequisite(s): PHY 304L Credits: 4 (3,2)

PHY 310 Analytical Mechanics

A course in Analytical Mechanics covering Vectors, Newtonian Mechanics – Rectilinear Motion of a Particle, Oscillations, The General Motion of a Particle in Three Dimensions, Non-inertial Reference Systems, Gravitation and Central Forces, Dynamics of Systems of Particles, Mechanics of Rigid Bodies – Planar Motion, Lagrangian Mechanics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 144 and MTH 253 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 323 Electromagnetic Theory

This course is an introduction to electromagnetic theory. Topics covered are Vector Analysis; Coulomb's Law; Gauss's Law; the Del Operator; the Divergence and Gradient; the Potential; Potential Gradient; Conductors, Dielectrics and Capacitors; the Magnetic Field; the Biot-Savart Law; Ampere's Law; the Curl of E and H; Faraday's Law; Maxwell's Equations. Prerequisite(s): PHY 136 and MTH 236 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 333 Modern Physics

An introduction to topics in modern physics for upper-division students. Topics included are Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, Atomic Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics, and Solid State Physics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 136 or 144 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 334L Modern Physics Laboratory

An introduction to topics in modern physics for upper-division students. Topics included are Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, Atomic Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics, and Solid State Physics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 136 or 144 Corequisite(s): PHY 333T Credits: 1 (0,3)

PHY 356 Integrated Topics in Math and Physics

This is a new integrated math-physics course with applications to topics in physics and the engineering technologies. It is meant to be interdisciplinary in nature and directed toward students in the Bachelor of Technology and Applied Math Programs. Topics to be covered include: Vector Algebra, Vector Calculus, Scalar and Vector Field Theory, Fourier Series, Fourier Integral, Fourier Transforms and Laplace Transforms. The focus will be on application and integration of math methods to physics and engineering technologies. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for MTH 356. Prerequisite(s): MTH 236 or 252 and PHY 136 or 144 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 420 Optics

This course is an introduction to the study of light on the intermediate level. It is an elective course for students in their fourth year of the Electrical Technology program. It begins with a review of the mathematics of wave motion. Starting from Maxwell's equations, the electromagnetic theory of light is discussed. Topics covered will be the propagation of light, the laws of reflection and refraction, the superposition of waves, interference and diffraction of light, the quantum nature of light, and the concept of the laser. Prerequisite(s): PHY 323 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PHY 480 Physics Research I

Physics Research I represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Students will work alongside physics faculty in their professional research. Registration requires submission of resume three months in advance, physics faculty invitation or recommendation, and department Chair approval. Prerequisite(s): PHY 135 or PHY 143 with a minimum grade of C or higher; and permission of department chair Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

PHY 481 Physics Research II

Physics Research II represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Students will work alongside physics faculty in their professional research. Registration requires submission of resume three months in advance, physics faculty invitation or recommendation, and department Chair approval. Prerequisite(s): PHY 480 Physics Research I with a minimum grade of B or better; and permission of department chair Credits: 3 (0,0,9)

POLITICS

POL 105 Introduction to Politics

This course will introduce students to the study of politics and to the discipline known as Political Science. Focusing on fundamental concepts of power and authority, the course will examine topics central to each of the main subfields of Political Science: American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Political Philosophy. It will also explore some contemporary issues and debates that captivate US politics. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 110 Introduction to Legal Studies

This is a survey course designed to give the student a basic introduction to law beginning with the various schools of legal philosophical thought, criminal and civil law and procedure, and basic contract law. The course provides the student with an understanding and overview of how the American legal system functions including introducing students to the principles of law, the administration of the legal system, legal terminology, and the inter- relationship between politics, governmental structures, legal professionals and the functioning of the legal system. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 115 Introduction to Public Policy

This course is a survey of contemporary issues in American public policy such as education, health care, welfare programs, crime, environmental issues, and the economy. The course will promote familiarity with major policy issues being discussed and debated in government today, as well as develop students problem-solving abilities, analytical techniques, critical thinking, and communication skills. A variety of social science fields and concepts, including political economy, program evaluation, policy analysis, and public management, will be assessed and applied to problems of governmental administration, management, and operations. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 250 American Politics

This course introduces students to American Politics by focusing on national politics. In addition to examining the structure of U.S. government at the federal level, this course will also investigate American political behavior (especially political parties, elections, voting) and selected policy debates the animate contemporary political discussion. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 251 State and Local Government

An examination of the structures and purposes of state, county, and municipal political institutions, emphasizing the importance of citizen participation in community affairs and the election process, in enhancing the effectiveness of state legislatures and judicial systems, county and municipal government, and the protection of civil rights through law enforcement. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 262 Global Politics

An introduction to global politics which explores regional issues in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, the America etc., as well as genuinely transnational concerns such as pandemics, international terrorism, environmental degradation, etc. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 263 American Foreign Relations

A focus on American foreign relations in the post-World War II era, describing the transition from isolationism to the adoption of mutual security agreements, and political and constitutional sanctions which sustain the nation's overseas commitments. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 265 Comparative Politics

This course examines a broad range of governmental systems utilizing the comparative methods of analysis. In addition to analysis of selected political systems in the developed world (e.g., Great Britain, the United States, and the Russian Federation), students will also explore the governmental structures of at least one country in the developing world (India, Brazil, the People's Republic of China, etc.). Students will also compare plural democracies, monarchies, dictatorships, and neo-authoritarian forms of government, emphasizing policy-making and contemporary problems facing the state in era of globalization, such as the purported victory of neo-liberalism, the threat of terrorism, and the importance of satellite television and the Internet in shaping politics. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 267 Politics of the Muslim World

This course provides an introduction to the global politics Islam, including regional issues in the Arab world, Central Asia, and South Asia, as well as the impact of Islamic politics on parts of the globe where Muslims represent a significant minority (Europe, Russia, China, and sub-Saharan Africa). Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 273 Italian Politics and Society

This survey course is designed for students who have a lively curiosity about Italy. Employing a historical perspective, students will examine Italy's efforts at "nation-building" from Machiavelli to the present. Students will learn about Italy's unique and extensive contributions to Western Civilization (politics, economics, science, art, culture, societal organization). They will also be introduced to definitions, concepts, distinctions, and theories that are fundamental to the study of political science and, in particular, the subfields of comparative politics and political philosophy. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 310 Introduction to Political Theory

This course will introduce students to some of the major themes and classic works of Western political philosophy. Focusing on a central theme (e.g. political obligation, human rights, equality), students will examine how that issue is addressed by some classic political philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx. They will also assess and debate contemporary US theory and practice with regard to the issue at hand. Prerequisite: Any 100 level or higher social science (ANT, ECO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC). Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 320 Internet Politics

In the developed world, the issue is not whether the Internet affects politics, society, culture and commerce, but rather how and why it does and to what consequences. How do we comprehend the tensions, contradictions, conflicts, paradoxes created by the rapid spreading of the Internet? This course examines the impact of recent communication technologies on the social system, democracy and government, social movements and interactions, markets and commerce, globalization and governance, and the relations between culture and the state. This course focuses on the intersections among politics, society and commerce through a comparative perspective and asks students to evaluate the central controversial policy dilemmas and problems that have emerged and persisted over the Internet. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 360 Women in Comparative Development

This course examines the relationship between women and development, including controversies surrounding the gendered impact of development strategies. It explores issues such as women’s health, education, employment, and population planning in in the developing world. The course will analyze how women’s rights, leadership, and political participation are restricted or hindered by various societal and governmental structures. The course will consider a wide range of issues and human rights violations against women and examine how such inequalities affect the political and developmental progress of a country. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 370 International Relations

This course examines how the international political system was established and how it has changed since the Peace of Westphalia. Focusing on the role of states, complemented by a thorough analysis of non-state actors, students will investigate how the global system works and how the process of globalization is remaking the political and economic world. The art and purpose of diplomacy will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 371 Geopolitics

This course examines the strategic, political, and cultural developments and concepts associated with geopolitical from late 19th century through the current era. Combining knowledge of international relations and world geography, students will examine how states and nations interact in an increasingly globalized world. Special topics will include the geopolitics of space, energy, religion, and the environment. Popular media's impact on geopolitics understanding will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 372 Politics of Europe

This course is a comparative evaluation of European governments and politics, paying particular attention to challenges facing the Continent such as ethno-nationalism, immigration, and terrorism. Integration of the former Eastern Bloc into Europe since 1989 will figure prominently in the course. Transnational cooperation and integration through organizations such as NATO and the European Union will be considered. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 373 Politics in Asia and the Pacific Rim

This course is a comparative evaluation of governments and international politics in the Asia-Pacific region, paying particular attention to the rise of China and the new geopolitics of the Pacific Rim. Regional rivalries, economic reform, and foreign policy will figure prominently in the course. Transnational cooperation and integration through organizations such as APEC, ASEAN, and ANZUS will be considered. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 374 Politics in Africa

This course addresses modern African politics, including, but not limited to the colonial background and its consequences, ethnicity, the military, ideology, dependency, democracy and political stability. While a thematic approach to African politics is stressed in the course, an underlying current in the course will be the tensions that exist between opposing forces in African politics. Some of these influences include foreign and indigenous influences, anarchy and order, democracy and authoritarianism, socialism and capitalism, political decay, and development. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level course in Social Science Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 390 Environmental Politics

This course examines the evolution of the environmental movement in the U.S. and worldwide, focusing on the debate over environmental protection, policy-making, and the political ramifications for the national governments. Biodiversity, climate change, population issues, water pollution, regulation of emissions, land preservation, energy policy, transnational cooperation, eco-terrorism, and theories of the global commons will all be explored from a domestic and global perspective. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 391 Mass Media and Politics

This course provides a comprehensive survey of mass media's role in politics and the impact of the political environment on the press. It investigates the major media platforms (print, radio, television and the Internet) and how each shapes political culture. While the scope of the course is global, much attention is paid to the American media landscape. Other regions to be covered include the former Soviet Union, the Arab World, East Asia, and Europe. Special topics to be explored include: news management, transnational media empires, the CNN effect, infotainment, "fake news," the mass mediation of terrorism, and the connection between media and democracy. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 or higher level HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 392 Religion and Politics

This course examines the complicated and often fractious relationship between religion and politics. Following a brief introduction to the world's major religions, we will explore how politics and faith interact around the globe. Following a geographic approach, we will focus first on the United States before investigating the politics of religion in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, Latin America, and the Asia-Pacific region. The themes of theocracy, sectarian conflict, fundamentalism, Islamism, secularism, and so-called "religious terrorism" will be investigated. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher POL or HIS course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 393 Politics and Popular Culture

This course examines the influence of popular culture on political identity within the United States and across the globe. The relationship between the U.S. entertainment industry and the political system will be explored, while the second half of the course will focus on the impact of global popular culture on international relations. Various forms of pop culture will be addressed, including but not limited to: film, television, music, video games, novels, comics, political cartoons, jokes, blogging, fads, and fashion. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 395 Special Topics in Politics

This course offers instruction in special content areas not included in other Politic courses. All courses will include component focusing on the interplay between technology, globalization, and politics, either in U.S. or at the international level. This course will require extensive reading and research, focused on the selected topic. Students should consult the department before registering for any Special Topic course. Prerequisite(s): Any 100 level or higher HIS or POL course. Credits: 3 (3,0)

POL 398 Washington DC Internship

This option is available to students admitted to the Washington Internship Institute (WII) program that is affiliated with Farmingdale State College. A wide variety of internships are available in government offices, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit companies. Recent Farmingdale students have been placed at the IRS, the non-profit “No Labels,” The Center for American Democracy, CNN, the Iraqi Embassy, and Capitol Hill offices. The four-day per week internship is supplemented by two courses: an internship seminar and an extra course selected by the student. Prerequisite(s): Approval by Study Abroad Office and Student's Department Chair Corequisite(s): Sophomore, Junior, or Senior status Credits: 3-12 (1,0,6 to 33)

POL 399 NYS Legislative Internship

For students participating in the full-time New York State Assembly and Senate Legislator Session Internship programs. Students work as staff members in their assigned State Legislator/Senator's office a minimum of 30 hours a week, conducting. During the internship, students participate in seminars, mock legislative sessions, and weekly research and written assignments. A written report on the internship experience is required of the student at the conclusion of the internship. Internships are open only to qualified junior and seniors with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher through a competitive selection process. Spring semester only. Note: Students must consult with the Campus Liaison Office to determine credit value to be assigned. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Department Chair and Junior/Senior Level class standing and admission to NYS Assembly/Senate Internship Program. Credits: 3 to 15 (1,0,6 to 42)

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

This course is designed to present basic psychological concepts and to introduce students to the scientific study of behavior. Core topics include methods of psychological research, the biological bases of behavior, principles of learning, memory and cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Other selected topics to be covered would include the following: motivation and emotion, life-span development, social psychology, health psychology, sensation and perception, intelligence, human sexuality, statistics, and altered states of consciousness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 230 Gender Psychology

This course will examine sex role stereotypes and their effects, research on psychological sex differences, theories of male and female development, sex roles and social institutions - how perceptions of males and females are influenced by schools, religion, and the media; and male and female approaches to sexuality, marriage, and parenthood. Readings and class discussions will be used to help students achieve a greater understanding of the female and the male experience. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 231 Group Dynamics

This course blends theory and application of the principles of group interaction and development. This is not a lecture course. Through actively participating in class exercises, students will have an opportunity to develop their sense of self in relation to others and to develop skill in effective group functioning. The general content of the course involves group formation, communication, leadership, decision-making, problem solving, goal setting, power and influence, conflict and conflict resolution, cohesion norms, and stages of group development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 232 Child Development

In this course the student will explore human development from preconception through the end of childhood. Course material will include historical and modern concepts of attitudes towards children, theories and models of child development, research methods in the study of children, genetics, prenatal development and influence, pregnancy, and birth. Within each age range the emphasis will be on factors influencing the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child. Developmental disorders, both physical and psychological, will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 233 Adolescent Development

This course focuses on adolescent behavior. The emphasis is on growth and change-physiological, psychological/interpersonal and socio-cultural. Issues of particular concern to adolescents will be presented and discussed. Some selected topics are: peer pressure, the sexual issue, the availability of drugs, establishing a separate identity, dating and relationships and finally the transition to adulthood. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 234 Social Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of how people influence each other. Topics to be covered include: liking and loving, aggression and violence, obedience and compliance, helping in emergencies, attitudes, prejudice and sexism. In addition, social perception and group behavior will be examined. Prerequisite(s):PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 237 Theories of Personality

The course will examine the concept of personality from four theoretical perspectives: psychodynamic, trait, learning, and humanistic. Representative theories of each perspective are discussed in terms of basic conceptualizations, methods of assessment, development, research and clinical applications. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 238 Psychology of Human Sexuality

This course presents a scientific foundation for the understanding of the psychological, physiological, social, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality. In addition to studying historical changes in sexual practices and attitudes, the course will review and evaluate current research, issues and concerns about sexuality, in order to provide contemporary and relevant curriculum material. Topics include psychosexual development, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual anatomy, alternate methods of reproduction, pregnancy/birth, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sex education, sexism, love and attraction, sexual abuse, sexual dysfunctions, sex therapy, paraphilias, and sexuality through the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 240 Health Psychology

Health Psychology is the study of psychological factors that affect health and illness. This course will apply a scientific and research perspective to the study of health promoting and health damaging behaviors. Using a biopsychosocial approach, behavioral patterns that result in cardiovascular disease, cancer, alcoholism, sexually transmitted diseases and other conditions will be explored. Course content will focus on stress and the immune system, stress management techniques, the health care system, risk taking, culture-bound syndromes, diversity issues, social support, and the role of the patient. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 242 Educational Psychology

This course will present current scientific theory and research related to formal learning environments. Individual differences in cognitive, social, and emotional development, and the implications for the teaching/learning process will be explored. These general areas will be addressed through more specific topics including growth and development, learning theories, moral development, motivation, and classroom management. In addition, issues related to teaching in a diverse society will be addressed. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 242 and 242W; PSY 242W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 248 Statistics for Psychology

This course will introduce students to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics used in the behavioral and social sciences. Topics will include the organization of data, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, hypothesis testing, and various parametric and nonparametric tests of significance including t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square analysis. Students will learn the interconnections between theory, research methods, and statistical techniques in order to use statistics to analyze experimental data and reach objective conclusions regarding research questions in the social sciences. The course will also provide an introduction to using statistical software for data summarization, presentation and analysis. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and MTH 110. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 251 Developmental Disabilities: History and Service Provision

In this course, students will learn about the needs and challenges faced by people with developmental disabilities. The course will cover developmental disorders including, but not limited to, cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, and intellectual disabilities. Students will explore the social, cognitive and behavioral limitations associated with each disorder. This course will focus on understanding the complex needs of people with developmental disorders and the value of providing them with functional, supportive, and individualized services. The course will also explore the history of service provision to people with developmental disorders, the changes that have occurred in those services over the last four decades, and current standards of care. The course will outline the ethical and legal issues involved in service provision. Heavy emphasis will be placed on viewing developmental disabilities through functional and behavioral perspectives. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 252 Adult Development

This course will deal primarily with the psychological correlates of development and transitions during adulthood. Specifically, the course will focus on such topics as what it means to be an adult, the meaning of marriage, the meaning of work, being a parent, divorce, the empty nest syndrome, mid-life crisis, retirement, and facing death. Biological and social factors will be taken into consideration, as will psychological theories and individual responses to stages and passages throughout adulthood. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 253 Life Span Development

This course provides a comprehensive overview of normal human development throughout the life span. It will apply a scientific and research perspective to understanding both age-related change and consistency. The course will examine physical, cognitive, social and emotional development at every stage of life, with an emphasis on continuity and discontinuity of development as we progress from one stage of life to the next. Additionally, students will learn about those theories and research methods which are most pertinent to the study of lifespan development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 255 Topics in Psychology

This course will enable students to explore a specific subfield or topic of interest in Psychology, in a challenging atmosphere, with emphasis on student participation and written assignments. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Possible topics include but are not limited to: Consumer Behavior, Health Psychology, Psychology and the Law, Sport Psychology, and Parapsychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 257 Teaching of Psychology

This course is designed to expose students to current thinking about teaching and learning and the underlying content in the field of psychology. In addition, it aims to promote understanding of psychology as a profession as it relates to a career in academia. This is accomplished by offering students a unique opportunity to attend a professional conference on the Teaching of Psychology. During the conference students will have the unique opportunity to listen to, and participate in presentations on some of the newest ideas in the teaching of Psychology. In many cases the presentations they hear will be the first time the ideas have been presented in public. Students will be able to observe and interact on both a formal and informal level with a group of professional Psychologists. This course is designed especially for students who have expressed an interest in continuing in the field of Psychology and/or teaching. However, it can be a valuable experience for virtually all students, regardless of their career plans. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 257 and 257W; PSY 257W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 260 Research Methods

This course will present the scientific method within the context of applied psychology. Research techniques and methods will be examined for the formulation of hypotheses, development of testable objectives, experimental design, subject selection, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and report preparation. This course will focus on laboratory based methods and simple statistical procedures for the analysis of data. Students will apply the concepts and methods in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s): PSY 248. Credits: 4 (4,0)

PSY 264 Introduction to Biopsychology

This course is designed to introduce students to the biological underpinnings of behavior. The first part of the course will focus on building a foundation in neuroscience and will cover chapters on neuroanatomy (organization of the nervous system, major brain structures and their functions), neural signal transmission (how neurons communicate with each other) and sensory and motor systems (how the nervous system processes information and interacts with the environment). The second half of the course will be dedicated to understanding the relationship between complex human behaviors and brain functions, and will cover topics such as learning and memory, aging, hormones and sex, emotion, stress, health and drug addiction in the brain. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 265 Culture and Cognition

This course explores the methods, research, and theory in the field of culture, cognitions, and psychology in general. The main aim of the course is to introduce and familiarize students with the role of culture across a variety of psychological areas including perception, cognition, emotion, developmental processes, as well as social and abnormal behavior. The course is organized into three, inter-dependent modules. The first module concerns the exploration of culture as a determinant of one’s socialization and development of personality. The second module provides an excursion into the role of culture in cognition; the way we think, perceive and organize our knowledge. The third module explores anthropological works on morality, religion, ritual, and emotion. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 272 Cognitive Psychology

This course covers the psychological study of human information processing in terms of structure, process, and application. The representation of knowledge in memory is addressed as is the cognitive processes used for information acquisition, information retrieval, and forgetting. The cognitive processes of attention, pattern recognition, language, comprehension, and thinking will be reviewed in terms of their application to cognitive activities such as decision-making, reasoning, problem solving, and creativity. The application of cognitive theory to artificial intelligence is also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 280 Preparation for Graduate Training in Psychology

This course will provide those Applied Psychology majors who are considering graduate training in psychology with the opportunity to explore the various specialties in psychology (and related fields) as well as the graduate training required by each subfield. Students will explore their own interests while simultaneously researching and being provided with information regarding the many types of graduate training available. Self-assessment regarding standardized entrance examinations such as the GRE will be provided. Developmental plans will be generated based on self-assessment results. Applied Psychology majors who are considering graduate training are encouraged to take this one credit elective course during their sophomore year of the program. Course grading is Pass/Repeat. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101, Applied Psychology major Credits: 1 (1,0)

PSY 300 Forensic Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of forensic psychology, a discipline that applies psychology to the law and the criminal justice system. Topics to be covered include: the psychologist's role in the criminal courts, ethical dilemmas of psychologists working in the criminal justice system, psychological perspective on the nature of criminality and the investigation of crime, criminal profiling, the effects of psychological empirical research on the outcome of criminal trials, and the psychology of the police, witnesses, offenders, and victims. Other new research topics in the field, such as the use of brain fingerprinting technology to determine criminal culpability will also be explored. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJ 300 and PSY 300. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or CRJ 100 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 301 Learning

This course examines the principles and theories of learning including the methodology and evaluation of research pertaining to learning processes. Topics will include a broad range of learning paradigms, from relatively simple processes such as classical conditioning and operant conditioning, to more cognitively complex processes such as concept formation and schema development. The research describing information acquisition, transfer, and forgetting will be reviewed. In addition, the influence of conditions such as motivational factors, will be examined. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 304 Multicultural Psychology

Reflecting the 21st century global theme of acculturation, PSY 304 will focus on the ways in which the study and practice of psychology intersect with race, culture, and diversity. Topics include racial/ethnic/religious group differences, cultural norms, gender and sexual orientation issues, family, structure, and identity development. Primary focus will be given to the ways that race and culture contribute to disparities in access to mental health treatment as well as differences in beliefs about mental illness and its treatment. Consistent with an applied psychology approach, the student will develop an understanding of how diversity issues affect the workplace, i.e., discrimination in hiring/firing practices, affirmative action laws, multicultural competence, and sensitivity training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 307 Psychology of Women

This course is about being female in American culture. The purpose of the course is to examine the lives of girls and women from a feminist psychological perspective. It addresses the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors influencing women’s behavior, thoughts, and feelings. The course is “woman-affirming” as it will examine and validate women’s experiences and perspectives. The course will highlight how race, class, and sexual orientation intersect with gender to affect women’s lives. Topics will include: behavioral and psychological gender differences and their origins; concepts of femininity and gender stereotypes; pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood; women, achievement and work; violence against women; women and mental health (disparity in diagnosis and treatment); and feminist psychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 311 Organizational Behavior

This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communications and dynamics; decision making; causes and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power and politics in organizations. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 311 and 311W; PSY 311W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Psychology Department. Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 315 Abnormal Psychology

In this course the student will learn about concepts, theories, and issues in psychopathology (the study of mental illness and behavioral disorders). Topics may include historical background, mental health professionals, legal issues, normality/abnormality, etiology/assessment/ diagnosis/therapy, anxiety/stress/depression, personality disorders, sexual deviance, schizophrenia, neurological dysfunction, substance abuse, and psychophysiological disorders. The applications of psychology to personal problem solving will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 316 Atypical Development

In this course students will explore developmental deviations that result in disorders of childhood focusing on neurodevelopmental disorders (intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and specific learning disorder) and psychopathology (anxiety, mood, and conduct disorders). Developmental theories will be utilized to analyze disorders at the genetic, brain, behavioral, and cognitive levels. Emphasis will be placed on examining neurobiological and environmental factors contributing to disorders of childhood. The final portion of the course will focus on how atypical development may contribute to our understanding of typical development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 232 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 317 Organizational Development

This course examines the behavioral science based theories, strategies and interventions that organizations use to execute planned, organization-wide changes to increase organization effectiveness and health. Theoretical models and processes will be reviewed and used to evaluate an organization’s capacity to improve and change. The course is structured to cover the background, process, and content of organizational development. Real–world examples of organizational development will be presented to illustrate current and best practices used by modern organizations. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 320 Sensation and Perception

This course will survey the experimental psychology of sensory and perceptual process and behavior. Theories and processes relating the transformation of physical energies (such as light and sound) to psychological experiences (such as seeing object and hearing noises) will be discussed. While the research examined will primarily focus on the visual and auditory systems, the other sensory systems will be discussed as well. The emphasis will be on the contribution of behavioral science to understanding subjective experience of physical and social phenomena. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 324 Psychological Measurement and Assessment

An analysis of the theory and practice of psychological measurement and assessment including the implications of psychological measurement in society and institutions such as schools, the workplace, clinical populations and other groups with special needs. Topics will include overview and history of the field, foundations of psychological testing and psychometrics, the assessment of ability, the assessment of personality, the assessment of interest and vocational choice, and ethical /social/cultural issues of psychological assessment. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 325 Principles of Survey Research

This course covers the basic principles of survey research related to the design, evaluation, implementation, and analysis of surveys. Students will be introduced to the skills and resources needed to conduct quality survey research. The course is focused on the Tailored Design Method and emphasizes the customization of survey procedures for each survey situation. The course will cover the complete procedure of survey research including an introduction to different types of surveys, the development of survey instruments, an evaluation of reliability and validity, guidelines for implementation, sampling procedures, methods to increase response rate and reduce errors, and data entry, analysis, and reporting. Prerequisite(s): PSY 248 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 326 Introduction to Behavioral Health Science

Behavioral Health Science is the scientific study of the ways that human behavior can affect health/mental health status and health/mental health outcomes. Introduction to Behavioral Health Science will explore how human actions, cognitions, relationships, interactions and systems affect health, well-being, and quality of life. This course will examine the integration of mental health care and health care from a historical, practical, and policy perspective. Students completing the course will understand the significance of health care policy changes as they relate to psychology, and the dramatic shift in thinking about how and where health/mental health care can be integrated and administered. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 328 Introduction to Human Factors

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human factors psychology. Human factors psychology is the application of the body of scientific facts about human characteristics to the design, operation and organization of human machine systems. Human-machine systems can range from simple consumer products to complex arrangements of hardware, software and personnel, such as aviation systems. Human factors knowledge, methods and techniques will be surveyed with an emphasis on ensuring that the systems, equipment, personnel tasks and work environment are compatible with the human sensory, perceptual, cognitive and physical attributes of the personnel who function within the human machine system. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 330 Organizational Training and Development

An upper level offering, this course will provide a greater understanding of the theory, research, techniques, and current and future issues in the field of organizational training and development through an experimental learning approach. Topics shall include training systems, needs analysis, organization intervention, program evaluation, adult learning theory, cognitive issues, conditions for learning transfer, instructional techniques and current social and organizational issues in training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 331 Industrial / Organizational Psychology

Students will explore how the science and practice of psychology is applied in the world of work and organizations. Among the topics that will be examined are the history and research methodology of industrial/organizational psychology, job analysis, employee selection, performance evaluation, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, group dynamics, and organizational development. The course will highlight emerging trends in the modern workforce and examine how these changes will impact research and practice in today's organizations. Students will examine the factors influencing cross-cultural diversity and globalization, the theoretical and practical implications of these workforce trends, and how current organizational theories and practices apply to cultures outside of the United States. Implications for the full range of topics discussed in the course will be examined including how cultural diversity and globalization affect employee selection procedures, group dynamics, preferences for leadership, training needs, work motivation, and organizational development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 340 Behavior Analysis Modification

An analysis of the general principles, theories and application of conditioning and learning in humans. The application of the theories of behavioral analysis to human problems will be explored. Behavioral interventions using the principles of classical conditioning, operant conditioning and modeling will be presented. Particular emphasis will be placed on behavioral analysis and intervention in settings such as mental health institutions, education, business organizations and families. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 345 Human Factors: Systems Analysis and Design

This course will address the systems engineering approach to system design and the role of the human factors professional in that process. The human methods and techniques that are applied to the development of system requirements, allocation of functions to human and machine subsystems, the analysis of human task and work requirements, analysis of staffing requirements, the design control centers to support the human tasks, and methods of system evaluation, verification, and validation will be examined. This course will require students to apply the concepts and methods discussed to an actual design project as part of a design team. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 405 Ergonomics and Biomechanics

This course will examine the scientific knowledge related to human ergonomics, anthropometry, and biomechanics. The measurement of human work, physiological characteristics and movement will be presented. The application of such knowledge to the design of devices, systems, and environments for use by people will be discussed. The contribution of ergonomics and biomechanics to the improvement of safety, productivity, and quality of work will be presented. Prerequisite(s): PSY 328. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 410 Individual and Group Counseling

This course will explore what counseling is, who is a counselor, and what is known about changing behavior in both individual and group settings. Historical concepts of counseling will be examined as well as the scientific foundations of counseling. Research findings related to counseling techniques will be presented and analyzed. The course will focus on a variety of counseling approaches, the therapeutic relationship, legal and ethical issues, and the realities of therapeutic practice. Cultural influences on behavior will be emphasized as a way of understanding and helping clients from diverse backgrounds. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 414 Applied Personnel Psychology

This upper level offering is designed to provide students with the tools for understanding the underlying theory, research and techniques of personnel psychology. It will provide the background for understanding the practical application of the concepts and techniques studied. This will be accomplished through a combination of lectures, group projects involving application of the principles of personnel psychology, group presentations of the projects and classroom exercise. Prerequisite(s): PSY 331. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 420 Advance Topics in the Study of the Human Mind and Cognition

This course will provide an excursion into the most current approaches and perspectives in the field of cognitive science, neuroscience, and cultural studies. The class will cover a variety of topics such as: embodied cognition, sensory deprivation and its effects on cognition, multisensory integration, evolution of cognition and culture, and the role of cognition in rituals and religions, morality, and other topics. Prerequisite(s): PSY 272 Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 430 Introduction to School Counseling

In this course students will be introduced to the role of the school counselor and the relationship of school counseling to the educational mission of school. The following school counseling topics are addressed in this course: perspectives and practices for school counseling in the 21st century, multicultural and diversity issues impacting school counseling, and an overview of counseling theory as applied to the child and adolescent in a school setting. Candidates will explore the school counselor’s work in the context of leadership, advocacy, collaboration, consultation, coordination of services, multiculturalism and working with diverse student populations, technology and the use of data to inform decisions. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315 with a grade of B- or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

PSY 440 Human Factors Psychology/Internship/Senior Project I

This course will provide seniors in the Human Factors Concentration with the opportunity to apply human factors knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship, or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local business, laboratory, or service organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in their ongoing research or consulting. Alternatively, students may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or design project. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Human Factors Psychology Concentration. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

PSY 441 Human Factors Psychology Internship/Senior Project II

This second Internship/Senior Project course will provide seniors in the Human Factors Concentration with the opportunity to apply human factors knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship, or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local business, laboratory, or service organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in their ongoing research of consulting. Alternatively, students may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or design project. Prerequisite(s): PSY 440. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

PSY 442 Applied Psychology Internship/Senior Project I

This course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty member's ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Applied Psychology Bachelor's Program or PSY 248. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

PSY 443 Applied Psychology Internship/Senior Project II

This second Internship-Senior Project course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty members' ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): PSY 442 and PSY 260. Credits: 3 (1,0,6)

RESEARCH ALIGNED MENTORSHIP

RAM 101 First Year Seminar

This course assists new students in transitioning from high school to college. It is reserved exclusively for students in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) Program. Through group work, active listening, and class discussions, students will gain invaluable experiences navigating Farmingdale by engaging in writing, problem solving, and public speaking. The students will also learn to turn to each other and to RAM program faculty and staff for support. Note: Students taking this course may not receive credit for FRX 101. Credits: 1 (1,0)

RAM 102 Collaborative Learning Workshop

Collaborative Learning Workshops are an integral part of the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. In the Workshops, students master material in challenging foundational courses such as Mathematics. Faculty facilitators provide worksheets that students – organized in small collaborative working groups – use to solve problems while deepening their understanding of course material, acquiring strong study skills, and developing support groups. Enrollment is restricted to entering first year students who have been selected to participate in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program and who are enrolled in a foundational course to which a collaborative learning workshop is attached. Credits: 1 (1,0)

RAM 201 Sophomore Year Introduction to Research

RAM 201 is a course reserved exclusively for students in the Research Aligned Mentorship Program (RAM) that will introduce sophomores to research and graduate study in preparation for a faculty-mentored research experience. Throughout the course, students will be responsible for written reflections on scholarly journal articles. The course will culminate in a semester-long project that engages the student in writing a research proposal that requires students to read and summarize scholarly articles accessed through the college’s electronic library databases. The research proposal will be evaluated as a poster presentation which is delivered orally in class at the end of the semester. Prerequisite(s): RAM 101 Credits: 1 (1,0)

RAM 301 Transfer Year Introduction to Research

RAM 301 is a course reserved exclusively for students in the Research Aligned Mentorship Program (RAM) that will introduce transfer students to research and graduate study in preparation for a faculty-mentored research experience. Throughout the course, students will be responsible for written reflections on scholarly journal articles. The course will culminate in a semester-long project that engages the student in writing a research proposal that requires students to read and summarize scholarly articles accessed through the college’s electronic library databases. The research proposal will be evaluated as a poster presentation which is delivered orally in class at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Transfer Student Junior Level Status Credits: 1 (1,0)

RAM 303 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals. Credits: 3 (0,0,6)

RAM 306 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals. Prerequisite(s): RAM 201 or 301 Credits: 6 (0,0,15)

RAM 309 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals. Prerequisite(s): RAM 201 or 301 Credits: 9 (0,0,24)

RAM 312 Research Experience

This hands-on research experience with a faculty mentor is the culminating experience for students enrolled in the Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program. Students will be placed in research experiences on the Farmingdale Campus or off-campus in major universities, research laboratories, businesses, industry, government, horticultural gardens, and other settings that fit their academic interests and career goals. Prerequisite(s): RAM 201 or 301 Credits: 12 (0,0,33)

SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY

SET 220 Internetworking

The course will provide an in-depth understanding of internet and its applications. Lab projects will provide hands-on experience in network configuration, installation and utilization. The topical outline includes the following: internet mechanism, communication on the internet, application of internet, use of search engines, online communication, internet security, hardware for network communication, and control computer networks. Prerequisite(s): EET 104 Credits: 3 (2,2)

SET 230 Wireless Technology and Applications

The course will focus on developing the skills needed to design, build and utilize wireless networks. The topics will include function of a wireless system, basic technologies for wireless, wireless applications, wireless internet, hardware and standards for wireless networks, and building and maintaining a wireless system. Prerequisite(s): EET 104 Credits: 3 (3,0)

SET 310 Software Application for ERP Solutions

As the first of a sequence of courses, this course will provide an in-depth study of software applications in a variety of industries. Overview of engineering and business processes, concepts in enterprise resource planning and integration, and software applications for such functions as manufacturing, product life cycle management, and supply chain management will form the key topics. The focus of the course is the application, configuration of industry standard software and how to customize it for a variety of applications. Prerequisite(s): BCS 260 Credits: 3 (3,0)

SET 320 Software Application/Supply Chain Management

The objective of the course will be to develop skills and competencies to plan and implement supply chain management concepts. The primary focus will be to define, configure and apply supply chain management software. Topical areas covered will include vendor- customer roles, enterprise systems, production planning and control, capacity planning, materials requirements planning, purchasing, inventory control, shop floor control, sales and distribution, and warehouse operations and management. Industry standard software such as SAP will be used for configuration, customization and application for Supply Chain Management. Prerequisite(s): SET 310 Credits: 3 (3,0)

SET 400 Network Planning and Implementation

This course will focus on developing skills needed to plan and implement networking systems. As a higher level course, it will prepare the students to design, build and implement a network system. The course assumes that the student will have basic understanding of network requirements, network architecture, security of network systems, selection on network technologies, engineering cost estimation, and project implementation. Laboratory projects will focus on real world experience in networking planning and implementation. Prerequisite(s): EET 440 or BCS 208 Credits: 3 (2,2)

SET 402 Software Applications in Statistical Analysis and Manufacturing Management

The objective of this course is to develop competencies in the application of software for gathering and analysis of information, and preparation of scientific, technological and management reports in such functions as engineering manufacturing, banking, pharmaceutical and regulatory controls. Standard application software such as SAS will be used for analysis and reporting. Prerequisite(s): MTH 110 and SET 310 Credits: 3 (3,0)

SET 405 Software Applications in Manufacturing and Service

The objective of the course will be to develop skills and competencies to apply software for such service functions as quality management and finance, and human resources management in an enterprise. The primary focus will be to define, configure and apply software for service functions in manufacturing and service industries. Industry standard software such as SAP will be used for application customization and configuration. Prerequisite(s): SET 310 Credits: 3 (3,0)

SET 410 Senior Project

This is a capstone course which will require the student to utilize the skills and competencies gained in the program to develop and implement real world projects. With the guidance from the instructor, students may address specific problems in a company or industry and develop solutions involving software applications. Using the skills and competencies gained in software applications, the student will be able to determine research methodologies, selection of a project setting limitations for a project, defining the problem, conducting an industry study, establishing process flow for the configures system, going alive with the new system, turning over the control of the system, and providing maintenance and service support. Note: Students cannot get credit for SET 410 and 410W; SET 410W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Automotive & Mechanical Engineering Technology Department Prerequisite(s): Senior Status and Departmental Approval. Credits: 3 (3,0)

SPORT MANAGEMENT

SMT 110 Introduction to Sport Management

An investigation into the scope of the sport industry; a growing major business enterprise in the United States and in much of the world. Functions of management, skills and attributes required of a sport manager, and roles of a manager are examined and researched. Attention focuses on how the managerial process relates to sport organizations and their products. Students become acquainted with career opportunities in the sport management field. Note: Students must achieve a C or higher in this class to continue on in any course to which it is a prerequisite. Credits: 3 (3,0)