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Psychology Course Descriptions

Dr. Marya Howell-Carter, Chairperson

View current course offerings

**Courses listed below may not be currently offered** 

Course Descriptions

Courses offered by the Psychology Department have been designed to expose the student to a broad spectrum of opinion regarding the nature of human behavior. In addition to meeting the specific program requirements of Farmingdale State, the courses assist the student in understanding and coping with processes experienced on a personal and societal level. The course offerings in Psychology seek to inform, stimulate, and promote an inquisitive attitude regarding human behavior. It is hoped that as a result of exposure to courses within the Department, misconceptions and prejudices will be reduced.

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology This course is designed to present basic psychological concepts and to introduce students to the scientific study of behavior. Core topics include methods of psychological research, the biological bases of behavior, principles of learning, memory and cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Other selected topics to be covered would include the following: motivation and emotion, life-span development, social psychology, health psychology, sensation and perception, intelligence, human sexuality, statistics, and altered states of consciousness. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 230 Gender Psychology

This course will examine sex role stereotypes and their effects, research on psychological sex differences, theories of male and female development, sex roles and social institutions - how perceptions of males and females are influenced by schools, religion, and the media; and male and female approaches to sexuality, marriage, and parenthood. Readings and class discussions will be used to help students achieve a greater understanding of the female and the male experience. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 231 Group Dynamics

This course blends theory and application of the principles of group interaction and development. This is not a lecture course. Through actively participating in class exercises, students will have an opportunity to develop their sense of self in relation to others and to develop skill in effective group functioning. The general content of the course involves group formation, communication, leadership, decision-making, problem solving, goal setting, power and influence, conflict and conflict resolution, cohesion norms, and stages of group development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 232 Child Development

In this course the student will explore human development from preconception through the end of childhood. Course material will include historical and modern concepts of attitudes towards children, theories and models of child development, research methods in the study of children, genetics, prenatal development and influence, pregnancy, and birth. Within each age range the emphasis will be on factors influencing the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child. Developmental disorders, both physical and psychological, will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 233 Adolescent Development

This course focuses on adolescent behavior. The emphasis is on growth and change-physiological, psychological/interpersonal and socio-cultural. Issues of particular concern to adolescents will be presented and discussed. Some selected topics are: peer pressure, the sexual issue, the availability of drugs, establishing a separate identity, dating and relationships and finally the transition to adulthood. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 234 Social Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of how people influence each other. Topics to be covered include: liking and loving, aggression and violence, obedience and compliance, helping in emergencies, attitudes, prejudice and sexism. In addition, social perception and group behavior will be examined. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 237 Theories of Personality

The course will examine the concept of personality from four theoretical perspectives: psychodynamic, trait, learning, and humanistic. Representative theories of each perspective are discussed in terms of basic conceptualizations, methods of assessment, development, research and clinical applications. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline 

PSY 238 The Psychology of Human Sexuality

This course presents a scientific foundation for the understanding of the psychological, physiological, social, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality. In addition to studying historical changes in sexual practices and attitudes, the course will review and evaluate current research, issues and concerns about sexuality, in order to provide contemporary and relevant curriculum material. Topics include psychosexual development, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual anatomy, alternate methods of reproduction, pregnancy/birth, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sex education, sexism, love and attraction, sexual abuse, sexual dysfunctions, sex therapy, paraphilias, and sexuality through the life cycle. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 240 Health Psychology

Health Psychology is the study of psychological factors that affect health and illness. This course will apply a scientific and research perspective to the study of health promoting and health damaging behaviors. Using a biopsychosocial approach, behavioral patterns that result in cardiovascular disease, cancer, alcoholism, sexually transmitted diseases and other conditions will be explored. Course content will focus on stress and the immune system, stress management techniques, the health care system, risk taking, culture-bound syndromes, diversity issues, social support, and the role of the patient. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 242 Educational Psychology

This course will present current scientific theory and research related to formal learning environments. Individual differences in cognitive, social, and emotional development, and the implications for the teaching/learning process will be explored. These general areas will be addressed through more specific topics including growth and development, learning theories, moral development, motivation, and classroom management. In addition, issues related to teaching in a diverse society will be addressed. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 242 and 242W; PSY 242W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY242W Educational Psychology

This course will present current scientific theory and research related to formal learning environments. Individual differences in cognitive, social, and emotional development, and the implications for the teaching/learning process will be explored. These general areas will be addressed through more specific topics including growth and development, learning theories, moral development, motivation, and classroom management. In addition, issues related to teaching in a diverse society will be addressed. This course has also been designated a Writing Intensive course this semester. This means that there will be both high stakes (graded) writing assignments and low stakes (ungraded) writing assignments. The purpose of a Writing Intensive course is to have students "write to learn" and "learn to write." Prerequisite(s): PSY101. Credits 3 (3,0). 

Course Outline 

PSY 251 Developmental Disabilities: History and Service Provision

In this course, students will learn about the needs and challenges faced by people with developmental disabilities. The course will cover developmental disorders including, but not limited to, cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, and intellectual disabilities. Students will explore the social, cognitive and behavioral limitations associated with each disorder. This course will focus on understanding the complex needs of people with developmental disorders and the value of providing them with functional, supportive, and individualized services. The course will also explore the history of service provision to people with developmental disorders, the changes that have occurred in those services over the last four decades, and current standards of care. The course will outline the ethical and legal issues involved in service provision. Heavy emphasis will be placed on viewing developmental disabilities through functional and behavioral perspectives. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 252 Adult Development

This course will deal primarily with the psychological correlates of development and transitions during adulthood. Specifically, the course will focus on such topics as what it means to be an adult, the meaning of marriage, the meaning of work, being a parent, divorce, the empty nest syndrome, mid-life crisis, retirement, and facing death. Biological and social factors will be taken into consideration, as will psychological theories and individual responses to stages and passages throughout adulthood. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 253 Life Span Development

This course provides a comprehensive overview of normal human development throughout the life span. It will apply a scientific and research perspective to understanding both age-related change and consistency. The course will examine physical, cognitive, social and emotional development at every stage of life, with an emphasis on continuity and discontinuity of development as we progress from one stage of life to the next. Additionally, students will learn about those theories and research methods which are most pertinent to the study of lifespan development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 255 Special Topics in Psychology

This course will enable students to explore a specific subfield or topic of interest in Psychology, in a challenging atmosphere, with emphasis on student participation and written assignments. The subject for a particular semester will be announced prior to registration. Possible topics include but are not limited to: Consumer Behavior, Health Psychology, Psychology and the Law, Sport Psychology, and Parapsychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 257 Teaching of Psychology

This course is designed to expose students to current thinking about teaching and learning and the underlying content in the field of psychology. In addition, it aims to promote understanding of psychology as a profession as it relates to a career in academia. This is accomplished by offering students a unique opportunity to attend a professional conference on the Teaching of Psychology. During the conference students will have the unique opportunity to listen to, and participate in
presentations on some of the newest ideas in the teaching of Psychology. In many cases the presentations they hear will be the first time the ideas have been presented in public. Students will be able to observe and interact on both a formal and informal level with a group of professional Psychologists. This course is designed especially for students who have expressed an interest in continuing in the field of Psychology and/or teaching. However, it can be a valuable experience for virtually all students, regardless of their career plans. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 257 and 257W; PSY 257W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 264 Introduction to Biopsychology

This course is designed to introduce students to the biological underpinnings of behavior. The first part of the course will focus on building a foundation in neuroscience and will cover chapters on neuroanatomy (organization of the nervous system, major brain structures and their functions), neural signal transmission (how neurons communicate with each other) and sensory and motor systems (how the nervous system processes information and interacts with the environment). The second half of the course will be dedicated to understanding the relationship between complex human behaviors and brain functions, and will cover topics such as learning and memory, aging, hormones and sex, emotion, stress, health and drug addiction in the brain. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline 

PSY 265 Culture and Cognition

This course explores the methods, research, and theory in the field of culture, cognitions, and psychology in general. The main aim of the course is to introduce and familiarize students with the role of culture across a variety of psychological areas including perception, cognition, emotion, developmental processes, as well as social and abnormal behavior. The course is organized into three, inter-dependent modules. The first module concerns the exploration of culture as a determinant of one's socialization and development of personality. The second module provides an excursion into the role of culture in cognition; the way we think, perceive and organize our knowledge. The third module explores anthropological works on morality, religion, ritual, and emotion. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 272 Cognitive Psychology

This course covers the psychological study of human information processing in terms of structure, process, and application. The representation of knowledge in memory is addressed as is the cognitive processes used for information acquisition, information retrieval, and forgetting. The cognitive processes of attention, pattern recognition, language, comprehension, and thinking will be reviewed in terms of their application to cognitive activities such as decision-making, reasoning, problem solving, and creativity. The application of cognitive theory to artificial intelligence is also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

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PSY 280 Preparation for Graduate Training in Psychology

This course will provide those Applied Psychology majors who are considering graduate training in psychology with the opportunity to explore the various specialties in psychology (and related fields) as well as the graduate training required by each subfield. Students will explore their own interests while simultaneously researching and being provided with information regarding the many types of graduate training available. Self-assessment regarding standardized entrance examinations such as the GRE will be provided. Developmental plans will be generated based on self-assessment results. Applied Psychology majors who are considering graduate training are encouraged to take this one credit elective course during their sophomore year of the program. Course grading is Pass/Repeat. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101, Applied Psychology major Credits: 1 (1,0)

Course Outline

PSY 300 Forensic Psychology

This course introduces the student to the study of forensic psychology, a discipline that applies psychology to the law and the criminal justice system. Topics to be covered include: the psychologist's role in the criminal courts, ethical dilemmas of psychologists working in the criminal justice system, psychological perspective on the nature of criminality and the investigation of crime, criminal profiling, the effects of psychological empirical research on the outcome of criminal trials, and the psychology of the police, witnesses, offenders, and victims. Other new research topics in the field, such as the use of brain fingerprinting technology to determine criminal culpability will also be explored. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJ 300 and PSY 300. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 or CRJ 100. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 301 Learning

This course examines the principles and theories of learning including the methodology and evaluation of research pertaining to learning processes. Topics will include a broad range of learning paradigms, from relatively simple processes such as classical conditioning and operant conditioning, to more cognitively complex processes such as concept formation and schema development. The research describing information acquisition, transfer, and forgetting will be reviewed. In addition, the influence of conditions such as motivational factors, will be examined. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 304 Multicultural Psychology

Reflecting the 21st century global theme of acculturation, PSY 304 will focus on the ways in which the study and practice of psychology intersect with race, culture, and diversity. Topics include racial/ethnic/religious group differences, cultural norms, gender and sexual orientation issues, family, structure, and identity development. Primary focus will be given to the ways that race and culture contribute to disparities in access to mental health treatment as well as differences in beliefs about mental illness and its treatment. Consistent with an applied psychology approach, the student will develop an understanding of how diversity issues affect the workplace, i.e., discrimination in hiring/firing practices, affirmative action laws, multicultural competence, and sensitivity training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 307 Psychology of Women

This course is about being female in American culture. The purpose of the course is to examine the lives of girls and women from a feminist psychological perspective. It addresses the biological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors influencing women's behavior, thoughts, and feelings. The course is "woman-affirming" as it will examine and validate women's experiences and perspectives. The course will highlight how race, class, and sexual orientation intersect with gender to affect women's lives. Topics will include: behavioral and psychological gender differences and their origins;
concepts of femininity and gender stereotypes; pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood; women, achievement and work; violence against women; women and mental health (disparity in diagnosis and treatment); and feminist psychology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 311 Organizational Behavior

This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communications and dynamics; decision making; causes and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power and politics in organizations. Note: Students cannot get credit for PSY 311 and 311W; PSY 311W can be used to fulfill the writing intensive requirement. Note: Offered at the discretion of the Psychology Department Prerequisite(s): BUS 109 or PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 315 Abnormal Psychology

In this course the student will learn about concepts, theories, and issues in psychopathology (the study of mental illness and behavioral disorders). Topics may include historical background, mental health professionals, legal issues, normality/abnormality, etiology/assessment/ diagnosis/therapy, anxiety/stress/depression, personality disorders, sexual deviance, schizophrenia, neurological dysfunction, substance abuse, and psychophysiological disorders. The applications of psychology to personal problem solving will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 316 Atypical Development

In this course students will explore developmental deviations that result in disorders of childhood focusing on neurodevelopmental disorders (intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and specific learning disorder) and psychopathology (anxiety, mood, and conduct disorders). Developmental theories will be utilized to analyze disorders at the genetic, brain, behavioral, and cognitive levels. Emphasis will be placed on examining neurobiological and environmental factors contributing to disorders of childhood. The final portion of the course will focus on how atypical development may contribute to our understanding of typical development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 232 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 317 Organizational Development

This course examines the behavioral science based theories, strategies and interventions that organizations use to execute planned, organization-wide changes to increase organization effectiveness and health. Theoretical models and processes will be reviewed and used to evaluate an organization's capacity to improve and change. The course is structured to cover the background, process, and content of organizational development. Real–world examples of organizational development will be presented to illustrate current and best practices used by modern organizations. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (3,0) Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline 

PSY 320 Sensation and Perception

This course will survey the experimental psychology of sensory and perceptual process and behavior. Theories and processes relating the transformation of physical energies (such as light and sound) to psychological experiences (such as seeing object and hearing noises) will be discussed. While the research examined will primarily focus on the visual and auditory systems, the other sensory systems will be discussed as well. The emphasis will be on the contribution of behavioral science to understanding subjective experience of physical and social phenomena. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 321 Child Cognitive Development 

This course will examine how children's thinking develops from infancy through early childhood. Biological, social-cultural, and information processing perspectives will be reviewed in light of how cognition develops and changes over the early stages of life. This course will cover various domains of cognition including executive functioning, memory, language, intelligence, and social cognition. Finally, different populations will be considered to better understand the unique role of not only nature and nurture, but also how the two interact to influence development. PSY 232. Credits: 3.

Course Outline

PSY 324 Psychological Measurement and Assessment

An analysis of the theory and practice of psychological measurement and assessment including the implications of psychological measurement in society and institutions such as schools, the workplace, clinical populations and other groups with special needs. Topics will include overview and history of the field, foundations of psychological testing and psychometrics, the assessment of ability, the assessment of personality, the assessment of interest and vocational choice, and ethical /social/cultural issues of psychological assessment. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 325 Principles of Survey Research

This course covers the basic principles of survey research related to the design, evaluation, implementation, and analysis of surveys. Students will be introduced to the skills and resources needed to conduct quality survey research. The course is focused on the Tailored Design Method and emphasizes the customization of survey procedures for each survey situation. The course will cover the complete procedure of survey research including an introduction to different types of surveys, the development of survey instruments, an evaluation of reliability and validity, guidelines for implementation, sampling procedures, methods to increase response rate and reduce errors, and data entry, analysis, and reporting. Prerequisite(s): PSY 248 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 326 Introduction to Behavioral Health Science

Behavioral Health Science is the scientific study of the ways that human behavior can affect health/mental health status and health/mental health outcomes. Introduction to Behavioral Health Science will explore how human actions, cognitions, relationships, interactions and systems affect health, well-being, and quality of life. This course will examine the integration of mental health care and health care from a historical, practical, and policy perspective. Students completing the course will understand the significance of health care policy changes as they relate to psychology, and the dramatic shift in thinking about how and where health/mental health care can be integrated and administered. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315 Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 328 Introduction to Human Factors

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human factors psychology. Human factors psychology is the application of the body of scientific facts about human characteristics to the design, operation and organization of human machine systems. Human-machine systems can range from simple consumer products to complex arrangements of hardware, software and personnel, such as aviation systems. Human factors knowledge, methods and techniques will be surveyed with an emphasis on ensuring that the systems, equipment, personnel tasks and work environment are compatible with the human sensory, perceptual, cognitive and physical attributes of the personnel who function within the human machine system. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 330 Organizational Training and Development

An upper level offering, this course will provide a greater understanding of the theory, research, techniques, and current and future issues in the field of organizational training and development through an experimental learning approach. Topics shall include training systems, needs analysis, organization intervention, program evaluation, adult learning theory, cognitive issues, conditions for
learning transfer, instructional techniques and current social and organizational issues in training. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101, PSY 331 recommended. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 331 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Students will explore how the science and practice of psychology is applied in the world of work and organizations. Among the topics that will be examined are the history and research methodology of industrial/organizational psychology, job analysis, employee selection, performance evaluation, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, group dynamics, and organizational development. The course will highlight emerging trends in the modern workforce and examine how these changes will impact research and practice in today's organizations. Students will examine the factors influencing cross-cultural diversity and globalization, the theoretical and practical implications of these workforce trends, and how current organizational theories and practices apply to cultures outside of the United States. Implications for the full range of topics discussed in the course will be examined including how cultural diversity and globalization affect employee selection procedures, group dynamics, preferences for leadership, training needs, work motivation, and organizational development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 340 Behavior Analysis Modification

An analysis of the general principles, theories and application of conditioning and learning in humans. The application of the theories of behavioral analysis to human problems will be explored. Behavioral interventions using the principles of classical conditioning, operant conditioning and modeling will be presented. Particular emphasis will be placed on behavioral analysis and intervention in settings such as mental health institutions, education, business organizations and families. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 345 Human Factors: Systems Analysis and Design

This course will address the systems engineering approach to system design and the role of the human factors professional in that process. The human methods and techniques that are applied to the development of system requirements, allocation of functions to human and machine subsystems, the analysis of human task and work requirements, analysis of staffing requirements, the design control centers to support the human tasks, and methods of system evaluation, verification, and validation will be examined. This course will require students to apply the concepts and methods discussed to an actual design project as part of a design team. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 348 Statistics for Psychology

This course will introduce students to the basic descriptive and inferential statistics used in the behavioral and social sciences. Topics will include the organization of data, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, hypothesis testing, and various parametric and nonparametric tests of significance including t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square analysis. Students will focus on the interconnections between theory, statistical techniques, and research methods in order to identify the appropriate statistical tests to analyze data and reach objective conclusions regarding research questions in the social sciences. The course will provide practice in using statistical software for data summarization, presentation, and analysis. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and MTH 110. Credits: 4(4,0)

Course Outline

PSY 350 History of Psychology: Study Abroad in Europe 

This course will provide a unique academic and cultural excursion into the work of some of the pioneering philosophers and psychologists who shaped the development of psychology. The on-campus classroom portion of the class will cover a variety of topics including but not limited to: tracing the evolution of psychology as a science; exploring the role of European philosophers, physiologists and psychologists in shaping psychology. The study-abroad portion will expose students to the historical and cultural context of those pioneers that helped to form their philosophies and theories. Some of the pioneers whose psychological legacy will be discussed in great detail are particularly of British, German, Swiss, or Austrian origin. Prerequisites/Corequisites: PSY101, PSY130, or PSY 131 or permission of Department chairperson. Credits: 3

Course Outline

PSY 360 Research Methods

This course will present the scientific method within the context of applied psychology. Research techniques and methods will be examined for the formulation of hypotheses, development of testable objectives, experimental design, subject selection, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and report preparation. This course will focus on laboratory-based methods and simple statistical procedures for the analysis of data. Students will apply the concepts and methods in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s): PSY 348 or permission from Department Chairperson

Course Outline

PSY 405 Ergonomics and Biomechanics

This course will examine the scientific knowledge related to human ergonomics, anthropometry, and biomechanics. The measurement of human work, physiological characteristics and movement will be presented. The application of such knowledge to the design of devices, systems, and environments for use by people will be discussed. The contribution of ergonomics and biomechanics to the improvement of safety, productivity, and quality of work will be presented. Prerequisite(s): PSY 328. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 410 Individual and Group Counseling

This course will explore what counseling is, who is a counselor, and what is known about changing behavior in both individual and group settings. Historical concepts of counseling will be examined as well as the scientific foundations of counseling. Research findings related to counseling techniques will be presented and analyzed. The course will focus on a variety of counseling approaches, the
therapeutic relationship, legal and ethical issues, and the realities of therapeutic practice. Cultural influences on behavior will be emphasized as a way of understanding and helping clients from diverse backgrounds. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315. Credits: 3 (3,0)(3,0) Credits: 3

Course Outline

PSY 414 Applied Personnel Psychology

PSY 414 Applied Personnel Psychology This upper level offering is designed to provide students with the tools for understanding the underlying theory, research and techniques of personnel psychology. It will provide the background for understanding the practical application of the concepts and techniques studied. This will be accomplished through a combination of lectures, group projects involving application of the principles of personnel psychology, group presentations of the projects and classroom exercise. Prerequisite(s): PSY 331. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 420 Advanced Topics in the Study of the Human Mind and Cognition

This course will provide an excursion into the most current approaches and perspectives in the field of cognitive science, neuroscience, and cultural studies. The class will cover a variety of topics such as: embodied cognition, sensory deprivation and its effects on cognition, multisensory integration, evolution of cognition and culture, and the role of cognition in rituals and religions, morality, and other topics. Prerequisite(s): PSY 272. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 430 Introduction to School Counseling

In this course students will be introduced to the role of the school counselor and the relationship of school counseling to the educational mission of school. The following school counseling topics are addressed in this course: perspectives and practices for school counseling in the 21st century, multicultural and diversity issues impacting school counseling, and an overview of counseling theory as applied to the child and adolescent in a school setting. Candidates will explore the school counselor's work in the context of leadership, advocacy, collaboration, consultation, coordination of services, multiculturalism and working with diverse student populations, technology and the use of data to inform decisions. Prerequisite(s): PSY 315 with a grade of B- or higher. Credits: 3 (3,0)

Course Outline

PSY 440 Human Factors Psychology/Internship/Senior Project I

This course will provide seniors in the Human Factors Concentration with the opportunity to apply human factors knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship, or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local business, laboratory, or service organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in their ongoing research or consulting. Alternatively, students may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or design project. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Human Factors Psychology Concentration. Credits: 3 (1,0,2)

Course Outline

PSY 441 Human Factors Psychology Internship/Senior Project II

This second Internship/Senior Project course will provide seniors in the Human Factors Concentration with the opportunity to apply human factors knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship, or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local business, laboratory, or service
organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in their ongoing research of consulting. Alternatively, students may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or design project. Prerequisite(s): PSY 440. Credits: 3 (1,0,2)

Course Outline

PSY 442 Applied Psychology Internship/Senior Project I

This course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty member's ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): Senior Status in Applied Psychology Bachelor's Program and PSY 248. Corequisite: PSY 248. Credits: 3 (1,0,2)

Course Outline

PSY 443 Applied Psychology Internship/Senior Project II

This second Internship-Senior Project course will provide seniors in the Applied Psychology Program with the opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and methods in an actual work environment. A variety of options will be available for completion of this course: internship, research assistantship or independent project. In an internship, the student will work in a local organization. As a research assistant, the student will work with a faculty member as an assistant in the faculty members' ongoing research and/or consultation with organizations. Alternatively, the student may develop an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. The selection of which option is best will be made by the student and his/her advisor based on which option best meets the student's educational and career goals. Regardless of the option selected, each student will attend seminars and complete a research or application project. Prerequisite(s): PSY 442 and PSY 260. Corequisite PSY 260. Credits: 3 (1,0,2)

Course Outline

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