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Fall 2018 Lecture Series

The ILR Lecture Series presents sixteen lectures per year presented by experts with various backgrounds. Each member may choose up to six lectures per semester.  All lectures are held on the campus of Farmingdale State College on Friday afternoons with light refreshments following. Registration is required.

Protecting Our Presidents: Unknown Plots and Attempts on the Security of Our Presidents

CRN 10019

H&H Scholars

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Sep. 21

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm 

The United States Secret Service (USSS) has a tough job as we all know. Moreover, most people do not know what it means to be a USSS agent. This lecture will discuss how the agency has evolved over time and what it means to be an agent assigned to the presidential detail. We will present both a current and historic view of the challenges USSS agents have had over the decades in their attempt to keep our presidents safe from harm. Yes, we will examine the failures that have happened in the past, but we will also point out how attempts to do harm were thwarted.

Finally we will discuss some case studies of agents, who were assigned to the presidential detail, and the relationship they had with the first family.  We believe you will have a better understanding of the USSS and what they must deal with on a daily basis after listening to our presentation. Maximum: 90.

The Italian and Jewish Americans in War and Peace

CRN 10020

Jack Bilello

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Sept. 28

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

America has always been a nation of immigrants. This program takes us through the trials and tribulations of these "new immigrants" (late 19th century and early 20th century), and their acceptance into the main body of American society following their major contributions in World War II and beyond. Maximum: 90.

Satchmo: Louis Armstrong

CRN 10021

Marc Courtade

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Oct. 5

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

Louis Armstrong was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in the history of jazz.  Armstrong was one of the most well-known performers in the world with virtuosity on the trumpet and his distinctive raspy voice.

His style was eclectic and encompassed a wide variety of music.  His biggest hit came late in his career when he recorded "Hello, Dolly!" In 1964, he became the oldest person to hold the number one record, bumping the Beatles from the top of the charts.  Come and enjoy a look at his life and career, and hear the enduring music of Louis Armstrong. Maximum: 90.

The Andrew Sisters

CRN 10022

Joe Mittleman

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Oct. 12

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

The Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group of the swing and boogie-woogie eras. The group consisted of three sisters: contralto LaVerne Sophia, soprano Maxene Angelyn, and mezzo-soprano Patricia Marie "Patty". Throughout their long career, the sisters sold well over 75 million records (the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s). Their 1941 hit "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" can be considered an early example of rhythm and blues or jump blues. The Andrews Sisters' harmonies and songs are still influential today, and have been copied and recorded by entertainers such as Bette Midler, Christina Aguilera, Pentatonix, and others. Maximum: 90.

The Golden Age of Television: What Made the 1950s So Special for American TV

CRN 10023

Brian Rose

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Oct. 26

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

American television was all set to launch in the 1930s, but its progress was interrupted by the start of World War II.  Finally, by the end of the1940s, NBC and CBS began broadcasting to their east coast affiliates. They offered viewers a wide variety of programs: situation comedies, vaudeville-style revues, and most impressively, live original dramas.  This presentation will look at the forces that made this "golden age" such an intriguing chapter in TV history and why it was so short-lived (including brief examinations of black listing and the TV quiz show scandals). Maximum: 90.

Dame Helen Mirren

CRN 10024

Marilyn Carminio

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Nov. 2

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

Dame Helen Mirren, a megastar of extraordinary range and intelligence, was once told by a fortune teller that she would achieve her greatest success after the age of 40. Beginning her career in the Royal Shakespeare Company at 18, she would go on to make over 125 appearances in movies and television. One of 15 actresses to have won the "Triple Crown of Acting" (Oscar, Emmy & Tony), Helen Mirren has played a queen six times in her career. According to Prince William, her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II is "so convincing I should probably call her Granny."

This lecture/video presentation will highlight Helen's career and her candid personal revelations about coming of age in the turbulent 1960s, living in the limelight, her sensual screen persona, love, men, marriage, children and navigating life's journey. Warm, witty, smart, sassy, stylish, and a symbol of aging gracefully, Dame Helen Mirren is a force of nature. Maximum: 90.

The 3Bs: Brooklyn, (the) Bronx, and the Bungalows of Rockaway Beach

CRN 10025

Marjorie Gottlieb Wolfe

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Nov. 9

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

Memories are one of the secret weapons of happiness.  Reminisce with Marjorie Wolfe about the Brighton Beach Baths, Mrs. Stahl's knishes, the Brooklyn Bridge and Charlotte Russe, Little Odessa, The Bronx Botanical Gardens, Pitkin Avenue, and the Bungalows of Rockaway Beach. Maximum: 90.

American and the Amusement Park Industry: A Microcosm of Our Society

CRN 10025

Lowell Wolf

Fee: $5

Whitman Hall, 150

Friday, Nov. 16

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm

This is a three part presentation focusing first on the demise and rebirth of the Coney Island community, as a microcosm of urban decay in the late 20th century.  We will discuss how post-World War II housing and zoning policies in Coney Island led to the demise of that world renowned amusement venue, and the role the Trump Organization and Robert Moses had in its decline.  Also analyzed, the trend toward theme parks and their development in automobile accessible suburban locales.  The second portion will focus on the regulatory procedures, or lack thereof, in amusement ride industry, i.e. who polices the ride operators.  The final portion of the lecture will examine the cause and effect of political donations from the amusement park industry, including contributions from such major organizations as Disney and Six Flags. Lowell Wolf is an Assistant Professor of History, Politics, and Geography at Farmingdale State College. Maximum: 90.

For more information or to receive a brochure, contact ILR@farmingdale.edu or call 631-420-2160

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