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THE ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT HANDBOOK FOR NEW STUDENTS 2013-2014

Welcome Letter

Dear Students:

On behalf of the Academic Advisement and Information Center (AAIC), welcome to Farmingdale State College. Our academic counselors will help you develop the strong academic foundation you need to succeed at FSC.

The Academic Advisement and Information Center (AAIC) is a hub of activity, support, and essential resources dedicated to assuring the academic success of all students at Farmingdale State College.

Some of the specific ways the AAIC can assist you are:

  • Selecting courses and registering for classes
  • Understanding General Education requirements
  • Identifying and locating your assigned academic advisor
  • Selecting or changing your major
  • Declaring a minor
  • Identifying and completing important academic and administrative forms (e.g. curriculum change, course withdrawal)
  • Responding to academic alerts such as an Early Warning notice or Probationary status
  • Determining eligibility requirements for academic honor societies
  • Identifying and applying for outside scholarships

When in doubt, be sure to get correct information and guidance by turning to the AAIC. The resources contained in this handbook contain important information on everything from selecting and preparing for your classes, examples of typical first semester schedules, and listings of student support services and resources on campus.

This booklet will help you throughout your entire college career. Be sure to hold on to it. We suggest you keep it with your other important college papers so you can refer to it as necessary throughout your academic career at Farmingdale State College. In addition, you can access this handbook and a wealth of other resources at our website.

We sincerely hope you enjoy your first year at FSC. If you have any academic questions, please feel free to contact our office at any time.

Sincerely,
The Academic Advisement and Information Center (AAIC)
Greenley Library, Lower Level
(631) 794-6160
http://www.farmingdale.edu/aaic
Email: Advisement@farmingdale.edu

Planning for Your First Day of College

In order to make the transition into college a smooth and easy one, here are some important tips and suggestions to help you with your preparation:

Get to Campus Early

Figure out your commute/travel route – Before classes start, do a trial run at the time you will be going to school so you can determine how much time you will need.

Parking - Parking can be difficult on the first day. Make sure you give yourself enough time to find a parking spot.

Locate your Classrooms – It will take at least 15 minutes to walk from the parking lot to your classroom, so plan ahead. And be sure to get to your classroom early and be seated before the professor arrives.

Dress Appropriately

There will be a lot of walking on your first day, maybe every day of class. Check the weather and be sure to wear appropriate clothing and definitely comfortable shoes.

What to Bring on the First Day

  • Your schedule of classes and a campus map – It sounds logical, but you would be surprised how many people forget this.
  • Bring a notebook and pens/pencils – Again, sounds logical but you would be amazed as to how many people forget to do this. (We recommend bringing a folder with pockets for handouts. There will be handouts on the first day.)
  • Your textbooks – See the bookstore website (http://farmingdale.bncollege.com) or visit the bookstore to check what textbooks your professors have assigned. You can also access a list of your required books through a link on your OASIS account. There are many alternative ways to acquire your textbooks, i.e., bookstore, library, e-books, rentals. (Note: Don’t unwrap your books until you’re sure you have the correct ones and you know that your professor will use them.)
  • Parking Sticker – Make sure your parking sticker is in the appropriate spot on your car and you parked in the designated areas for students.
  • Farmingdale State ID card – You may need this for identification in case there is an error on the professor’s roster. It is also used to purchase/order your text books and to check books out of the library. And note: You can add money to your ID card like a debit card for tax-free food purchases on campus. Go to the Meal Card Office to the left of EcoGrounds in the Campus Center to set up your debit account for food.
  • Money – Just in case
Important Offices - Locations and Contact Information
OFFICE NAME OF DEPARTMENT AND LOCATION TELEPHONE / EMAIL
Admission Requirements Admissions Office
Laffin Hall, Second Floor
631-420-2200
admissions@farmingdale.edu
Financial Aid Financial Aid Office
Laffin Hall, Room 324
631-420-2578
faoffice@farmingdale.edu
Billing and Student
Account Information
Student Accounts Office
Laffin Hall, Room 226
631-420- 2001/2560
stuaccts@farmingdale.edu
Registration, Course Listings,
Grades and Transcripts
Registrar’s Office
Laffin Hall, Room 225
631-420-2776
regoffice@farmingdale.edu
Transfer Credit Evaluations
from HS and other Institutions
Transfer Credit Office
Laffin Hall, Room 201
631-794-6139
TSR@farmingdale.edu
Language Proficiency
Testing
Modern Languages Department
Memorial Hall, Room 204
631.420.2192
Placement Testing
Testing
Admissions Office
Laffin Hall, Second Floor
631-420-2200
admissions@farmingdale.edu
Student ID Cards
Vehicle Registration
University Police Headquarters 631-420-2111
police@farmingdale.edu
Books and School
Supplies
Barnes & Nobel Bookstore
Campus Center
631-249-3048
armingdale.bncollege.com
Library Greeley Hall 631-420-2183(circulation desk)
www.farmingdale.edu/library
Athletic Facilities and
Sports at Farmingdale
The Athletics Building
Nold Hall
631-420-2482
www.farmingdalesports.com
Food and Places to Eat FSC Dining Services
Campus Center
631-420-2055
saccoj@farmingdale.edu
Child Care and Day Camps The Children’s Center 631-420-2125
  STUDENT AFFAIRS  
Campus Housing and
Residence Life
Residence Life
Sinclair Hall, First Floor
631-420-2010/2191
reslife@farmingdale.edu
Student Conduct Dean of Students Office
Laffin Hall, Room 314
631-420-2104
Dean.students@farmingdale.edu
Student Government,
Activities, & Clubs
Office of Student Activities
Roosevelt Hall, Room 116
631-420-2677
stuact@farmingdale.edu
Student Orientation Dean of Students Office
Laffin Hall, Room 314
631-420-2104
orientation@farmingdale.edu
Student Support Services

These Services and Programs are offered Free-of-Charge

  ACADEMIC SERVICES  
Academic Advising,
Guidance, and
General Information
Academic Advisement and
Information Center (AAIC)
Greenley Hall, Lower Level
631-794-6160
advisement@farmingdale.edu
www.farmingdale.edu/aaic
Tutoring –
Foreign Languages
The Language Center
Memorial Hall – Room 200
631-420-2675
Tutoring – Math Dean of Students Office
Laffin Hall, Room 314
631-420-2104
orientation@farmingdale.edu
Tutoring – Writing The Writing Center
Knapp Hall – Room 30
631-420-2082
writingcenter@farmingdale.edu
Tutoring – Other The Tutoring Center
Sinclair Hall – Room 160
631-420-2066/ 2475
tutoringctr@farmingdale.edu
  SPECIALIZED SERVICES  
Career Guidance &
Employment Resources
Career Development Center
Greenley Hall – Student Success Center
631-420-2296
careercenter@farmingdale.edu
Disabilities Support Services Office for Students with Disabilities
Roosevelt Hall, Room 151A
631-420-2411/6174
DSS@farmingdale.edu
Health, Immunizations, & Wellness Health & Wellness Center; Infirmary 631-420-2009
wellness@farmingdale.edu
International Students & Study Abroad International Education & Study Abroad,
Laffin Hall 320A
631-420-2479
studyabroad@farmingdale.edu
Mental Health Counseling Campus Mental Health Services,
Sinclair Hall, Rm 101
631-420-2006
counseling@farmingdale.edu
New York Opportunity Program - EOP Educational Opportunity Program
Laffin Hall, Rm 315
631-420-2230
eopinquiry@farmingdale.edu
Student Success & Support Student Success Center
Greenley Hall
631-420-2480
www.farmingdale.edu/success-center
TRIO Support Services Academic Student Achievement Program (ASAP)
Laffin Hall, Room 112
631-794-6152
www.farmingdale.edu/asap
Veterans’ Services Office of Veterans’ Affairs
Laffin Hall, Room 202
631-794-6168
Eric.Farina@farmingdale.edu
Important College Terminology

Academic Probation: Students who fail to maintain the recommended grade point average (GPA) in any particular major will automatically be placed on academic probation, which is a warning that their good academic standing is in jeopardy. Students are expected to meet with faculty advisors and to seek tutoring and further assistance. While on probation, students are advised not to take more than 13 credits per semester.

Academic Suspension: Students who are on academic probation twice in succession (not including summer or winter intersession) are subject to suspension. A student who has been suspended for poor academic performance is not permitted to enroll at the College in any coursework for one academic semester (fall or spring) from the date of suspension.

Alumni: Graduates from an institution, such as Farmingdale State College.

Angel: An on-line course management system where information and assignments can be posted for on-line, hybrid, & regular courses.

Associate Degree: The Associate Degree is granted upon completion of a program of at least two, but less than four years of college work.

Financial Aid: Federal and state grants & loans allotted to students based on financial need. Several factors determine a student’s eligibility. All full-time students must be enrolled in at least 12 credits in order to qualify for and keep their financial aid. Part time students should consult with a Financial Aid Advisor.

FSG: Farmingdale Student Government – elected board of representatives who are responsible for allotting monies from Student Activities fees. The Student Government “upholds the right to improve the student’s cultural, social, and physical welfare.”

Full Time Enrollment/Part Time Enrollment: A full time student is enrolled in 12 or more credit hours in a semester. A part time student is enrolled in less than 12 credit hours in a semester.
General Education: A minimum of 30 credits in 8 subject areas. It is mandatory for all students to fulfill this requirement.

Grade Point Average (GPA): To figure a GPA, simply multiply the number of hours a course is worth by the number of points for the letter grade, then add up the totals for each course and divide by the number of credit hours. The result is the grade point average

Bachelor's Degree: The Bachelor’s Degree is the undergraduate degree offered by four-year colleges and universities (Minimum of 120 credits).

Co-Curricular Activities: Non-classroom activities that can contribute to a well-rounded education. They can include such activities as athletics, clubs, student government, recreational and social organizations and events.

Commuter: A student who lives off-campus and drives to class, or commutes.
Course Numbers: Numbers containing 3 or 4 digits used to identify courses in the course catalog and in the course schedule. For example, English 101 - Composition.

Credit Hours: Courses taken in college are measured in terms of credit hours. To earn one credit hour, a student must satisfactorily complete one 50- minute session of classroom instruction per week for a semester of not less than 15 weeks. Most courses carry 3 credit hours. Some may carry more credit hours (e.g., labs in Math, Engineering or the Sciences).

Cumulative Credits: The number of credits a student has earned.

Incomplete: Temporary grade (I) given if unusual circumstances prevent a student from completing all the requirements for a course. Student has 30 days from beginning of the following semester to complete and submit work or “I” turns to “F.” Incomplete is given at the discretion of the instructor.

Hybrid: A course where instruction is split between face-to-face meetings on campus and online learning.
Major: Subject or course of study in which a student concentrates. Usually requires a minimum of 30 credits.

Matriculation / Non-Matriculation: A matriculated student is one who has been officially accepted into a degree or certificate program and is making satisfactory progress. A non-matriculated student is one who has not been accepted into a degree or certificate program.

Mid-Term Exams (Midterms): Exams that are given approximately mid-semester. Instructors may give mid-term exams that test students on the material covered throughout the first half of the semester.

Minor: Subject or course of study that is supplemental to the principal course of study or major. Usually requires 15-21 credits. Optional.

Curriculum: A curriculum is composed of those courses prescribed or outlined by the College for completion of a program of study leading to a degree or certificate.

Drop and Add: Students are generally permitted to drop and/or add courses from their class schedules during the first week of the semester.

>Early Warning: A notice sent early each semester to students whose professors report that they are performing at less than a “C” grade level. Those students are required to meet with the instructor and with a counselor in the Academic Advisement and Information Center (AAIC).

Elective: Beyond major and General Education courses, students may take elective courses to explore their interests.

FAFSA: Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The almost universal application for financial aid, including loans, grants, college work-study and other federal and state programs. Often required before a student can be considered for scholarships.

FERPA: This act was designed to protect the privacy of students’ educational records. The Family Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students academic privacy rights.

Final Exams (Finals): Exams given during the last week of classes each semester. The type of final administered in a course is left to the discretion of the instructor.

Online Course: A course that is taught exclusively on-line via internet connection from home or campus to the SUNY Learning Network (SLN).

Registrar: The registrar is responsible for the maintenance of all academic records.
Residential Student: A student who lives on campus in a residence hall.

>Student Accounts: Department in which students pay tuition bills, obtain TAP, Title IV forms, and insurance brochures.

Syllabus: A document that outlines the important information about a course. Written by the professor or instructor, it includes important dates, assignments, expectations and policies specific to that course.

Transcript: A permanent academic record of a student. It shows courses taken, grades received, academic status and honors received.

Withdrawal: Matriculated students can officially withdraw from a class within the first 9 weeks of a semester by completing a withdrawal form available in the Registrar’s Office. Instructor’s signature is required and a “W” will appear on the student’s transcript.

Planning Your Course Schedule

See your Academic Advisor: We can’t emphasize enough how critical it is for you to see an advisor before choosing courses.

An academic advisor can help you to:

  • choose courses that meet your educational goals
  • select general education courses (required in all majors)
  • understand the requirements of your academic major
  • explore career possibilities
  • identify specific Farmingdale State College resources of particular use to you

Using OASIS to Find and Register for Courses

OASIS (Online Administrative Student Information System) is an easy to navigate online portal that students use to:

  • find course offerings
  • register for courses
  • identify required books
  • review your college transcript
  • review financial aid packages

After you have received your Ram ID number go to OASIS on https://oasis.farmingdale.edu. Follow the directions carefully – once you have logged on you can maneuver through and register for courses.

  • As you browse through listings in the online course schedule, you’ll notice that many courses have multiple sections. Sections are versions of the course that meet on different days and times.
  • Each section has a unique five-digit number called a CRN, or Course Registration Number. This is a critical number to know—you must have it to register for a course. As you choose courses, keep track of the CRNs for the sections that you want.
  • In most majors, your academic advisor will give you an alternate PIN number that you will use to enter the OASIS system. You will use that PIN to register.

Registration Generates Your E-Mail Account

You will have access to your e-mail account several days after you have first registered for classes. Check your student e-mail account frequently. This e-mail account is the main method FSC uses to send you important information. Faculty and staff at FSC will only respond to Farmingdale e-mail accounts. Do not send emails to your professors from your personal e-mail account! FSC uses Gmail for its student email. Your Farmingdale Gmail account will also give you access to a number of Google Apps, including Google Docs and Google Calendar. Log into your email at: gmail.farmingdale.edu

Immunization Alert!

All immunization forms must be submitted to the Health and Wellness Center PRIOR TO JULY 1st. If these forms are not submitted by this date, the Registrar may withdraw you from all of your courses. For further information, contact the Health and Wellness Center at: (631) 420-2014. The FAX number is: (631) 420-2137.

Placement Criteria for English

English Placement

All FSC students are required to complete EGL 101, Composition I: College Writing. Students who have taken the SAT or ACT will be placed in English courses based on their score on the essay subscore of the writing test.

  • SAT or ACT essay subscore 7 or above: Register for EGL101 Composition I: College Writing
  • SAT or ACT essay subscore 6 or below: Register for EGL 097 Basic Writing Skills (Note: EGL097 is a non-credit developmental course. This course is not applicable towards graduation and all students placed in EGL 097 will write an essay on the first day of class as a further check on placement accuracy.)
  • First-time college students who do not have SAT scores are required to take the college’s writing placement test, administered by the Admissions Office and graded by English Department faculty.

    For more information, go to the Accepted Students link on the FSC website, or call the Placement Testing Office: 631-420-2629.

    Students who arrive with University in the High School or other Transfer Credit for EGL 101 will be placed in EGL 102, Composition II: Writing Literature.

Placement Criteria for Mathematics

Mathematics Placement

Most first-time students are placed in mathematics courses based upon their performance in high school and on New York State Regents Examinations in Math. A transfer student who has received credit for mathematics courses taken at another college will be placed at the highest Math Placement (MP) level satisfied by either those courses or by the student’s high school Regents/ precalculus performance. As explained below, there are some instances where a new student will be required to take the College’s placement test in mathematics.*

Math Placement Level NYS Regents Exam Score, High School Course and / or Previous College Course Prerequisite satisfied for entry into:
MP4 Precalculus (high school grade ≥ 70 or
FSC MTH 117 – Precalculus Modeling for the Life & Social Sciences or
FSC MTH 129 – Precalculus with Applications
MTH130: Calculus I with Applications or
MTH150: Calculus 1
MP3 NYS Algebra2/Trig Regents score of ≥ 70 or
NYS Math B Regents score of ≥ 70 or
FSC MTH 116 – College Algebra & Trigonometry
MTH 117: Precalculus Modeling for the Life & Social Sciences or
MTH 129: Precalculus with Applications
MP2 NYS Integrated Algebra Regents Score of ≥ 70 or
NYS Math A Regents Score of ≥ 70 or
FSC MTH 015 – Elements of Algebra
MTH 102: Elementary Discrete Mathematical Models
MTH 103: Sets, Probability & Logic
MTH 107: Introduction to Mathematical Ideas
MTH 110: Statistics
MTH116: College Algebra and Trigonometry
MP1 None MTH 015: Elements of Algebra (noncredit)

*The following students are required to take the College’s math placement exam to determine their mathematics placement level. These students should contact the Admissions office at 631-420-2629 to schedule the exam:

  • Students who graduated from high school more than five years from the time of application for admission and had not passed any college mathematics course at time of application.
  • Students from outside New York who have not taken a NYS Math Regents Examination and who have not passed high school pre-calculus or any other credit-bearing college mathematics course.
Foreign Language Requirements and Placement

Requirements:

Farmingdale State College offers instruction in the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

The foreign language requirement for the SUNY General Education program at Farmingdale State College is as follows: baccalaureate degree students, as well as those in the associates in arts degree program, must successfully complete one foreign language course. General Education language courses include those are the following levels: Elementary I or II, Intermediate III or IV, and also specialized courses such as “Italian for Business” or “Spanish for Medical Personnel.” Bachelor of Technology programs (Horticultural Technology Management and Visual Communications: Art & Graphic Design) do not have a foreign language requirement.

Please note that - beyond the one-course General Education Language requirement – some departments require additional language study. For the following majors, the program requirements dictate that a minimum of Elementary Level II proficiency is necessary to meet graduation requirements: Liberal Arts and Sciences (AA), Applied Psychology (BS), Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement Technology (BS), Criminal Justice – Security Systems (BS), Dental Hygiene (BS), Nursing (BS), Professional Communications (BS), and Science, Technology and Society (BS).

The following provisions exempt a student from both Level I and Level II language requirements.

    • A student has documentation of completion of primary education abroad in a foreign language other than English. This documentation must include a certified translation.
    • A New York State Regents Exam score in a foreign language of 85 or above. (Note: Students who receive a Regents exam score in a foreign language of 85 or above and are thus exempt from the foreign language requirement, may be required to take a higher level foreign language course or a foreign language culture/cinema course taught in English and offered through the Modern Language Department order to satisfy the credit requirements of their major. Students should consult with their academic advisor regarding this matter.)
    • Advanced Placement examination in a foreign language with a score of 3 or above.
    • International Baccalaureate examination in a foreign language with a score of 4 or above.
    • A CLEP exam score of 50 or above.
    • An accepted score on a standardized language test offered by the College. The Modern Languages Department currently provides Proficiency Testing (credit by evaluation) in the following languages: Arabic, Bengali, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Korean, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Tamil, Turkish, and Urdu. Students who successfully pass the exam will have 3 credits in Modern Language.

If the language is not offered at Farmingdale, the student must take a language test administered by the Foreign Language Proficiency Testing Service of the New York University School of Continuing and Professional Services. If the student achieves a score of 8 or above on this test, he/she may receive up to six credits in modern language. If the student’s score is 5-7, the student must enroll in one of the Modern Language Department’s elective culture/cinema courses taught in English to complete this requirement.

If a student is certified by the College Office of Support Services for Students with Disabilities as being learning disabled in the area of foreign languages, the College requires the student to enroll in one of the Modern Language Department’s elective culture/cinema courses taught in English to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Bachelor of Technology and Associate degree candidates who choose foreign languages as one of their competency areas are subject to the above guidelines.

Placement:

Language placement is determined by the student’s record of previous high school language study and/or by scores on the NY State Regents exams, AP exams, International Baccalaureate exams, or Farmingdale departmental placement exams.

Placement guidelines include the following provisions:

  • To be eligible to register for the Elementary Level II course without having completed the Level I course at Farmingdale, a student must meet any one of these criteria:
    a) The student has successfully completed 3 or 4 years of study in that same language in high school.
    b) The student demonstrates Level I ability in a placement examination offered by the Modern Language Department.
    c) The student earned a score of 85 or higher on the NY State Regents Exam in a foreign language and wishes to continue study of that same language at the Elementary II level or higher.
  • Students with a score of 4 or higher on the International Baccalaureate Language Exam will be placed at the Intermediate Level III of that language.
  • For other new students wishing to enter language study at the Intermediate or Advanced level, such placement will be determined by the Modern Languages Department.
Academic Credits and Advanced Placement Based on Examinations and Academic Studies Completed Elsewhere (AP Exams, University in HS Courses, International Baccalaureate exams, Military Training, CLEP Exams)

Farmingdale State College provides academic credits and advanced placement for entering and current students who qualify. Qualification is typically based on (1) Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) administered by the College Entrance Examination Board, (2) College or University-Level Courses taken while in high school, (3) International Baccalaureate Examinations, (4) Military Training, and (4) approved subject examinations through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the Education Testing Service. Note: while Advanced Placement and/or academic credits are typically awarded for General Education courses, many departments do not permit students to use such credits towards required coursework in the academic major.

Students should have official documentation from any of these four sources sent to the Coordinator of Transfer Credit Evaluation at Farmingdale State College for review and possible transfer credit and/or advanced placement.

Ms. Amy Stier
Assistant Director, Transfer Services
Farmingdale State College, Laffin Hall
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale, NY 11735
631-794-6139
TSR@farmingdale.edu

Advanced Placement Examinations and Farmingdale Course Equivalencies

Advanced Placement Exam Score Farmingdale Equivalent Crdits Advanced Placement Exam Score Farmingdale Equivalent Crdits
Art-Drawing 4 VIS 101 3 German 3 GER 114 3
Art-2-D Design   Determined by art department   Human Geography 3 SSE 1XX 3
Biology 3 BIO 001 3 Italian 3 ITA 224 3
Biology 4 BIO 001 3 Language & Composition 3 EGL 101 3
Biology 5 BIO 001 4 Latin 3 Gen. Ed Lang. Requirement 3
Calculus AB 4 or 5 MTH 150 4 Literature & Composition 3 EGL 101 & 102 6
Calculus BC 4 or 5 MTH 150 & MTH 151 8 Microeconomics 3 ECO 156 3
Calculus AB or BC 3 MTH 129 4 Macroeconomics 3 ECO 157 3
Chemistry 3 CHM 152 4 Physics B 3 PHY 135 & 136 8
Comparative Gov’t & Politics 3 POL 265 3 Psychology 4 PSY 101 3
Computer Science A 4 or 5 BCS 345 3 Spanish 3 SPA 144 3
Computer Science AB 3 BCS 345 & BCS 270 6 Statistics 4 or 5 MTH 110 3
Environmental Science 3 PHY 114 3 US Gov't & Politics 3 POL 167 3
European History 3 HIS 115 3 US History 3 HIS 121 & 122 6
French 3 FRE 104 3 World History 3 HIS 126 3

College or University Courses Taken While in High School

Some students earn college credit for university courses offered in their high schools. These are sometimes called “scale courses” or “university in the high school.”

Students who have successfully earned “university in the high school” credits through Farmingdale State College will see those college credits and grades appear automatically on their FSC transcripts.

Students who earned college credits from a different college or university must take the following action to have such college credit considered by FSC for transfer toward the FSC degree. Specifically, contact the Registrar at the College and University that provided those credits. Ask the Registrar to send an official copy of your College (not high school) transcript containing your coursework and grades to the Farmingdale Transfer Credit Evaluator (see preceding page).

Students should have their college transcripts sent to FSC during the summer before the Fall semester so that their FSC records can be up-to-date.

Academic Credit or Advanced Placement based on Military Training

Students with background in the US Military (e.g. veterans of the Armed Forces and the National Guard as well as current enlistees) should have their SMART transcripts that document formal military training sent to FSC’s coordinator of Transfer Credit Evaluation (see address on preceding page) for review and possible transfer credit or advanced placement status.

International Baccalaureate Examinations

Students who have taken International Baccalaureate Examinations should have their exam scores sent to the Coordinator of Transfer Credit Evaluation for review and possible credit transfer.

IB Course Required Score Farmingdale Equivalent Credits Granted
Biology HL 3 BIO 123 4
Biology HL 4 BIO 130 4
Biology HL 5 BIO 130 & 131 8
Biology HL 6 or 7 BIO 130, 131 & 223 12
Business Management 4 BUS 109 3
Economics 4 ECO 156 & 157 6
       
English A 1 HL 5 EGL 102 3
Film 4 ART 3XX 3
Foreign Language 4 Modern Language Level II 3
History of the Americas 5 HIS 125 3
Math SL 4 MTH 129 4
Psychology 5 PSY 101 3
Social Cultural Anthropology 4 ANT 110 3
Spanish 4 SPA 244 3
Visual Arts 5 Advisement from Visual Communications Dept. required  

CLEP EXAMS

CLEP (College Level Examination Program) is a way for students to accumulate college credit by taking an exam on a subject they are proficient in instead of taking the full course. The CLEP program is administered by the College Board organization. Some colleges only administer exams to students matriculated at their school; other test centers are open for anyone. The following is a list of the course equivalencies FSC will accept:

Exam Farmingdale Equivalencies Credits Granted
American Government POL 167 3
Biology BIO 120 4
Business Law BUS 202 3
Calculus MTH 150 4
Chemistry No Credit  
College Algebra MTH 116 4
College Mathematics MTH 001 3
Educational Psychology PSY 242 3
Financial Accounting BUS 101 3
French (50 to 65) FRE 101+102 6
French (66 or better) FRE 203+204 6
History of United States I HIS 121 3
History of United States II HIS 122 3
Human Growth & Development PSY 235 3
Information Systems BCS 1XX  
Introduction to Business BUS 111 3
Macroeconomics ECO 156 3
Marketing BUS 131 3
Microeconomics ECO 157 3
Precalculus MTH 129 4
Principles of Management BUS 109 3
Principles of Public Speaking SPE 130 3
Psychology PSY 101 3
Social Sciences & History SSE 001 3
Sociology SOC 122 3
Spanish (50 to 65) SPA 141 + SPA 142 6
Spanish (66 or better) SPA 243 + SPA 244 6
Western Civilization I HIS 114 3
Western Civilization IItd> HIS 115 3

NO CREDIT FOR ANY ENGLISH OR NATURAL SCIENCES CLEP EXAMS.

For additional information go to the Transfer Services Webpage or contact the department at TSR@farmingdale.edu or 631-794-6139.

SUNY General Education Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

The Board of Trustees of the State University of New York has mandated that students in baccalaureate degrees, as a condition of graduation, complete an academically rigorous and comprehensive core General Education curriculum of no fewer than 30 credits. Students must show competency by taking at least three credit hours each in basic communications and mathematics, and will demonstrate overall competency in the areas of critical thinking and information management.

Farmingdale students in baccalaureate programs will earn 30 SUNY General Education Requirement (SUNY-GER) credits by completing one or more courses in each of the following areas:
Basic Communication
Mathematics
Humanities
Arts
American History, or Other World Civilizations, or Western Civilization
Natural Science
Social and Behavioral Science
Foreign Language

At Farmingdale, EGL 101 and EGL 102 are College requirements. EGL 101 also currently fulfills the requirement for the Basic Communication competency area. Certain baccalaureate degree programs may require additional general education courses as part of the required courses in the major.

Critical Thinking and Information Management are infused throughout Farmingdale’s General Education program. All baccalaureate programs address specific computer literacy requirements as part of the curriculum and the college catalog states: “To meet the diverse needs of its programs, and in the spirit of providing a liberal education to all students, the College requires that each student receive some type of computer instruction before being awarded a degree.”

Based on the requirements in the major, our Bachelor of Technology programs will have varying requirements which will satisfy the SUNY mandated requirements for general education. Please speak with your advisor to select the courses to satisfy the general education requirements specific to your program.

The ten General Education Competency Areas with the courses, which have been approved to fulfill the student learning objectives in each area, are listed on the following pages.

NOTE:All General Education courses that do not have prerequisites and thus are available to first semester students are highlighted in bold italics in the lists that are found on the pages that follow.

Basic Communication:
Business 141: Contemporary Business Communication
English 101: Composition 1: College Writing
English 209: Technical Communications
Speech 130: Public Speaking
Speech 201: Oral Communications
Speech 330: Technical Speech
Speech 331: Advanced Oral Communications (also dual listed as PCM 331)

Humanities:
Art 200: History of Graphic Design
Art 201: Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through Middle Ages
Art 202: Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to Present
English 201: English Literature Survey
English 202: English Literature Survey (Modern)
English 203: American Literature Survey (to 1865)
English 204: American Literature Survey (1865-present)
English 206: World Literature Survey (Classics)
English 207: World Literature Survey (Modern)
English 212: Introduction to Fiction
English 307: Special Topics in Literature
English 314: Major Authors in World Literature
English 322: Leadership in Fact, Fiction & Film
English 323: Major Authors in British Literature
Mod. Lang. 304: French Culture and Civilization
Mod. Lang. 306: Italian Culture and Civilization
Mod. Lang. 310: Latin American Women Writers
Mod. Lang. 311: Italian American Experiences
Mod. Lang. 312: Contemporary Latin American Short Stories
Mod Lang. 316: French Fables and Folktales
Mod. Lang. 320: Latino Writers in the United States
Mod. Lang. 322: The Latin American Novel
Music 108: Survey of Western Music
Philosophy 205: Ethics

The Arts:
English 200: Introduction to Shakespeare
English 210: Introduction to Drama
English 214: Introduction to Poetry
English 216: Creative Writing
English 225: Images of Women in Drama
English 228: Classics and Mythology in Popular Culture
English 240: Themes in Science Fiction in Film and Literature
English 242: Fiction to Film
English 244: Classics of Supernatural Film and Literature
English 266: Fantasy in Literature and Film
English 269: The Romantic Arts: Art, Dance, Literature & Music
English 308: The City in Literature, Art, Film and Theatre
English 309: Voices of Black America in Poetry, Prose & Song
English 319: Modern Drama
English 330: Classical Greek Tragedy: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides
English 331: Death, Madness and Sex: The Victorians
Mod. Lang. 300: International Cinema
Mod. Lang. 301: Italian Cinema
Mod. Lang. 302: Spanish-Latin American Cinema
Mod. Lang. 303: French Cinema
Mod. Lang. 307: French and Francophone Fiction and Film
Mod. Lang. 309: Arabic Cinema
Mod. Lang. 314: Hispanic Fiction to Film
Theater 233: Introduction to Theater
Visual Comm 101: Introduction to Drawing
Visual Comm 102: Interrelationship of Art & Music
Visual Comm 103: Introduction to Watercolor
Visual Comm 104: Introduction to Calligraphy
Visual Comm 105: Introduction to Photography
Visual Comm 106: Introduction to Pastels

American History:
History 121: U.S. History to Reconstruction
History 122: U.S. History Since Reconstruction

Other World Civilizations:
Anthropology 130: North American Indians
Anthropology 211: Caribbean Cultures
History 117: World Civilization I
History 118: World Civilization II
History 211: The World and Its Peoples
History 213: Peoples and Cultures of Asia
History 215: The World of Islam
History 216: History of Central Asia: From Genghis to Borat
History 233: Comparative Religions and Cultures
History 351: The Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey
Mod. Lang. 308: Arabic Culture and Civilization

Western Civilization:
History 114: Western Civilization I
History 115: Western Civilization II
History 217: From Constantine to Columbus: Western Civilization in the Middle Ages
History 231: Europe and Its Peoples
Mod. Lang. 305: Hispanic and Latin American Culture and Civilization
Politics 273: Italian Politics and Society: Theory and Practice

Mathematics: (Note: see math placement chart to determine enrollment eligibility)
Math 102: Elementary Discrete Mathematical Models
Math 103: Sets, Probability and Logic
Math 107: Introduction to Mathematical Ideas
Math 110: Statistics
Math 116: College Algebra & Trigonometry
Math 117: Precalculus Modeling for Life and Social Sciences
Math 129: Precalculus with Applications
Math 130: Calculus I with Applications
Math 236: Calculus II with Applications
Math 150: Calculus I
Math 151: Calculus II

Foreign Languages:
Note: While Level I language will satisfy the competency area, it may not satisfy program requirements; students are strongly advised to consult with an academic advisor on this particular general education area. See Foreign Language Requirements and Placement on pages 11-12.
Arabic 131: Arabic I (Elementary)
Arabic 132: Arabic II (Elementary)
Arabic 233: Arabic III (Intermediate)
Arabic 234: Arabic IV (Intermediate)
Chinese 151: Chinese I (Elementary)
Chinese 152: Chinese II (Elementary)
French 101: French I (Elementary)
French 102: French II (Elementary)
French 203: French III (Intermediate)
French 204: French IV (Intermediate)
German 111: German I (Elementary)
German 112: German II (Elementary)
German 213: German III (Intermediate)
German 214: German IV (Intermediate)
Italian 121: Italian I (Elementary)
Italian 122: Italian II (Elementary)
Italian 125: Italian for Business
Italian 223: Italian III (Intermediate)
Italian 224: Italian IV (Intermediate)
Spanish 141: Spanish I (Elementary)
Spanish 142: Spanish II (Elementary)
Spanish 145: Spanish for Medical Personnel
Spanish 243: Spanish III (Intermediate)
Spanish 244: Spanish IV (Intermediate)
Spanish 250: Spanish for Native Speakers
Spanish 251: Spanish Composition and Conversation

Social and Behavioral Sciences:
Anthropology 100: Introduction to Anthropology
Anthropology 110: Sociocultural Anthropology
Anthropology 210: Modern Anthropology and Globalization
Economics 156: Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics)
Economics 157: Principles of Economics (Microeconomics)
Economics 321: Engineering Economics
Politics 105: Introduction to Politics
Politics 250: American National Government
Politics 251: State and Local Government
Politics 262: Global Politics
Politics 277: Politics of the Muslim World
Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology
Psychology 232: Child Development
Psychology 234: Social Psychology
Psychology 235: Abnormal Psychology
Psychology 238: Psychology of Human Sexuality
Sociology 122: Introduction to Sociology
Sociology 200: *Introduction to Women’s Studies
Sociology 225: Sociology of Marriage and the Family
Sociology 226: Contemporary Marriage
Sociology 228: Society and Health for Social Science
Sociology 229: Minorities in American Society
Sociology 231: The Promise and Challenge of Multiculturalism
Sociology 238: Youth Culture
Sociology 263: Immigration Past and Present
*This course is cross-referenced as WST/HUM/SOC 200

Natural Sciences:
Biology 120: General Biology
Biology 123: Human Body in Health and Disease
Biology 125: Principles of Nutrition
Biology 130: Biological Principles I
Biology 131: Biological Principles II
Biology 135: Marine Science
Biology 166: Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology
Biology 170: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Biology 171: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Biology 192: Biology I: Botany
Biology 197: Human Biology
Biology 198: Entomology
Chemistry 111: Chemistry and Public Interest
Chemistry 112: *Chemistry and Public Interest Lab
Chemistry 124: Principles of Chemistry
Chemistry 140: Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
Chemistry 152: General Chemistry Principles I
Chemistry 153: General Chemistry Principles II
Chemistry 260: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
Physics 110: Physical Science- Physical Geology
Physics 111: Physical Science- Historical Geology
Physics 112: Physical Science Survey
Physics 113: Physical Science- Physics
Physics 114: Physical Science- The Environment
Physics 115: Physical Science- Energy
Physics 116: Physical Science- Meteorology
Physics 117: Physical Science- Solar System Astronomy
Physics 118: Physical Science- Stellar Astronomy
Physics 119: Physical Science- Technology
Physics 120: Physical Science- Extraterrestrial Phenomena
Physics 121: General Physics- Classical
Physics 122: General Physics- Modern
Physics 123: The Theory of Everything
Physics 125: **PHY Science Lab I
Physics 126: **PHY Science Lab II
Physics 135: College Physics I
Physics 136: College Physics II
Physics 143: Physics I (calculus based)
Physics 144: Physics II (calculus based)
Physics 151: University Physics I
Physics 152: University Physics II
Physics 161: University Physics Laboratory I
Physics 262: University Physics Laboratory II
Physics 253: University Physics III
Physics 333: Modern Physics with Algebra

* This Chemistry Lab qualifies for credit towards the General Education Program when taken with Chemistry 111.

** These Physics Labs qualify for credit towards the General Education Program when combined with any Physics course numbered 110 through 123. Each lab carries 1 credit.

SUNY General Education Requirements for Associate Degrees

All students enrolled in Associate degree programs are required to successfully complete 21 credits of General Education courses, specified in the curriculum, with the following exceptions:

  • Students enrolled in the Associate degree programs in Dental Hygiene and Nursing are required to complete 15 credits of general education courses, specified in the curriculum;
  • Students enrolled in the Liberal Arts and Sciences degree program are required to successfully complete all eight competency areas of the Farmingdale General Education Program, including a one-credit science lab component.
  • There is no General Education requirement for students enrolled in Associate in Applied Sciences programs.
Waivers, Substitutions, and Transfer Credit Requests for General Education Course Requirements

In some cases a student can request permission to have a general education course requirement met through one of the special types of appeals described below:

General Education Transfer Credit: A student took a course at another university that was classified as a general education course there, but is not considered as such at FSC and thus appears on the student’s FSC transcript as an elective. This student can appeal to the provost to have the elective course approved to count as meeting our general education requirement.

General Education Waiver: When a transfer student has taken and been given credit for an advanced course for which a lower-level FSC general education course would normally be considered a prerequisite, the student can appeal to have the FSC general education course waived.

General Education Course Substitution: When a student has taken a course elsewhere or at FSC that meets with spirit and intent of the FSC general education, the student can appeal to have that course accepted as a general education course at FSC.

To make such a request, the student should meet with an AAIC counselor or Academic Advisor to prepare the required forms and obtain the appropriate signatures.

Any student who is granted a waiver in a particular competency area must still complete the minimum General Education credit requirement of his/her degree program. The number of credits waived may be applied to “elective” courses in any of the ten competency areas at the student’s discretion, though the College recommends that this be done under advisement.

Final waivers and course substitutions will appear on the student’s academic record as a “comment” at the top.

Academic Departments, Majors and Typical 1st & 2nd Semester Course Schedules

Architecture and Construction Management, 631-420-2024, Lupton 261

Architectural Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• CON 101 Introduction to Technology and Applied Programming • CON 103 Surveying
• CON 111 Graphics I Programming • CON 121 Graphics II
• CON 161 Materials and Methods of Construction • CON 162 Materials and Methods Construction II
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • MTH 130 Calculus with Applications
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• Arts General Education Elective* • History General Education Elective*
Construction Management Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• CON 101 Introduction to Technology and Applied Programming • CON 103 Surveying
• CON 111 Graphics I Programming • CON 121 Graphics II
• CON 161 Materials and Methods of Construction • CON 162 Materials and Methods Construction II
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • MTH 130 Calculus with Applications
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
  • History General Education Elective*

Automotive Technology Department, 631-420-2326, Lupton 187

Automotive Technology AS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• AET 104 Combustion Engine Theory • AET 107W Mech. Equip. Eng. & Drive
• AET 106 Mech. Equip. Chassis and Suspension • AET 104 Combustion Engine Theory
• AET 109 Automotive Electrical Principles • PHY 135 College Physics I
• AET 150 Automotive Computer Applications • Social Science General Education Elective*
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus  
Industrial Technology – Automotive Management Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• AET 104 Combustion Engine Theory • AET 105 Fuel Sys-St. Eng
• AET 106 Mech. Equip. Chassis and Suspension • AET 107W Mech. Equip. Eng. & Drive
• AET 109 Automotive Electrical Principles • PHY 135 College Physics I
• AET 150 Automotive Computer Applications • History General Education Elective*
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus  

Aviation Department, 631-420-2308, Lupton 101

Aviation Administration BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• AVN 126 Aviation Security Mgmt • AVN 101 Aviation History
• BUS 109 Mgmt Theories and Practices OR BUS 111 - Introduction to Business • PHY 116 Meteorology
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • MTH 130 Calculus
• MTH 129 - Pre-Calculus • EGL 102 Composition II: Literature
• History General Education Elective* • PSY 101 Intro to Psychology
Aeronautical Science - Professional Pilot BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• AVN 104 Private Pilot Ground • AVN 106 Private Pilot to Certificate
• AVN 101 Aviation History • AVN 201 Safety Ethics
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • AVN 202 Aviation Meteorology
• PSY 101 Intro to Psychology • EGL 102 Composition II: Literature
• History General Education Elective* • MTH 129 Pre Calculus
• AVN 105 - Private Pilot Flight to Solo  

Biology Department, 631-420-2175, Hale 127

Bioscience BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• BIO 130 + BIO 130L Biological Principles I • BIO 131 + BIO 131L Biological Principles II
• CHM 152 + CHM 152L General Chemistry Principles I • CHM 153 + CHM 153L General Chemistry Principles II
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Literature
• BCS 102 - Computer Concepts and Applications OR a Language OR History or Social Science (PSY 101 or SOC 101) General Education* • BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications OR a Language OR a Social Science (PSY 101 or SOC 101) OR MTH 110 Statistics OR MTH 129 OR History General Education Elective*

Business Management Department, 631-420-2015, Thompson 127

Business Management BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• ECO 156 Macroeconomics OR ECO 157 Microeconomics • ECO 156 Macroeconomics OR ECO 157 Microeconomics
• BUS 109 Management Theories and Practices • MTH 110 or Natural Science General Education*
• BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications • BUS 131 Marketing Principles
• MTH 117 or 129**  

Computer Systems Department, 631-420-2190, Whitman 112

Computer Programming and Information Systems BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • MTH 130 Calculus I with Applications
• BCS 120 Foundations of Programming I • BCS 230 Foundations of Programming
• PSY 101, SOC 122, ECO 156 or ECO 157 • BCS 262 Data Communications OR BUS 109 Management Theories & Practices
• BCS 160 Computers, Science and Technology (if not available take BCS262 Data Communications or BCS130 Website Development I OR a General Education Elective*) • BCS 215 UNIX Operating Systems
  • BCS 160 Computers, Science and Technology (if not available first semester)

Criminal Justice Department, 631-420-2538, Whitman 163

Criminal Justice AS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • CRJ 101 Law Enforcement and Community Relations
• MTH 110 Statistics (based on placement) • CRJ 102 Juvenile Delinquency
Plus two additional courses selected from:
• CRJ 115 Computer Forensics
• Foreign Language
• SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology
• PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
• BIO 120 & 120L - General Biology with Lab
• HIS 121 U.S. History to Reconstruction
• HIS 122 U.S. History since Reconstruction
• BIO 120 General Biology
  • History General Education Elective*
Criminal Justice BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • CRJ 105 Corrections in America
• MTH 110 Statistics (based on placement • CRJ 115 Computer Forensics
Plus two additional courses selected from:
• CRJ 115 Computer Forensics
• Foreign Language*
• SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology
• PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
• BIO 120 & 120L - General Biology with Lab
• HIS 121 U.S. History to Reconstruction
• HIS 122 U.S. History since Reconstruction
• BIO 120 General Biology
  • History General Education Elective*
Security Systems BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 110 Statistics (based on placement) • CRJ 217 Computer Forensics II
• CRJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice • BIO 120 General Biology
• CRJ 115 Computer Forensics • Arts General Education Elective*
Plus two additional courses selected from:
• CRJ 115 Computer Forensics
• Foreign Language
• SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology
• PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
• BIO 120 & 120L - General Biology with Lab
• HIS 121 U.S. History to Reconstruction
• HIS 122 U.S. History since Reconstruction
• History General Education Elective*

Dental Hygiene Department, 631-420-2060, Gleeson 344

Dental Hygiene AS (For students entering directly from high school)
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• DEN 105 Dental and Oral Anatomy • DEN 102 Dental Materials and Expanded Functions
• DEN 110 Preventative Oral Health Concepts I • DEN 106 Oral Radiology I
• DEN 115 Clinical Dental Hygiene I • DEN 108 Oral Histology and Embryology
• CHM 140 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry OR BIO 166 Principles of Human Anatomy & Physiology • DEN 120 Preventive oral health Concepts II
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • DEN 125 Clinical Dental Hygiene II
  • DEN 126 Periodontology
  • CHM 140 OR BIO 166
Dental Hygiene AS (Nontraditional students)
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• DEN 105 Dental and Oral Anatomy • DEN 102 Dental Materials and Expanded Functions
• DEN 110 Preventative Oral Health Concepts I • DEN 106 Oral Radiology I
• DEN 115 Clinical Dental Hygiene I • DEN 108 Oral Histology and Embryology
• BIO 220 Medical Microbiology* • DEN 120 Preventive oral health Concepts II
• EGL 102 Composition Literature* • DEN 125 Clinical Dental Hygiene II
  • DEN 126 Periodontology
*Can be completed prior to admission to Dental Hygiene program or during summer session.

Dental Hygiene BS
Please consult with the Department Chair for customized course selection guidance

Economics (History, Economics and Politics) Department, 631-420-2739, Memorial 221

Economics – Applied BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• ECO 156 Macroeconomics OR ECO 157 Microeconomics • ECO 156 Macroeconomics OR ECO 157 Microeconomics
• Natural Science (BIO, CHM, PHY) OR Foreign Language General Education Elective* OR BCS 101 OR BCS 102 • Natural Science General Education Course(BIO, CHM, PHY) OR Foreign Language Elective*
• HIS 114, 115, 117, 118, 121 OR 122 • Social Science General Education (ANT, POL, SOC)*
• MTH 110, 117 OR 129 (based on placement)** • MTH 110, 117 OR 129 (if not taken during the first semester)

Electrical & Computer Technology Department, 631-420-2084, Lupton 246

Telecommunications Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • MTH 130 Calculus I with Applications
• BCS 101 Programming Concepts & Problem-Solving • EET 104 DC/AC Circuits
• Two Art/Science General Education Electives* • EET 105 Intro to Digital Electronics
  • Art/Science General Education Elective*
Electrical Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EET 110 Computer Applications
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • EET 113 Electric Circuits II
• EET 105 Intro to Digital Electronics • EET 118 Semiconductor Devices & Circuits
• EET 111 Electrical Circuits 1 • MTH 130 Calculus I with Applications
• Art/Science General Education Elective*  
Computer Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EET 110 Computer Applications
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications • EET 113 Electric Circuits II
• EET 105 Intro to Digital Electronics • EET 118 Semiconductor Devices & Circuits
• EET 111 Electrical Circuits 1 • MTH 130 Calculus I with Applications
• Art/Science General Education Elective*  

Liberal Arts Sciences Department, 631-420-2084, Lupton 246

Please contact the Department for academic advisement.

Mathematics Department, 631-420-2182, Whitman 180A

Mathematics – Applied BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
Financial Track  
• MTH 150 Calculus I • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • MTH 151 Calculus II
• Humanities General Education • Social/Behavioral Science General Education*
• History General Education • Arts General Education*
Traditional Track  
• MTH 150 Calculus I  
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing  
• Humanities General Education*  
• History General Education*  

Mechanical Engineering Technology Department, 631-420-2326, Lupton 187

Mechanical Engineering Technology AS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus • MET 127 Advanced Manufacturing Processes
• MET 104 CADD • MET 205 Material Science
• MET 109 Computer Programming and Applications • MTH 130 Calculus w Applications
• MET 117 Manufacturing Processes • PHY 135 College Physics I
Social Science General Education Elective  
Mechanical Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus • MET 127 Advanced Manufacturing Processes
• MET 104 CADD • MET 205 Material Science
• MET 109 Computer Programming and Applications • MTH 130 Calculus w Applications
• MET 117 Manufacturing Processes • PHY 135 College Physics I
• History General Education Elective*  
Software Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 116 College Algebra and Trigonometry • BCS 120 Foundations of Computer Programming I
• BCS 101 Programming Concepts and Problem Solving • Technical Elective
• History General Education Elective* • MTH 129 Pre-calculus
• Social Science General Education Elective* • Social Science General Education Elective*
Manufacturing Engineering Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus • MET 127 Advanced Manufacturing Processes
• MET 104 CADD • MET 205 Material Science
• MET 109 Computer Programming and Applications • MTH 130 Calculus w Applications
• MET 117 Manufacturing Processes • PHY 135 College Physics I
Social Science General Education Elective  
Facility Management Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• MTH 129 Pre-Calculus • BUS 102 Accounting II
• BUS 101 Accounting 1 • MTH 130 Calculus with Applications
• MET 104 CADD • PHY 135 College Physics I
• MET 109 Computer Programming and Applications • PHY 135 College Physics I
  • History General Education Elective*

Medical Laboratory Technology Department, 631-420-2257, Gleeson 304

Medical Technology AS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• CHM 152 General Chemistry 1 • CHM 153 General Chemistry II
• BIO 130 Principles of Biology I • BIO 166 Anatomy and Physiology
• MLT 105 Medical Laboratory Techniques • MLT 227 Immunology and Serology
• General Education Elective • General Education Elective
Medical Technology BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• CHM 152 General Chemistry 1 • CHM 153 General Chemistry II
• BIO 130 Principles of Biology I • BIO 166 Anatomy and Physiology
• MLT 105 Medical Laboratory Techniques • MLT 227 Immunology and Serology
• History General Education Elective • Social Science General Education Elective

Nursing Department, 631-420-2229/2121, Gleeson 347

Nursing BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • PSY 232 Child Development
• Modern Language I • Modern Language II
• BIO 170 Human Anatomy and Physiology I • BIO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
• NUR 110 Foundations of Nursing Practice I • NUR 111 Foundations of Nursing Practice II
• SOC 228 Society and Health • History General Education Elective*

Ornamental Horticulture Department, 631-420-2113, Thompson 202

Landscape Development AAS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• BIO 192 Biology I: Botany • HOR 104 Horticulture II
• HOR 127 Horticulture Seminar • HOR 212 Woody Plants II
• HOR 110 Horticulture I • HOR 133 Landscape Drafting II
• HOR 211 Woody Plants I • HOR 101 Soil Science
• HOR 131 Landscape Drafting I  
General Horticulture AAS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• BIO 192 Biology I: Botany • HOR 101 Soil Science
• HOR 127 Horticulture Seminar • HOR 104 Horticulture II
• HOR 110 Horticulture I • HOR 212 Woody Plants II
• HOR 211 Woody Plants I • HOR 218 Indoor Plants
• HOR Elective  
Horticulture Technology Management BT
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• BIO 192 Biology I: Botany • BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications
• HOR 127 Horticulture Seminar • CHM 124 Principles of Chemistry
• HOR 110 Horticulture I • HOR 101 Soil Science
• HOR 211 Woody Plants I • HOR 104 Horticulture II
• HOR Elective  

Professional Communications Department, 631-420-2321, Knapp 19

Professional Communications BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• Foreign Language Level I * • Foreign Language Level II*
• American History 121 or 122 OR Other Worlds OR Western Civilizations* • American History 121 or 122 OR Other Worlds OR Western Civilizations*
• Math or Natural Science* • Math or Natural Science*
• Social and Behavioral Science* • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Psychology Department, 631-420-2725, Knapp 46

Please contact the Department for academic advisement.

Sport Management Department, 631-420-2786, Thompson 129

Sport Management BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • BUS 102 Accounting II
• BCS 102 Computer Concepts and Applications • SMT 110 Introduction to Sport Management
• ECO 156 Macroeconomics OR ECO 157 Microeconomics • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• BUS 109 Management Theories and Practices • MTH 117 Pre-Calculus or MTH 129 Pre-Calculus with Applications (4 crs)
• BUS 101 Accounting I • SOC 122 Introduction to Sociology

Science, Technology & Society Department, 631-420-2220, Meomorial 114

Science, Technology & Society BS
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• Math* (MTH 107 Intro to Mathematical Ideas, MTH 110 Statistics, OR MTH 117 Pre-Calculus Modeling for the Life and Social Sciences)* • A second General Education U.S. History to / since Reconstruction (HIS 121 or HIS 122), OR Western Civilization (HIS 114 or 115), OR World Civilization (HIS 117 or 118)
• Foreign Language** • Foreign Language Level II
• A Social and Behavioral Sciences General Education Elective* • Natural Science General Education (4 credits)*
• A History General Education Elective* • BCS 160 OR BCS 130 OR BUS 109 OR BUS 111 OR SMT 110

Undeclared Major Department, 631-420-2638, Meomorial 132

Undeclared Major
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• English ** • Student specific depending on career goals, first semester GPA, and degree program prerequisites.
• Math Elective **  
• Social or Behavioral Science Elective*  
• Foreign Language, Natural Science, or History General Education Elective*  
• A course in your career area of interest  

Visual Communications Department, 631-420-2181, Hale 156

Visual Communications BT
Typical First Semester Schedule Typical Second Semester Schedule
• EGL 101 Composition I: College Writing • EGL 102 Composition II: Writing Literature
• VIS 110 Drawing I • VIS 115 Three-Dimensional Design
• VIS 112 Two-dimensional Design • VIS 120 Drawing II (pre-req 110)
• VIS 114 Principles of Color • VIS 122 Typography I (pre-req 112, 116)
• VIS 116 Digital Media & Methods  

* General Education Electives must be chosen from the lists on pages 18-22.

** Placement in Math, English and Language is based on the criteria explained on pages 9-11.

Academic Minors

Farmingdale State College students are invited to enhance their studies with an “Academic Minor.” A minor is a cluster of thematically related courses drawn from one or more departments. In addition to department-based minors (e.g. Computer Programming & Info Systems), interdisciplinary minors are also available (e.g. legal studies). A minor is considered to be an optional supplement to a student’s major program of study. Only students in Baccalaureate degree programs can apply for minors. A minor consists of 15 to 21 credits. At least 12 of those credits must be in courses at the 200 level or higher. Students are only permitted to take more than one minor with the appropriate written approval of their curriculum Dean.

Students must make application for an academic minor through the department offering the minor in conjunction with the Office of Auxiliary Enrollment Services. Specific course work must be determined in consultation with a faculty member in the department offering the minor. A statement of successful completion of each academic minor will appear on the student’s transcript at the time of graduation.

Minors Department
Applied Mathematics Mathematics Department
Aviation Administration Aviation Department
Aviation Flight Aviation Department
Biology Biology Department
Business Management Business Management Department
Chemistry Chemistry Department
Computer Programming & Information Systems Computer Systems Department
Economics History, Economics, & Politics Department
English Literature English/Humanities Department
History History, Economics, & Politics Department
Italian Studies Modern Languages Department
Latin American Studies Modern Languages Department
Legal Studies Business Management Department
Management Information Systems Computer Systems Department
Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies History, Economics, & Politics Department
Organizational Leadership Business ManagementDepartment
Ornamental Horticulture Ornamental Horticulture Department
Politics History, Economics, & Politics Department
Sociology Sociology/Anthropology Department
Sport Management Sport Management Department
Web Development Computer Systems Department
Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Sociology/Anthropology Department
Academic Honor Societies

Alpha Phi Sigma
Alpha Phi Sigma is the only National Criminal Justice Honor Society for Criminal Justice majors. The society recognizes academic excellence of undergraduate, graduate students of criminal justice, as well as Juris Doctorate. Students at Farmingdale must have declared the Criminal Justice Security Systems bachelor program as their major, have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.2 and a minimum Criminal Justice grade point average of 3.2. Additionally, students must have completed at least 36 credits, and of those, 16 credits would be Criminal Justice courses. Students must be within the top 35% of their class.

For more information, please go to: www.alphaphisigma.org.

Chi Alpha Epsilon
Chi Alpha Epsilon is a National Honor Society dedicated to recognizing the academic achievements of students admitted to colleges and universities through non-traditional criteria. Its purpose is to promote continued high academic standards, foster increased communication among members, and honor the academic excellence of those students admitted to college via developmental programs. Gamma Eta is the local chapter chartered at Farmingdale State College on December 6, 2001.

To be eligible for membership consideration, students must hold a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 for two (2) consecutive, full-time semesters and have been admitted to Farmingdale State College through the Educational Opportunity Program. National link: www.xaehonor.org.(Eligible alumni who have graduated with a 3.0 or better cumulative grade point average, prior to the formation of a campus chapter, may also be considered for alumni membership.)Application forms may be obtained from the Educational Opportunity Program office.

Epsilon Pi Tau
An International Honor Society for professions in technology, Epsilon Pi Tau recognizes academic excellence of students in fields devoted to the study of technology and the preparation of practitioners for the technology professions. In addition to a recognition program that extends through members’ careers and beyond, Epsilon Pi Tau continually seeks to serve, support, and strengthen the technology professions through publications, conferences, thought leadership, and alliances with corporations, professional associations, government agencies, and nongovernmental organizations.

To be eligible for consideration, students must meet criteria as established by the honor society. Information may be obtained at www.epsilonpitau.org. Applications for membership will be mailed to eligible students, by the Dean’s Office, School of Engineering Technology.

Golden Key
Golden Key is a mission focused, values based and demographics driven organization. With 30 years of rich tradition, Golden Key remains committed to scholarship, career development, leadership and service. Our mission defines who we are; our core values provide us guidance in executing our activities; and our history reminds us that nearly two million members are counting on us to shape the future through our strategic planning process.

To be eligible for consideration, students must meet criteria as established by the honor society. Information may be obtained at www.goldenkey.org - Applications will be mailed to eligible students.

Lambda Tau National Medical Technology Honor Society
The Farmingdale State MLT program has established a chapter of this Society at Farmingdale for those students achieving exceptional academic standing while enrolled in the MLT curriculum. The purposes of this Society are to develop a spirit of cooperation and unity among the students entering any of the fields encompassed by medical laboratory technology; to stimulate a higher ideal for scholastic effort, to encourage research, and to help develop the professional character of the work itself; and to interest other students in these fields. Those MLT students achieving a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or better in their MLT courses at the completion of the third semester will be invited into the Society membership by the Faculty Advisor of the College chapter.

Omicron Delta Epsilon
Omicron Delta Epsilon is an International Honor Society in Economics. Its objectives are: (1) to confer distinction for high scholastic achievement in economics; (2) to stimulate and promote student interest in all aspects of economics; (3) to publish an official journal to be entitled “The American Economist”; and (4) to sponsor the Fisher-Taussig Award Competitions. Membership is opened to students who satisfy the following criteria: (1) in residence at least one semester, with a major or minor in economics; (2) Twelve semester (term) hours of economics, and (3) An average of B or better and a class standing in the upper one-third.

Application forms are available at the Department of History, Economics and Politics.

Phi Alpha Theta
Phi Alpha Theta is the National History Honor Society that recognizes academic distinction for students interested in the field of history. Less than 1% of students attending the college qualify for membership in this society. The mission of Phi Alpha Theta is to promote the study of history through the encouragement of research, good teaching, publication and the exchange of learning and ideas. We bring students and faculty together for intellectual and social exchanges that promote research, presentations and publications by our members in a variety of ways. The faculty officer will invite students who have a GPA of 3.0 overall and have completed four history courses with a GPA of 3.1 to join Alpha-Omicron-Iota, the Farmingdale chapter of Phi Alpha Theta.

Phi Theta Kappa
One of the highest honors a Farmingdale student may receive is election to Phi Theta Kappa, the National Junior College Honorary Scholastic Society. Mu Omega is the local Farmingdale chapter.

To be eligible for consideration, students must be matriculated in an associate degree program, have completed a minimum of 24 credits, and have achieved a minimum cumulative average of 3.5. Students will not be accepted for membership after they have completed degree requirements. National link: www.ptk.org.

Applications will be mailed to eligible students.

Sigma Phi Alpha
Sigma Phi Alpha is a National Dental Hygiene Honor Society that promotes and recognizes scholarship, service, and leadership among students and graduates of dental hygiene educational programs. The local component chapter at Farmingdale State College is Alpha Mu. To be eligible for membership, students must rank within the top 10 percent of either the sophomore class for the Associate Degree or the senior class for the Bachelor Degree. Membership in the society is offered by the faculty officers of the society.

Sigma Beta Delta
The purpose of Sigma Beta Delta is to encourage and recognize scholarship and achievement among students of Business Management and Administration, and to encourage and promote personal and professional improvement and a life distinguished by honorable service to humankind. To be eligible for membership, a Business Management student must rank in the upper 20 percent of the junior or senior class and be invited to membership by the faculty officers. Faculty officers operate the Sigma Beta Delta chapter for the mutual benefit of students. Farmingdale State College’s Business Management Bachelor of Science degree sponsors a chapter of Sigma Beta Delta. National link: www.sigmabetadelta.org.

The Farmingdale Nursing Honor Society
The Farmingdale Nursing Honor Society supports the learning, knowledge and professional development of nurses committed to making a difference in health globally. The goal of the Nursing Honor Society is to create a community of nurses who lead by using knowledge, scholarship, service and learning to improve the health of all individuals. To be eligible for membership consideration, students must be enrolled in the Bachelor degree nursing program and have completed one half of the nursing program. Students must be within the upper 35% of their class. Students who have graduated may apply as community nurse leaders.

Application forms are available in the Nursing Department Office.

Academic Integrity Policy

Each member of the Farmingdale State College campus community is expected to maintain academic integrity. Farmingdale State College has developed regulations concerning academic dishonesty and integrity to protect all students and to maintain an ethical academic environment. This includes prohibiting any form of academic dishonesty as outlined below. Academic dishonesty cannot be condoned or tolerated in a college community. Such behavior is considered a violation of the Student Code of Conduct, and students found guilty of committing an intentional act of fraud, cheating or plagiarizing will be disciplined and face penalties. The College regards academic dishonesty as an intentional act of fraud, in which a student seeks to claim credit for the work or efforts of another individual without correct documentation, or uses unauthorized, undocumented or fabricated information in any academic exercise. The College also considers academic dishonesty to include forging of academic documents, intentionally impeding or damaging the academic work of others, or assisting other students in acts of dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is divided into four categories which are defined as follows:

  • Cheating: Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials (including all electronic devices), information or study aids in any academic exercise.
  • Fabrication: Unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Knowingly helping someone commit an act of academic dishonesty.
  • Plagiarism:Intentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise. This includes words or ideas in either print or electronic format.

Academic dishonesty is morally wrong, and such behavior interferes with learning and intellectual development. Therefore, all members of the campus community have the responsibility to prevent dishonesty, protect honest students, and enforce campus policies. These responsibilities include but are not limited to the following:

  • Faculty members have the responsibility to establish standards of academic integrity and disciplinary policies in cases of academic dishonesty (consistent with the standards and policies of the College) and to include a statement of those standards on their course syllabi.
  • Students have the responsibility to abstain from academic dishonesty or facilitating the dishonest behavior of others.

Violation of the academic integrity policy is strictly prohibited and may result in a disciplinary action ranging from a warning letter to probation, suspension, or dismissal from the College with a permanent transcript notation. Please refer to the Student Code of Conduct Article IV and V. It is strongly recommended that any violation of the academic integrity policy be reported to the Dean of Students. Individual Departments are encouraged to establish appropriate disciplinary procedures and to make certain that the criteria are understood and enforced by both full-time and part-time faculty.

 

FAQs – Frequently Asked Questions by First Semester Students

What is the procedure for dropping and/or adding a course?

Students are permitted to DROP a course from their schedules or DROP and ADD a substitute course prior to the start of the semester, and also during the first week of each new semester.

That process can be done on-line through the OASIS system or at the Registrar's office. A course dropped prior to or during the first week of classes will not appear on your transcript.

What is the procedure for withdrawing from a course?

During the period from the second week through the end of the ninth week of the semester, students are permitted to WITHDRAW from courses.

  • A student wishing to withdraw from a course must obtain a withdrawal form from the Registrar's office.
  • The student should complete the course withdrawal form, obtain the instructor's signature with verification of the date of last attendance, sign the form, and return it to the Registrar's office for processing.
  • A grade of "W" will be given to a student who officially withdraws from a course.

IMPORTANT:
If you receive Financial Aid, please note that full-time status (12 credits or more) must be maintained in order to receive financial aid. If you are receiving financial aid, be sure to talk to someone from the Financial Aid Office before withdrawing from a course. You do not want to jeopardize your aid by dropping below 12 credits.

Withdrawal after the 9th week of the semester is permitted only under extenuating circumstances at the discretion of the instructor.

Always talk with your professor before you drop from their class. It is also best to speak with your academic advisor or with a counselor in the AAIC before making the final decision to withdraw from a course.

How do I change my major?

Your first step is to talk with your current Department Chairperson. The Chairperson will advise you of the necessary steps to take.

You will then want to set up an appointment with your desired Major's Chairperson. Topics that will need to be discussed are:

  • Is there space to be enrolled in the program?
  • Do you have the proper GPA to be accepted?
  • How will the courses you have already completed apply to degree and major requirements in the new major?

If approved, you and the chairperson of your new department will complete an "Application for Change of Curriculum " that will be processed by the Registrar.

Note: if you are simply contemplating a change in major and want to determine the impact of that change in curriculum on your prospects for graduation, you are welcome to meet with the counselors in the AAIC for general guidance.

Words of Advice from Upper-Class Students

On choosing courses and picking a major:

“In the beginning, I did not want to get advised by my department because I thought it was a waste of time and I could do it by myself online. But I quickly realized that I should not have been doing it on my own. Incoming freshman should stay organized and know what they need in order to fill their credentials. If they do that, they should have a worry-free four years here at Farmingdale!”
Kerrie Olson, Professional Communications

“You need to make sure you know what major you are taking. In addition to talking to your teachers and advisor, ask questions of students or alumni with that major. Look into programs like study abroad.”
Emmanuel Coffy, Applied Economics

“Pick a major based on your interest. Once you do, stick with it so you don’t end up taking a semester of classes where the credits won’t count for your new major.”
Jonathan Ditaranto, Computer Programming and Information Systems

“I would tell new freshmen to familiarize themselves with the program that they want to be in and make sure they are being guided on the right path. Is important to ensure they are taking the right classes and should be aware of all of their options.”
Amanda Gurr, Science, Technology & Society

On academic success:

“From the beginning of your first semester, be disciplined with your work and develop good time management skills. Speak to your professors and get to know them. Listen to their advice, however silly they may seem to you. Most importantly, stay motivated and take advantage of all extra credit assignments.”
Romano Wilson, Aviation Administration

“Talk to your professors. They are there to help you. Gaining some kind of relationship with them shows your interest in the subject and can only help you along the way.“
Kiersten Daly, Professional Communications

“Professors are there to help you succeed, not fail. They have set office hours, but are willing to extend them sometimes. Always go in for extra help.”
Katie Kefalas, Business Management

“College is nothing like high school. Do not slack and hope your professor will let things slide or offer extra credit to you because "you're a good student". Do not procrastinate and save everything for the last minute. Keep track of the classes you skip and make sure that you are not falling behind. If possible, do not skip at all, but if you must miss class, let your professor know beforehand. Utilize the school e-mail! Keeping in contact with your teacher will benefit you. Remember the syllabus and the criteria for your course. College will treat you as an adult, because in the real world no one holds your hand to walk you through tough times.”
Noelle Flores, Professional Communications

“Schedule your classes as conveniently as possible. If you are not a morning person, don’t take morning classes. Also, schedule your classes around your work schedule so that you have enough free time and time to do your homework. Make sure you manage your time well.”
Tina French, Business Management

“Time management is very important. You have to plan everything in advance. Study hard and don’t fail a class: it is a waste of your money and time. Take numbers from people in your class in case you are absent and take advantage of extra help from your professors, peers and tutors.”
Christine D’Amico, Science, Technology & Society

“Use the resources like the writing and tutoring centers.”
Michael Alba, Science, Technology & Society

“Use proper grammar!”
Sonia Lysek, Business Management

“Utilize online databases in Greenley Library. They have peer reviewed material that professors like.”
Catharine Brinkman, Science, Technology & Society

“This isn’t senior year of high school. Showing up 20 minutes late with Starbucks and big sunglasses won’t cut it. You’re in college now. In order to succeed you must put everything you have into it. Do your work, show up, and study hard. I’m not saying don’t go out and have fun, but remember now it counts for the real world. Good luck!”
Spencer Wunsch, Business Management

On making the most of your college experience:

“Become friends with classmates that are in your major. It helps during your four years to have friends in your classes, and you'll have friends for life.”
Katie Mergl, Professional Communications

“Get involved in campus activities. You won’t have fun if you don’t look for it. Be open to meet new friends on campus. You can also make new friends and find out what’s going on in the Farmingdale Facebook Class of Groups.” Peter Velez, Computer Engineering Technology

“I’m looking forward to the opportunity to study abroad. From all the things I have heard it sounds like amazing. I strongly recommend it.”
Corinne Dodge, Liberal Arts & Sciences

“Everyone is or has been in the same vulnerable position as you are as a freshman, so don't be so nervous! At the beginning of the semester everyone acts tough and isn't too friendly, but be open minded and you will make friends by showing your true personality.”
Danielle Cox, Business Management

“Remember that you chose to go to college, so commit yourself to your choice and work hard.”
Kevin Nolan, Science, Technology & Society

Plan Ahead for Your Next Four Years of College

First year – The first year of college is full of changes and challenges. The following suggestions will help make the transition into college life a successful one.

  • Take advantage of the tutoring services available before grades go down!
  • Balance and Budget Your Time effectively- Use your syllabus as a guide to plan your semester.
  • Get to know your professors, your advisors, the AAIC, & student support services on campus.
  • Get involved in campus activities! The more you get involved the more opportunities will present themselves to you.
  • Check your FSC email frequently for any campus event news, financial aid account changes, and correspondence from faculty and advisors.
  • Explore interests, values and skills by participating in clubs, student activity events on and off campus, volunteer, explore courses that interest you, not only ones from your major, and most importantly, get to know what you like and don’t like.

Second year - You have a full year under your belt and are more familiar with the campus, school activities and have made the beginnings of lifelong friendships. It is a good time to start exploring career ideas and making a decision on what major you want to pursue.

  • Get to know your career center. Take assessment tests to help clarify careers best suited to meet your likes, interests and personality traits.
  • Talk to professors that instruct topics you are interested in. Ask to participate in any research or community programs they may be a part of to gain understanding of career opportunities in their fields.
  • Continue to participate in campus clubs, student government and campus activities. Get involved. If you don’t like any of the clubs available, start one!
  • Help a cause you feel strong about, volunteer. Volunteering is not only good for the community but good for the volunteer. It opens up potential careers, provides a great opportunity to meet new people and expands the soul.

Third Year – Time to consider a plan of action for when you graduate next year.

  • Meet with academic advisors to ensure core and major requirements are met in order to graduate on time.
  • Start exploring graduate schools if your field of interest requires it. Be sure to talk with your academic advisor about prerequisites, entrance exams and graduate applications.
  • Continue to explore interests through electives, clubs, campus/off campus volunteer opportunities and most importantly internships!
  • Now is a good time to start seeking internships. Your major’s department should have an internship liaison or coordinator who can help you with your applications. Begin to build your resume, the career center can help.
  • Register for a study abroad program. Emersion in another culture not only provides new ideas, new sensations and new relations, it challenges you to reach outside your comfort zone, where growth and self-awareness occur.
  • Get involved in industry associations. Most offer student membership at a discounted rate and provide a wealth of resources in your field, including mentorship programs
Places to Eat and Meet

Food / Coffee:

  • Campus Center Restaurant: You'll find an abundant variety of fresh foods, prepared from scratch each day. Many foods are prepared right before your eyes - only moments before serving. Our chefs prepare a changing menu of specialties including hand-tossed pizza, Asian cuisine, grilled sandwiches, daily baked desserts, and so much more.
  • Campus Center Market: Offering a number of great stations from which to get a delicious meal: the Burger Studio, Asian inspired Street Food, Home for traditional entrees, Salads made-to-order at Greens to Go, In Between for sandwiches and wraps, and TCP for wood stone oven pizzas.
  • Eco Grounds: (Campus Center) Need a comfy spot to hang out? Grab a cup of coffee and relax on our couches. We can even satisfy your hunger with gourmet desserts and pastries. Now serving fresh brewed coffee from the Java City EcoGrounds brand.
  • Books n’ Beans Café (Greenley Hall Library): Spice up your day with a frothy latte or an espresso at our Books n' Beans Café. This café is located at the Success Center.

Visit the campus website for hours and menus of all campus eateries: http://www.campusdish.com/en-us/CSE/Farmingdale

Note: The Aramark Food service offers meal plans for both residential and commuter students.

Places to Study / Meet:

  • Bunche Plaza
  • Campus Center
  • Gleeson Hall, lounge areas on the third and fourth floors
  • Greenley Hall Library, study rooms and lounge areas throughout the building
  • Hale Hall, first floor lounge area with vending machines; second floor lounge area
  • Laffin Hall, first floor lobby lounge area with vending machines
  • Lupton Hall, first floor lounge area with vending machines; second floor lounge area
  • Roosevelt Hall Lobby
  • Sinclair Hall
  • Whitman Hall, first floor lounge area with vending machines
Open Computer Labs and Lounges
  • Books n’ Beans Café and adjacent Success Center (Greenley Hall)
  • Greenley Hall Library, first floor
  • Laffin Hall, first floor lobby and lounge
  • Whitman Hall – large open lab, room 221 – smaller open lab, room 115

Student Schedule Planner

The Academic Advisement Handbook for New Students 2013-14 (Printable PDF File)