Writing in the Disciplines

 

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Application to Teach Writing-Intensive Course

Dr. Catherine Akel
English & Humanities Dept.
October 26, 2006

EGL 242W:  Film and Literature
(3 credits)

Course Objective
This course aims to develop students’ understanding and appreciation of both film and literature through reading literary works and viewing film adaptations of these works.  As a writing intensive class, students will complete two five- to six-page papers, mid-term and final exams, and short writing assignments in and outside class.

High-stakes Writing Assignments
Two five- to-six page papers are required, plus a Works Cited page.  They are to be prepared in the MLA Format, size 12 font.

These papers are documented essays (rather than research papers).  The material will consist primarily of student opinions and insight into the movies and texts used in class with supporting materials, such as book or film reviews, perhaps an article (scholarly or “popular”) about the movie and/or book, etc. 

The papers may consist of a critical review or an analysis of the text and movie and/or additional versions of the movie, how the movie does or does not conform to the text, why and how the movie was adapted, whether or not the adaptation was successful, a comparison to a remake of the movie or to a version of the movie that was produced earlier, how these movies are or are not successful adaptations of the text; students may come up with their own topics regarding the movie and book as well. 

Papers should be revised as appropriate.  Revised papers are due one week after the return of the original paper to the student. 

Low-stakes Writing Assignments
Low-stakes assignments will include pre-writing assignments focused on the texts.  Assignments will be due on the first day of discussion of the text and movie.  The focus of the assignment will be on a thorough reading of passage(s) in the text that are crucial to a discussion of the text and movie adaptation.  Also, there will be an occasional short in-class writing in response to texts and lectures.  These writings will be assigned during the on-going discussion of the text and movie and/or at the completion of discussion of the text and movie.

Mid-term and Final Exams
The Mid-term and Final Exams will be [in class] essays based on the movies, texts, and class  discussions. 


Grading Policy & Term Assignments:

  • Participation is heavily weighted in the final grade.  This includes reading the assigned texts and being prepared to discuss them in class.
  • Papers are due IN CLASS on the assigned day.  If you are absent, have someone else bring it or leave assignments in my mailbox before class time. (See e-mail directions below.)  Papers handed in on time may be revised.  Revised papers are due back one week from the day they are returned.
  • Absence from class on the due date of a paper is no excuse.
  • Grading:
    • 40%     Two documented essays, participation**
    • 20%     Homework assignments; in-class writing**
    • 40%     Two Exams, participation**

*Syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the professor.
**Participation is directly related to attending class, participating in discussion, reading the assigned material, being prepared for class (with appropriate texts and writing materials), and completing assigned work.


Documented Essay Paper Directions

Home computers are being called upon to perform many new functions,
including the consumption of homework formerly eaten by the dog.
Doug Larson

  1. Paper Assignments:  Two five- to-six page papers, plus a Works Cited page.
  2. These papers are documented essays (rather than research papers).  The material will consist primarily of your opinions and insight into the movies and texts used in class with supporting materials, such as book or film reviews, perhaps an article (scholarly or “popular”) about the movie and/or book, etc. Include at least two outside sources. 
  3. The papers may consist of a critical review or an analysis of the text and movie and/or additional versions of the movie, how the movie does or does not conform to the text, why and how the movie was adapted, whether or not the adaptation was successful, a comparison to a remake of the movie or to a version of the movie that was produced earlier, how these movies are or are not successful adaptations of the text; you may come up with your own topics regarding the movie and book, but this must be run by me first.
  4. Papers may be revised and are due one week after the return of the graded paper. The revised copy, together with the original and my comments (I will not accept the revision without the original) are due one week exactly after the paper is handed back. 
  5. Late papers will be accepted on the next class day after the due date and one full grade will be deducted for being late. 
  6. E-mailed papers will be accepted only in a dire emergency.  The key word here is “emergency” not “convenience.”  E-mailed work must be received in my e-mail “box” before it is due in class.  Never write an assignment in the e-mail.  Always attach it.  The assignment should be properly typed in MLA format.  Put your full name in the Subject Box or I will not open it. 
  7. The papers are to be typed in MLA format; no handwritten assignments will be accepted.  Note:  I do not require title or cover pages; do not use plastic sheets, covers, or folders. 
  8. I do not accept papers on discs or CD’s; papers must be printed out. 
  9. Due dates are clearly stated in the Syllabus.  Allow time for personal or family emergencies and malfunctioning equipment.  Familiarize yourself with the computers in the Library and other  computer centers on campus.
  10. No make-ups are offered for exams.
  11. Online help for writing, grammar, usage, etc., can be accessed at the following website sponsored by Purdue University:   http://owl.english.purdue.edu/   This is a fabulous website—browse their offerings and make use of it!

Avoiding Plagiarism

According to the MLA Handbook, 5th edition, “Plagiarism, then, constitutes intellectual theft” (30).   When you use the ideas of another, summarize a paragraph, chapter or other written material, paraphrase (put someone else’s words into your own words), you MUST document the source of that original material. 

When in doubt, DOCUMENT!!!

A student who plagiarizes all or part of an assignment will receive an F for the course.


AGENDA

Jan. 22nd 
Introduction to Film and Literature

Jan. 24th through Feb. 12th
Modern Drama and Horror:
Movie:  House of Sand and Fog; text:  House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Movie:  Psycho; text:  Psycho by Robert Bloch

Feb. 14th through Feb. 9th, 21st & 26th
Film Noir/Suspense:
Movie:  Strangers on a Train; text: Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith
Movie:  The Third Man; text:  The Third Man by Graham Greene

Wed., Feb. 28th, to Sun., March 4th Spring Break

March 5th through 26th 
First Paper due March 19th
War/Satire:
Movie:  M*A*S*H; text:  M*A*S*H:  A Novel About Three Army Doctors  by Richard Hooker
Movie:  Apocalypse Now; text:  The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

March 28th
Mid-term Exam 

Mon., April 2nd, through Mon., April 9th, Religious Holidays

April 11th through April 30th
Plays on Film
Movie:  Biloxi Blues; text:  Biloxi Blues by Neil Simon
Movie:  Bell, Book and Candle; text:  Bell, Book and Candle by John Van Druten

May 2nd through May 14th
Second Paper due May 2nd
Classic Westerns
Movie:  Stagecoach; Short Story:  “Stage to Lordsburg” by Ernest Haycox
Movie:  High Noon; Short Story:  “The Tin Star” by John M. Cunningham

May 16th
Final Exam