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Criminal Justice Resources

Articles and Databases

Search databases to find articles in peer-reviewed journals, magazines, newspapers, reference sources, and other publications. Access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Search Everything
Use the "Search Everything" tab on the Library’s homepage to search across all library collections, including books, ebooks, journals, magazines, newspapers, and other publications.

Academic Search Complete
Articles from peer-reviewed journals, newspapers, and magazines useful for many subjects. A great place to get started with research.

Opposing Viewpoints in Context
Information on controversial issues. Articles from academic journals, magazines, and reference books, audio of news reporting and interviews, videos, statistics, geographic data, and more. Covers a range of topics, including criminal justice.

Points of View Reference Center
Information on controversial issues. Topic overviews, essays, articles from magazines and newspapers, government documents, and transcripts news reporting. Covers a range of topics, including criminal justice.

Social Sciences Full Text
Articles from peer-reviewed journals, magazines, and trade publications in the following subjects: addiction studies, anthropology, community health & medical care, communications, economics, environmental studies, ethics, family studies, gender studies, geography, international relations, law, mass media, minority studies, political science, psychiatry, psychology, public welfare, social work, urban studies and more.

Proquest Research Library
Articles from academic journals, trade publications, and magazines across many subjects, including social sciences, psychology, and law.

LexisNexis
Documents and records from legal, news and business sources.

LexisNexis Federal Statutes, Codes, & Regulations
LexisNexis State Statutes, Codes, & Regulations
Access to laws passed federal and state administrative agencies. Find searching tips here.

PsycArticles
Articles from academic journals in psychology.

PsychINFO
Articles from academic journals, books, and dissertations in the fields of behavioral science and mental health. Content includes psychological aspects of fields such as medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, education, pharmacology, technology, linguistics, anthropology, business, law, and others.

Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
Articles from academic journals in the fields of psychiatry, behavioral medicine, mental health, and counseling.

JSTOR
Articles from academic journals in a range of subjects, including criminal justice, law, sociology, social work, psychology, urban studies, and more.

Films on Demand
Educational films on a wide range of topics, including criminal justice and law. Includes options to view films in short segments and read transcripts.

Newspaper Resources
A guide to newspaper resources available through Farmingdale State College and online.

Journals

This list shows academic journals in the discipline of Criminal Justice. Click on “Full-Text Access” under each title to discover how to access journals via databases and in print.

Books

Textbooks

Search for criminal justice textbooks by course number via this list of textbooks on reserve. Also search by title in the Library’s catalog. Request textbooks at the Circulation Desk. Use these books for up to two hours in the Library. Call numbers are designated by course number, e.g. CRJ 100.

Print Books

Search for books in the Library’s catalog. Also find print materials via the “Books and eBooks” tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc.

Circulating Books: Located on the Lower Level. Check out up to 10 books for 2 weeks at a time with your FSC ID.

Reference Books: Located on the First Floor. Must be used within the Library. Includes encyclopedias, handbooks, dictionaries, test prep books, etc.

eBooks

Search for ebooks via the “Books and eBooks” tab on the Library website. Search by topic, title, author, etc. View materials as a PDF and access from off campus with your FSC username and password.

Websites

Below is a select list of websites featuring authoritative criminal justice-related content.

Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Statistics on crime, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and the operation of justice systems at all levels of government.

Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR)
National crime statistics collected by the FBI. Publications include: Crime in the United States, National Incident-Based Reporting System, Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, and Hate Crime Statistics.

National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
The United States’ primary source of information on criminal victimization. Data is obtained through survey responses from the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD)
Archived data on crime and justice from the University of Michigan.

National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Browse criminal justice topics to locate information via government websites, reports, and articles. Ask a librarian for help locating articles via the Greenley Library.

National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
View publications from the NIJ, the research, development and evaluation agency of the U.S. Department of Justice.

U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)
View DOJ publications.

Citing Sources

Criminal Justice courses typically use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation and format style. See below for basic guidelines and examples of APA citation style. See the “Citation Help” section for more details, examples, and sample APA papers.

 

 

Why you need to cite sources:

  • Citing sources is the only way to use other people’s work without plagiarizing (i.e. if you are using any resource [journal article, book, website, report, interview, etc.], you NEED to give credit to the original source).
  • The readers of your work need citations to learn more about your ideas and where they came from.
  • Citing sources shows the amount of research you’ve done.
  • Citing sources strengthens your work by lending outside support to your ideas.

In-text citations give credit to sources in the body of your paper. Use in-text citations when paraphrasing, directly quoting, or using ideas from sources.

  • APA citation style uses the author-date method for in-text citations: Author(s)’ last name and the year of publication for the source should appear in parentheses in the text.
  • Names may appear either in the sentence itself or in parentheses following the quotation or paraphrase, but the date should always appear in the parentheses, not in the text of your sentence.
  • Include page numbers if you are directly quoting the material.

In-text citation examples:

Examples of criminal justice in-text citations

Citations in the Reference List must correspond to in-text citations; The word or phrase you use in your in-text citations must be the first thing that appears on the left-hand margin of the corresponding entry in the Reference List.

Formatting

  • Separate page labeled “References,” double-spaced, same margins as rest of paper.
  • Indent the second and subsequent lines of citations by 0.5 inches to create a hanging indent.

Author Names

  • Alphabetized by the last name of the first author of each work.
  • Authors' names are inverted (last name, first initial)
  • List all authors of a particular work for up to and including seven authors. If the work has more than seven authors, list the first six authors and then use ellipses (...) after the sixth author's name. After the ellipses, list the last author's name of the work.

Capitalization and Punctuation

  • Capitalize only the first word of a title and subtitle and proper nouns (books, chapters, articles, web pages)
  • Italicize titles of longer works such as books and journals.
  • Do not italicize, underline, or put quotes around the titles of shorter works such as journal articles or essays in edited collections.

Reference List examples:

 Examples of criminal justice references

Access NoodleTools

NoodleTools is a citation manager that can help you generate and format citations correctly.

  • Select the type of resource you are citing (article, book, website, etc.) and NoodleTools will prompt you to enter required information. A citation is then generated in your selected format (APA).
  • NoodleTools requires an account, so every time you log in your citations will be saved for you.
  • When you are finished entering information, a reference list can be generated for you and exported to MS Word or Google Docs.

For more details and examples of APA citation style, visit the following websites:

Also find books on APA citation style when you search the Library’s catalog by subject: Psychology -- Authorship -- Style manuals

Research Help

Have a question? Librarians are available to assist you during all open hours.

Email: reference@farmingdale.edu
Phone: 631-420-2184
Hours

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