Catalog Year 2012 - 2013
Course Descriptions

AET | ANT | ARA | ARC | ART | AVN | BCS | BIO | BUS | CHI | CHM | CON | CRJ | DEN | ECO | EET
EGL | ENV | FRE | FRX | GER | GPH | HIS | HOR | HST | HUM | IND | ITA | LPN | MET | MLG | MLT
MTH | MUS | NSG | NUR | PCM | PED | PHI | PHY | POL | PSY | SET | SMT | SOC | SPA | SPE | STS
TEL | THE | TST | VIS | WST
Automotive Engineering Tech

AET 104 - Combustion Energy Theory
Credits:   2.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to introduce the student to basic heat engine types, their physical configurations and various engine operating cycles. Analytic pressure-volume diagrams are utilized to illustrate the effects of gasoline engine design on performance and combustion requirements. Engine-vehicle performance parameters are analyzed, utilizing individual and group problem solving techniques.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 105 - Fuel Systems - SI Engines
Credits:   2.00 hours
This is a theory/laboratory course developed to give the student a basic understanding of spark ignited internal combustion engine fuel systems. Topics discussed include engine aspiration and combustion using the principles of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics as they apply to the intake, exhaust, volumetric efficiency and fuel metering systems. Engine air/fuel requirements are examined along with state of the art fuel delivery systems (carburetion and fuel injection), with consideration given to fuel economy and exhaust emissions. Performance characteristics of SI Engines utilizing alternate types of fuels are also examined. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 105L

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AET 105L - Fuel Systems - SI Engines (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course developed to give the student a basic understanding of spark ignited internal combustion engine fuel systems. Topics discussed include engine aspiration and combustion using the principles of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics as they apply to the intake, exhaust, volumetric efficiency and fuel metering systems. Engine air/fuel requirements are examined along with state of the art fuel delivery systems (carburetion and fuel injection), with consideration given to fuel economy and exhaust emissions. Performance characteristics of SI Engines utilizing alternate types of fuels are also examined. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included. Corequisite(s): AET 105T (0,2) Credits: 0
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 105T

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AET 105T - Fuel Systems - SI Engines
Credits:   2.00 hours
This is a theory/laboratory course developed to give the student a basic understanding of spark ignited internal combustion engine fuel systems. Topics discussed include engine aspiration and combustion using the principles of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics as they apply to the intake, exhaust, volumetric efficiency and fuel metering systems. Engine air/fuel requirements are examined along with state of the art fuel delivery systems (carburetion and fuel injection), with consideration given to fuel economy and exhaust emissions. Performance characteristics of SI Engines utilizing alternate types of fuels are also examined. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 105L

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AET 106 - Mechanical Equipment-Chassis and Suspension
Credits:   3.00 hours
A theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the design, construction and operation of automotive chassis and suspension systems. Topics will include a study of the vehicle frame, suspension, steering and braking systems. Emphasis is directed to the analysis of the vehicle's systems during operation. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 106L

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AET 106L - Mechanical Equipment-Chassis and Suspension (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the design, construction and operation of automotive chassis and suspension systems. Topics will include a study of the vehicle frame, suspension, steering and braking systems. Emphasis is directed to the analysis of the vehicle's systems during operation. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included. Corequisite(s): AET 106T (0,3) Credits: 0
Lecture:   0.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 106T

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AET 106T - Mechanical Equipment-Chassis and Suspension
Credits:   4.00 hours
A theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the design, construction and operation of automotive chassis and suspension systems. Topics will include a study of the vehicle frame, suspension, steering and braking systems. Emphasis is directed to the analysis of the vehicle's systems during operation. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included. Corequisite: AET 106L
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 106L

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AET 107 - Mechanical Equipment-Engine and Drive Train
Credits:   3.00 hours
A theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the vehicle's engine and drive train. Topics will include the design, construction, inspection techniques, and service and associated repair operations of the internal combustion engine and its component parts. Drive train topics will include clutches, manual transmissions, differentials and other components used in both front and rear wheel drive systems. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 107L
Pre-requisites:   AET 104   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 107L - Mechanical Equipment-Engine Drive Train (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the vehicle's engine and drive train. Topics will include the design, construction, inspection techniques, service and associated repair operations of the internal combustion engine and its component parts. Drive train topics will include clutches, manual transmissions, differentials and other components used in both front and rear wheel drive systems. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 107T

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AET 107T - Mechanical Equipment-Engine and Drive Train
Credits:   3.00 hours
A theory/laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of the vehicle's engine and drive train. Topics will include the design, construction, inspection techniques, service and associated repair operations of the internal combustion engine and its component parts. Drive train topics will include clutches, manual transmissions, differentials and other components used in both front and rear wheel drive systems. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 107L
Pre-requisites:   AET 104   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 109 - Automotive Electrical Principles
Credits:   1.00 hour
This is an automotive theory course designed to introduce students to basic automotive-oriented electrical principles as they relate to both A.C. and D.C. circuits utilized in contemporary automotive electrical systems. Related demonstrations and problem-solving activities are included.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 150 - Automotive Computer Applications
Credits:   2.00 hours
This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic computer utilization and programming. Topics include a thorough introduction to personal computers, instruction in and development of basic programming. Students will be required to develop basic programs for technical automotive problem solving and practical automotive applications. Extensive use of computer laboratory will be required.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Automotive Technology
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Co-Requisites:   AET 150L

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AET 150L - Automotive Computer Applications (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic computer utilization and programming. Topics include a thorough introduction to personal computers, instruction in and development of basic programming. Students will be required to develop basic programs for technical automotive problem solving and practical automotive applications. Extensive use of computer laboratory will be required.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 150T

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AET 150T - Automotive Computer Applications
Credits:   2.00 hours
This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic computer utilization and programming. Topics include a thorough introduction to personal computers, instruction in and development of basic programming. Students will be required to develop basic programs for technical automotive problem solving and practical automotive applications. Extensive use of computer laboratory will be required.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 150L

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AET 208 - Automotive Electrical Applications
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to introduce the student to automotive electrical and electronic systems and their application. The student is required to utilize and understand the operation of various types of electronic equipment, including both computerized engine and emissions analyzers. Related laboratory activities and demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 208L
Pre-requisites:   AET 109   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 208L - Automotive Electrical Applications (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course desgined to introduce the student to automotive electrical and electronic systems and their application. The student is required to utilize and understand the operation of various types of electronic equipment, including both computerized engine and emissions analyzers. Related laboratory activities & demonstrations are included.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 208T

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AET 208T - Automotive Electrical Applications
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course desgined to introduce the student to automotive electrical and electronic systems and their application. The student is required to utilize and understand the operation of various types of electronic equipment, including both computerized engine and emissions analyzers. Related laboratory activities & demonstrations are included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 208L
Pre-requisites:   AET 109   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 209 - Engineering Materials and Manufacturing Processes
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to introduce the student to basic engineering materials and manufacturing processes. Topics include classifications, structure, properties, phase transformation and heat treatment of metals, inspection and testing techniques of automotive engineering materials. Additional topics covered are casting, cold and hot metal forming, machining and joining processes. Related laboratory activities include projects and experiments with technical reports. (2,2) Credits: 3
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 209L

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AET 209L - Engineering Materials and Manufacturing Processes (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course designed to introduce the student to basic engineering materials and manufacturing processes. Topics include classifications, structure, properties, phase transformation and heat treatment of metals, inspection and testing techniques of automotive engineering materials. Additional topics covered are casting, cold and hot metal forming, machining and joining processes. Related laboratory activities include projects and experiments with technical reports.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 209T

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AET 209T - Engineering Materials and Manufacturing Processes
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to introduce the student to basic engineering materials and manufacturing processes. Topics include classifications, structure, properties, phase transformation and heat treatment of metals, inspection and testing techniques of automotive engineering materials. Additional topics covered are casting, cold and hot metal forming, machining and joining processes. Related laboratory activities include projects and experiments with technical reports.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 209L

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AET 215 - Diesel Engines
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of basic diesel engines. Topics will include the study of current high-pressure diesel fuel-injection systems and the diesel engine combustion process with respect to fuel injection and combustion changer design. Specific examination of design and performance characteristics of diesel engine air induction, scavenging, supercharging and turbo-charging systems will be covered. Students will also analyze engine governing methods and devices necessary for control, as well as current methods and devices utilized in solving common diesel engine starting problems. Co-generation systems, including diesel, gas turbine, and steam will be examined.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Pre-requisites:   AET 104   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 215L - Diesel Engines (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course designed to provide a thorough understanding of basic diesel engines. Topics will include the study of current high-pressure diesel fuel-injection systems and the diesel engine combustion process with respect to fuel injection and combustion chamber design. Specific examination of design and performance characteristics of diesel engine air induction, scavenging supercharging and turbo-charging systems will be covered. Students will also analyze engine governing methods and devices necessary for control, as well as current methods and devices utilized in solving common diesel engine starting problems. Co-generation systems, including diesel, gas turbine, and steam will be examined. Related laboratory activities and experiments are included.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 215T

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AET 215T - Diesel Engines
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of basic diesel engines. Topics will include the study of current high-pressure diesel fuel-injection systems and the diesel engine combustion process with respect to fuel injection and combustion changer design. Specific examination of design and performance characteristics of diesel engine air induction, scavenging, supercharging and turbo-charging systems will be covered. Students will also analyze engine governing methods and devices necessary for control, as well as current methods and devices utilized in solving common diesel engine starting problems. Co-generation systems, including diesel, gas turbine, and steam will be examined.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 215L
Pre-requisites:   AET 104   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 216 - Engineering Measurements
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to provide an understanding of engineering measurements theory, methods and devices utilized in today's technology. Topics will include examination of industrial methods of testing, analysis and reporting in the areas of pressure, temperature, speed (time and velocity), fluid flow and exhaust emissions and the testing of common fuels and lubricants. Also included is the evaluation of a series of gasoline engine performance tests and their resulting data, including computer programmed computation and graphical analysis of the completed testing, as presented in a student developed technical paper. Typical engineering measurement instruments and devices will be encountered and utilized in laboratory support of the course.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 216L
Pre-requisites:   AET 150   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 216L - Engineering Measurements (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course designed to provide an understanding of engineering measurements theory, methods and devices utilized in today's technology. Topics will include examination of industrial methods of testing, analysis and reporting in the areas of pressure, temperature, speed (time and velocity), fluid flow and exhaust emissions and the testing of common fuels and lubricants. Also included is the evaluation of a series of gasoline engine performance tests and their resulting data, including computer programmed computation and graphical analysis of the completed testing, as presented in a student developed technical paper. Typical engineering measurement instruments and devices will be encountered and utilized in laboratory support of the course.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 216T
Pre-requisites:   AET 150   Minimum Grade: D   or   AET 150T   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 216T - Engineering Measurements
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course designed to provide an understanding of engineering measurements theory, methods and devices utilized in today's technology. Topics will include examination of industrial methods of testing, analysis and reporting in the areas of pressure, temperature, speed (time and velocity), fluid flow and exhaust emissions and the testing of common fuels and lubricants. Also included is the evaluation of a series of gasoline engine performance tests and their resulting data, including computer programmed computation and graphical analysis of the completed testing, as presented in a student developed technical paper. Typical engineering measurement instruments and devices will be encountered and utilized in laboratory support of the course.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 216L
Pre-requisites:   AET 150   Minimum Grade: D   or   AET 150T   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 217 - Applied Mechanics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory/laboratory course designed to introduce the fundamental principles of applied engineering mechanics. Topics include forces, couples, equilibrium, friction, kinematics of rectilinear and rotational motion, work, energy and power. Principles and applications of hydraulics are also discussed. Related problem-solving activities are included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Pre-requisites:   PHY 135   Minimum Grade: D   or   PHY 135T   Minimum Grade: D   and   MTH 130   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 255 - Automotive Electronics and Computerized Controls
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course developed to provide the student with a working understanding of automotive electronics and computerized engine control systems. The course includes computerized fuel and emission control systems, with emphasis on the diagnosis of basic engine malfunctions. The student will also analyze the principles and operation of feedback type systems. Electronic diagnostic equipment is used to identify system malfunctions in order to indicate necessary corrective actions. Laboratory activities provide an opportunity for a practical application of diagnostic procedures on current vehicles.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 255L
Pre-requisites:   AET 208   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 255L - Automotive Electronics and Computerized Controls (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course developed to provide the student with a working understanding of automotive electronics and computerized engine control systems. The course includes computerized fuel and emission control systems, with emphasis on the diagnosis of basic engine malfunctions. The student will also analyze the principles and operation of feedback type systems. Electronic diagnostic equipment is used to identify system malfunctions in order to indicate necessary corrective actions. Laboratory activities provide an opportunity for a practical application of diagnostic procedures on current vehicles.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 255T

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AET 255T - Automotive Electronics and Computerized Controls
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course developed to provide the student with a working understanding of automotive electronics and computerized engine control systems. The course includes computerized fuel and emission control systems, with emphasis on the diagnosis of basic engine malfunctions. The student will also analyze the principles and operation of feedback type systems. Electronic diagnostic equipment is used to identify system malfunctions in order to indicate necessary corrective actions. Laboratory activities provide an opportunity for a practical application of diagnostic procedures on current vehicles.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 255L
Pre-requisites:   AET 208   Minimum Grade: D   or   AET 208T   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 257 - Automatic Transmissions
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course dealing with the transmission of power in automobiles, emphasizing contemporary automatic transmissions. Topics covered include applications of the principles of the planetary gear systems, fluids, seals, hydrodynamic drives, hydraulic controls and application devices. The power flow within selected automatic transmissions is discussed and is supported with related laboratory activities.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Industrial Tech/Automotive Mgt
Automotive Technology
Automotive Engineering Tech.
Co-Requisites:   AET 257L
Pre-requisites:   AET 107   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 257L - Automatic Transmissions (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a laboratory course dealing with the transmission of power in automobiles, emphasizing contemporary automatic transmissions. Topics covered include applications of the principles of the planetary gear systems, fluids, seals, hydrodynamic drives, hydraulic controls and application devices. The powerflow within selected automatic transmissions is discussed and is supported with related laboratory activities.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 257T

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AET 257T - Automatic Transmissions
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a theory course dealing with the transmission of power in automobiles, emphasizing contemporary automatic transmissions. Topics covered include applications of the principles of the planetary gear systems, fluids, seals, hydrodynamic drives, hydraulic controls and application devices. The powerflow within selected automatic transmissions is discussed and is supported with related laboratory activities.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Co-Requisites:   AET 257L
Pre-requisites:   AET 107   Minimum Grade: D   or   AET 107T   Minimum Grade: D

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AET 290 - Project Seminar
Credits:   1.00 hour
This course is designed to provide the student with the challenge of an independent project. Requirements will include the completion of an extensive faculty approved research/construction project. This project must be related to the automotive field. The student is responsible for the original project concept, which must be supported by preliminary, progress and final technical reports. A video-taped oral presentation is also required.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 290W - Project Seminar (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   1.00 hour
This course is designed to provide the student with the challenge of an independent project. Requirements will include the completion of an extensive faculty approved research/construction project. This project must be related to the automotive field. The student is responsible for the original project concept, which must be supported by preliminary, progress and final technical reports. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AET 490 - Selected Topics in Automotive Management Technology
Credits:   1.00 to 3.00 hours
Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 to 9.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 491 - Special Topics: Internship
Credits:   1.00 to 3.00 hours
Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior status and/or permission of the Chair/ Faculty.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 to 9.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 492 - Special Topics: Electric Vehicle
Credits:   1.00 to 3.00 hours
Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior Status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 to 9.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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AET 493 - Special Topics: Hybrid Electrical Vehicle
Credits:   1.00 to 3.00 hours
Selected topics of current interest in Automotive Engineering Technology. Prerequisite: Senior Status and/or permission of the Chair/Faculty.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 to 9.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Automotive Engineering Tech

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Anthropology

ANT 100 - Introduction to Anthropology
Credits:   3.00 hours
Anthropology is the scientific study of human-kind. This course offers an introduction to its four major sub-fields, namely; Physical or Biological anthropology (human evolution, the fossil record, ethology); Archaeology (extinct cultures, classical civilizations, pre-history); Linguistics (language origins, development, diffusion, structure, and change); Sociocultural Anthropology (pioneers in the field, cross-cultural research, case studies, and the future). By focusing on the broad cultural implications and complexities of social communication and interaction, anthropology seeks to understand the whole human experience.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 110 - Sociocultural Anthropology
Credits:   3.00 hours
Sociocultural Anthropology is concerned with examination of the social and cultural similarities and differences in the world's human populations. Subsistence patterns, social organization, economic structures, political systems, religion and creative behavior are the major areas we cover. By examining examples ranging from small gathering and hunting groups to large modern day communities, this course provides a broad perspective of the sociocultural realities of our world.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 120 - Archaeology
Credits:   3.00 hours
Archaeology is the study of the cultural evolution of humankind using the material remains of past human behavior. This course introduces the methods, logic and history of archaeology through an examination of several ancient civilizations as understood through their architecture and artifacts. Topics include theoretical issues, fieldwork, and interpretation of artifacts and reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples will be drawn from such cities and civilizations as Mesopotamia, Crete, Troy, Ancient Egypt, Pompeii, and North and South America. Students will visit at least one relevant site, exhibit or museum as a course requirement.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 130 - North American Indians
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a comprehensive history of the human groups who populated North America before, during and after this continent became involved with the culture, politics and economics of Europe. It focuses on the dynamic heritages, languages, knowledge, technology, arts, and values that have been passed on through the generations. Students will be introduced to the anthropological literature concerned with the study and understanding of Native American cultures and societies. Some field study may be required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 210 - Modern Anthropology and Globalization
Credits:   3.00 hours
Cultural change and the social processes involved are major areas of cultural anthropological research. By introducing students to the application of anthropological methodologies such as field work and cross-cultural comparison, the course examines some of the major issues which confront human beings in a complex rapidly growing and changing world including: globalization, migration and immigration, population changes, social conflict, agricultural/technological development, nutrition, commodity/cultural exchange, and the future of small scale homogeneous societies. Prerequisites: any 100 level social science or business course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 211 - Caribbean Cultures
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers: pre-European cultures in the Caribbean, the post-Columbus plantation system, contemporary economics and politics, community structure, religion, marriage and family, ethnic diversity, immigration and the arts. An in-depth study of these topics will provide knowledge, understanding and appreciation of this region while offering insights into the development of communities in the U.S. with Caribbean heritage.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 220 - Topics in Anthropology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course encourages students and faculty to study, explore, examine and analyze areas of special, short-term interest in anthropology. Each topic builds on knowledge learned in the 100 level courses.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology
Pre-requisites:   ANT 100   Minimum Grade: D   and   ANT 110   Minimum Grade: D   or   SOC 122   Minimum Grade: D

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ANT 240 - Women, Men and Social Change
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course studies men's and women's changing roles, relationships, and participation in the labor force both cross-culturally and historically. We give special emphasis to those changes which occur as technology changes. A major part of the course concerns how and why today's women and men arrive at their social, economic, political and legal statuses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for SOC 240 or WST 240.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology

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ANT 250 - Forensic Anthropology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a broad overview of Forensic Anthropology- an applied field within Anthropology- dealing with the osteological (skeletal anatomy and biology) analysis of human remains. We will employ and discuss scientific methods used to explore and a broad range of problems associated with identification and trauma analysis using data gathering methods such as: characteristics of the human skeleton; identification of ancestry, age, sex; recovery methods; use of appropriate technologies for analysis, including DNA. Prerequisites required or any 100- level Anthropology or Sociology or Biology course with lab.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Sociology/Anthropology
Pre-requisites:   SOC 122   Minimum Grade: D   or   ANT 100   Minimum Grade: D   or   ANT 110   Minimum Grade: D   or   ANT 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   ANT 120   Minimum Grade: D

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Arabic

ARA 131 - Arabic I (Elementary)
Credits:   3.00 hours
A beginning course in Arabic emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages

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ARA 132 - Arabic II (Elementary)
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of ARA 131 or for students who have had 2 to 3 years of high school Arabic. This course emphasizes the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages
Pre-requisites:   ARA 131   Minimum Grade: D

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ARA 233 - Arabic III (Intermediate)
Credits:   3.00 hours
For those students who have taken ARA 132 or four or more years of high school Arabic. This intermediate course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. A literary and cultural reading will be introduced.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages
Pre-requisites:   ARA 132   Minimum Grade: D

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ARA 234 - Arabic IV (Intermediate)
Credits:   3.00 hours
For those student who had taken ARA 233 or four or more years of high school Arabic. This course emphasizes structural review, intensified practice in oral expression with increased emphasis on reading and writing skills. Continued attention will be given to contemporary Arabic culture. Selections from Arabic authors will be read.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages
Pre-requisites:   ARA 233   Minimum Grade: D

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Architectural Technology

ARC 251 - Architectural Design I
Credits:   3.00 hours
Studies the principles of form, space and order that underlie architectural design. Concepts include: mass void modeling, volume and space construction, enclosing planes, circulation, organization, hierarchy, and structure. The diagram and sketch model are introduced as methods of understanding design. Concepts are explored in both three dimensional and graphic form.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 111   Minimum Grade: D   and   CON 121   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 253 - Architectural Design II
Credits:   3.00 hours
Continuation of Architectural Design I. Emphasis is placed on the process by which design decisions are made and the methods of analysis in context to the existing environment. Topics include: structure, form and function, building in context, light and construction.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 251   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 263 - Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Energy Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
An overview of mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) aspects of buildings. Intended to develop students' ability to analyze energy requirements of buildings and various methods of energy conservation and thermal efficiency. Topics covered include heat flow, system and equipment for heating and cooling. Also included are water supply and wastewater treatments for buildings.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 272 - Construction Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
Construction Design is a technology-based design studio emphasizing a methodological approach to the assembly of the building's envelope, materials and systems. The integration of building code requirements, life safety, accessibility, building energy systems, structure, construction, and materials are central to effectively achieving design intent. Knowledge from Materials and Method of Construction I and II, Energy in Buildings and Graphics are applied to specific drawing assignments. A residential Type V construction, and a commercial Type II or Type III construction, building project will be advanced resulting in a set of construction documents.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 121   Minimum Grade: D   or   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D   and   CON 261   Minimum Grade: D   or   ARC 263   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 350 - Architectural Theory and Design Factors
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will examine a series of architectural theories and design factors that attempts to explain, predict or influence design decisions that result in the built environment. Topics include: historical theory; form and aesthetics; architectural technology; the urban, natural and human environment; economic, zoning and code factors; the social and behavioral implications of architecture, the design process itself and the architectural profession.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 253   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( ARC 362   Minimum Grade: D   or   CON 362   Minimum Grade: D )  

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ARC 350W - Architectural Theory and Design Factors (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will examine a series of architectural theories and design factors that attempts to explain, predict or influence design decisions that result in the built environment. Topics include: historical theory, form and aesthetics; architectural technology; the urban, natural and human environment; economic, zoning and code factors; the social and behavioral implications of architecture, the design process itself and the architectural profession. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C   and   ARC 253   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( ARC 362   Minimum Grade: D   or   CON 362   Minimum Grade: D )  

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ARC 362 - History Western Architecture
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of the development of building design from the Ancient Egyptians and Greeks throughout the major historical periods to the present. Emphasis is on the evolution of the forms derived from indigenous technologies of periods surveyed. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for CON 362.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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ARC 364 - Site Design and Construction
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an advanced course in the utilization of engineering and architectural principles from concept through the construction techniques of traditional and sustainable site development. Site planning techniques, municipal land development requirements, zoning regulations, soil stabilization techniques, erosion control parameters, stormwater management practices, and site construction details are applied to a site design project. Computer-aided programs in site design and survey data management will be introduced.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 103   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 366 - Architectural Design III
Credits:   3.00 hours
Continuation of Architectural Design II. Emphasis is placed on the urban and natural environment. The role of aesthetics, symbols, and the use of historical elements in the making of places, spaces and communicating meaning are explored. Topics include: building on Main Street, the making of an urban space and a cemetery or park design.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 253   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 399 - Applied Research Topics
Credits:   3.00 hours
Continuation of Architectural Design II. Emphasis is placed on the urban and natural environment. The role of aesthetics, symbols, and the use of historical elements in the making of places, spaces and communicating meaning are explored. Topics include: building on Main Street, the making of urban space and a cemetery or park design. Prerequisites: Junior/Senior status, department approval.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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ARC 466 - Architectural Design IV
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is the culmination of the Architectural Design sequence. A single project will be given that integrates principles of architectural design and includes elements of building systems, structural and site design, zoning and building codes, etc. on an actual site in the area. Students will present their final project to the faculty at the end of the semester.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 366   Minimum Grade: D

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ARC 496 - Design Capstone Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
This capstone course integrates several architectural and engineering design philosophies and methodologies into a comprehensive studio project. This course introduces very little new material; rather it is to synthesize knowledge learned in the following areas of design and analysis: architectural, structure, construction, site, energy (mechanical/electrical) and building systems and cost estimating. This multidisciplinary project uses a student design team approach. Prerequisite(s): Department Chair approval.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 466   Minimum Grade: D   and   ARC 363   Minimum Grade: D   and   CON 404   Minimum Grade: D

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Art Studies

ART 123 - Art History
Credits:   3.00 hours
An analysis of the social, physical and psychological influences affecting the artist during various historical periods through the present. Emphasis is on the interrelationship between the changing purposes of art and variations in the meaning and form of artistic expression.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   English/Humanities

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ART 200 - History of Graphic Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
Graphic design has great power and has both reflected and influenced our society and culture throughout history. This course identifies the key movements within the history of graphic design from the Graphic Renaissance throughout today and highlights how these movements have mirrored and changed the course of our society and the field of graphic design. Lectures, images and texts will be used in of each of the following periods: Graphic Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution, Mid-Century Modernism, Late-Modernism Post-Modernism and the Digital Age.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Visual Communications
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 201 - Survey of Art History: Prehistoric Times through The Middle Ages
Credits:   3.00 hours
A survey of the history of the visual arts from their beginnings in prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Visual Communications
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 202 - Survey of Art History: Early Renaissance to the Present
Credits:   3.00 hours
A survey of the history of the visual arts from the Early Renaissance to the Present. Works of art are studied both as monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies in which they were created.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   English/Humanities
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 242 - Italian Renaissance Art
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to Ancient through Baroque art found in Italy. Students will be required to meet on campus prior to departing for Europe to study the great masterpieces of the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods of art found in their original contexts throughout Italy. Works of Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Illuminated Manuscripts and other applied arts will be studied as they relate to the periods in which they were created.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Visual Communications
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 244 - Visual Studies and Studio in Northern
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to Medieval through 19th century European art found in the countries of France, Belgium and Holland. The class will meet four times on campus prior to departing for Europe to study the great masterpieces of the Gothic Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo Classical, Romantic, Realistic and Impressionist and Post-Impressionist periods of art found in their original contexts throughout Europe. The Great institutions to be visited may include: the Louvre, the Rijks Museum and Hague to name a few. Prerequisite(s) required or Permission of Instructor.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Visual Communications
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D   and   VIS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   VIS 110   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 245 - Visual Art Studies and Studio in Greece
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will introduce the Ancient through Byzantine periods of art as they occurred in Greece. Students will study the art and the history surrounding the art's creation during three lectures on the campus of Farmingdale State. This will occur before departing to Europe to visit the country of Greece to study the original art first hand over the period of two weeks. In Europe, students will explore the Aegean, Classical, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine art styles by studying works of architecture, sculpture, painting, illuminated manuscripts, archaeological and other applied arts in the context of churches, archaeological sites and art museums. Mythology and Homeric literature will be introduced in order to gain an insight into the cultural foundations of Western Art and Civilization. Students will be assigned a term paper based on specific works studied, and will also be expected to maintain a journal including notes, drawings and other entries related to their experience abroad.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Visual Communications
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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ART 301 - Arts in the Twentieth Century
Credits:   3.00 hours
An analysis of the development of music, art, film, theater, dance, architecture, and design through the nine decades of the twentieth century. Field trips to various cultural events and extensive use of audio-visual materials are included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   English/Humanities
Pre-requisites:   EGL 102   Minimum Grade: C

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ART 302 - Art History: Survey of American Art
Credits:   3.00 hours
A survey of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from the early colonial period to the present. Lectures, supplemented by slides and textbook illustrations, will provide the basis for an analysis of the "schools" styles, and influences that determined and are affecting the direction of American Art.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Visual Communications

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Aviation Administration

AVN 100 - General Aeronautics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides introductory orientation and practical information essential to the career progression of both pilots and aviation administrators. Topics include: attributes of an aviation professional; aircraft design, components, performance, operation, maintenance and safety with human factors emphasis. Required for flight training.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 101 - Aviation Industry: A History Perspective
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is a basic survey of the aviation industry viewed from a historical perspective. Topics covered will range from the early days of flight to the present. At the conclusion of this course the student will have a comprehensive knowledge of the air transportation/aviation industry and will understand its significant social/economic impact upon the United States and the world.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 102 - Meteorology
Credits:   3.00 hours
A basic course in Aviation Weather. Weather theory including differential heating, air mass development, wind frontal activity and systems, weather hazards, weather reporting and weather forecasting is covered. Charts which are studied include Surface Analysis and Weather Depiction Charts, Constant Pressure Charts, Composite Moisture Stability Charts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 104 - Private Pilot Ground
Credits:   3.00 hours
Private Pilot Ground Training will enable the student to meet the pre-requisites specified in CFR 14 Part 61.105. Selected subject areas will include airplane systems, aero-dynamic principles, flight environment, communication and flight information, meteorology for pilots, FAR's, NTSB, AC's, interpretation of weather data, aircraft performance, navigation, human factors, and cross country flight planning. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to take FAA "Knowledge Examination" necessary for the professional pilot certificate.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 105

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AVN 105 - Private Pilot Flight to Solo
Credits:   1.00 hour
Private Pilot Flight to Solo will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to perform solo flight with the aircraft in the traffic pattern. Selected subject areas will include starting, normal and cross wind taxiing, radio communications, normal takeoffs, power on and power off stalls, maneuvering during slow flight, traffic patterns, go around from a rejected landing and normal landings.
Other:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 104

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AVN 106 - Private Pilot Flight To Certificate
Credits:   2.00 hours
Private Pilot Flight to certificate will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain a Private Pilot Certificate. Selected subject areas will include cross country flying, radio navigation, cockpit management, low level wind shear precautions, airport and runway marking and lighting, constant airspeed climbs and descents stall spin awareness and steep turns. Aero fees will be charged. Note: Flight course must be completed within a year from the date a student registers. Within this time frame a student must either 1) Successfully complete the course and may be issued a grade, OR 2) Withdraw from the course, due to the following extenuating circumstances: Active Military Obligations, Medical conditions requiring removal from active flight status for a duration of 60 consecutive days or more. If neither of the above occurs, a failing grade will be assigned.
Other:   4.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 105   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 104   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 110 - Introduction to Flight
Credits:   2.00 hours
Introduction to Flight offers students with no prior flight time an opportunity to begin training in normal preflight, in-flight and post-flight procedures as provided by the SUNY Flight Line. The student is afforded 5 hours combined flight and simulator time and may then commence flight training for Private Pilot. Aero fees will be charged. Note: Flight courses must be completed within a year from the date a student registers. Within this time frame a student must either 1) Successfully complete the course and be issued a grade, OR 2) Withdraw from the course, due to the following extenuating circumstances: Active Military Obligations, Medical conditions requiring removal from active flight status for a duration of 60 consecutive days or more. If neither of the above occurs, a failing grade will be assigned.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 112 - Private Pilot Proficiency
Credits:   2.00 hours
Private Pilot Proficiency will evaluate the entering student with a Private Pilot or higher Certificate and, if necessary, enable them to gain required experience, skill and knowledge for meeting or surpassing FAA FAR141 Private Pilot Certificate Practical Test Standards. AERO fees will be charged.
Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Aeronautical Sci:Prof. Pilot
Pre-requisites:   AVN 111B   Minimum Grade: D   or   AVN 106   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 126 - Aviation Security Management I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will introduce students to techniques and procedures necessary to maintain security in the aviation industry. Topics will include screening passengers and cargo, access control, Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) monitoring, Explosive Trace Detection (ETD) systems, X-ray systems, wanding, and other new developmental technologies. In this course, students will become familiar with the above security methods by using hands on techniques. Students will learn how to operate and maintain Explosive Trace Detection machines and X-Rays, properly screen passengers and monitor CCTV systems to prevent breaches in security.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 191 - Air Cargo Cooperative Experience
Credits:   3.00 hours
This Cooperative Experiences or Internships is an elective for first year Aviation Administration students. This course will provide employer/student designed internship experience. The student will acquire work skills and cooperative attitudes that will complement and enhance the academic competencies learned during the prior semester.
Lab:   10.00 to 12.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 201 - Safety Ethics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course emphasizes ethical decision making as it applies to Complex Systems, aviation and aerospace, nuclear power plant, civil and IT engineering and the medical field. These systems have an extremely narrow tolerance for error, often resulting in monumental impact on the public, the economy of the nation and human life. This course seeks to increase the awareness levels of ethical issue for industry professionals and to provide the necessary skills to effectively deal with such critical problem solving issues. Topics include complex systems ethical decision making, safety with human factors emphasis, applied ethics for members of complex systems, corporate culture and risk management theory, moral and values.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 202 - Aviation Meteorology
Credits:   3.00 hours
A basic course in Aviation Weather. Weather theory including differential heating, air mass development, wind frontal activity and systems, weather hazards, weather reporting and weather forecasting is covered. Charts which are studied include Surface Analysis and Weather Depiction Charts, Constant Pressure Charts, Composite Moisture Stability Charts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 104   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 208 - Instrument Pilot Ground
Credits:   3.00 hours
Instrument Pilot-Ground Training will enable the student to meet the prerequisites specified in CFR 14 Part 61.65(b). Selected subject areas will include Federal Aviation Regulations that apply to flight operations under IFR, appropriate information that applies to flight operations under IFR in the "Aeronautical Information Manual", Air Traffic control system and procedures for instrument flight operations, IFR navigation and approaches by use of navigation systems. Use of IFR enroute and instrument approach procedure charts, Procurement and use of aviation weather reports and the elements of forecasting weather trends based on that information and personal observation of weather conditions. Safe and efficient operation of aircraft under instrument flight rules and conditions, Recognition of critical weather situations and wind shear avoidance, Aeronautical decision making and judgment and crew resource management, including crew communication and coordination. Upon completing this course, the student will be able to take the FAA "Knowledge Examination" necessary for the Instrument Pilot Certificate. Prerequisite: FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Test (passed); Private Pilot Certificate; or approval from this department chair
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Aeronautical Sci:Prof. Pilot
Aviation Administration
Pre-requisites:   AVN 104   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 209 - Instrument Pilot Flight
Credits:   2.00 hours
Instrument Pilot Flight will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain an Instrument Rating. Selected subject areas will include airplane attitude control by instrument use only, use of full and partial panel reference, accurate use of navigation systems by maintaining positional awareness, holding patterns, instrument approaches, and IFR cross country procedures. Note: Flight course must be completed within a year from the date a student registers. Within this time frame a student must either 1) Successfully complete the course and may be issued a grade, OR 2) Withdraw from the course, due to the following extenuating circumstances: Active Military Obligations, Medical conditions requiring removal from active flight status for a duration of 60 consecutive days or more. If neither of the above occurs, a failing grade will be assigned.
Other:   4.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 211 - Commercial Pilot Ground
Credits:   3.00 hours
Commercial Pilot Ground Training will enable the student to meet the prerequisites specified in CFR 14 Part 61.125(b). Selected subject areas will include, Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board, basic aerodynamics and principles of flight, meteorology to include recognition of critical weather situations, wind shear recognition and avoidance, and the use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts, safe and efficient operation of aircraft weight and balance computations, use of performance charts, significance and effects of exceeding aircraft performance limitations, use of aeronautical charts and a magnetic compass for pilotage and dead reckoning, use of air navigation facilities, aeronautical decision making and judgment, principles and functions of aircraft systems, maneuvers, procedures, and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft, night high altitude operations, procedures for operating within the National Airspace System, and procedures for flight and ground training for lighter than air ratings. At the conclusion of this course, the student will take the FAA "Knowledge Examination" necessary for the Commercial Pilot certificate.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 208   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 212 - Commercial Pilot Flight
Credits:   2.00 hours
Commercial Pilot Flight will enable the student to meet the requirements necessary to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. Selected subject areas include accurate planning of VFR cross country flights, pilotage, dead reckoning, navigation systems, and commercial maneuvers as well as provide the skill necessary to safely fly a complex airplane. Note: Flight course must be completed within a year from the date a student registers. Within this time frame a student must either 1) Successfully complete the course and may be issued a grade, OR 2) Withdraw from the course, due to the following extenuating circumstances: Active Military Obligations, Medical conditions requiring removal from active flight status for a duration of 60 consecutive days or more. If neither of the above occurs, a failing grade will be assigned.
Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 218 - Power Plants (Recips/Jet)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the theory and principles of operation of aircraft reciprocating engines and their subsystems such as carburetor, ignition, lubrication and propeller. Theory of operation of jet engines to include: classification and identification of turbojets, turbofans, turboprops, ramjets and rockets and their internal parts and subsystems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 220 - Instrument Flight and Air Traffic Control Procedures
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is the introduction to flying under the Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) in the National Airspace System. The student will learn air traffic control system, airports, departure, en route and approach procedures, emergency flight procedures, and low and high level weather conditions in IFR flight planning.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 100   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 102   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 111   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 230 - Airline Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will give the students an integrated study of airline operations and functions. Domestic and international regulation of air carries and the industry's changing structure due to alliances and globalization are addressed. Topics include the annual profit plan, uniform system of accounts and reports, demand analysis, scheduling, the theory of pricing, fleet planning, facilities planning, airline financing, airline economics, airline marketing and pricing, computer reservation and revenue management systems, fleet planning and scheduling, aircraft maintenance aircraft finance, labor relations, organizational structure, and strategic planning.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 270 - Introduction to Airports Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introductory course, which provides foundational information and strategic concepts about the air transport/ airport system. Topics include: Overview of Air Transport/ Airport system, Department of Transportation/Federal Aviation Administration, Intro to Airports/Management, Organizational Development, Management Roles and Theories, Motivational and Communications Principles/Processes.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 271 - Airport Capacity/Delay/Airspace Environment
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the following topics: Airport Capacity and Delay, Technological and Weather Solutions, Air Traffic Control, U.S. Airspace, Air Navigation and Navigational Aids Runway Lighting Systems, FAA FAR Part 77, Environmental Regulations and Airport Noise, Land Use Compatibility.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 280 - Introduction to Air Cargo Operations
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course introduces the student to the growing, technical and multi-faceted air cargo industry. The student will understand the role that air cargo has played in the development of the air carrier industry, contractual and legally binding regulations, and national and international trade. A visit to off-campus air cargo facilities will compliment classroom discussions, lectures and videos.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   CRJ 100   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 281 - Air Cargo Government and Industry Regulations
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course exposes the student to the study and process of regulations of the Air Cargo Industry. It includes a study of and compliance with government and air carrier regulations; with practical applications of the specialized manuals and penalties of non-compliance. It includes the influence that organizations such as ICACO and IATA have on the Air Cargo industry.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 100   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 291 - Air Cargo Cooperative Experience II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This Cooperative Experiences or Internships is an elective for second year Aviation Administration students. The course will provide employer/student designed internship experience. The student will acquire work skills and cooperative attitudes that will complement and enhance the academic competencies learned during the prior year.
Lab:   10.00 to 12.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 300 - Government in Aviation
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course expands and focuses on many of the regulatory subjects in AVN 101 (Aviation History). It is a study of the constitutional, legislative, executive and judicial control of aviation from the local, state, federal and international perspective. This course forms the foundation for AVN 400 Aviation Law. Prerequisite(s) required and Junior or Senior standing.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Security Systems
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   CRJ 100   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 300W - Government in Aviation (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course expands and focuses on many of the regulatory subjects in AVN101 (Aviation History). It is a study of the constitutional, legislative, executive and judicial control of aviation from the local, state, federal and international perspective. This course forms the foundation for AVN400 Aviation law. This is a writing-intensive course. Junior or Senior standing required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Aeronautical Sci:Prof. Pilot
Security Systems
Aviation Administration
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   CRJ 100   Minimum Grade: C   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 310 - Flight Instructor-Flight
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course prepares the Commercial Pilot to acquire the Initial Flight Instructor Certificate for Airplane. Training will consist of at least 30 hours flight and 40 hours ground training. Emphasis will be placed on successfully passing the FAA Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI) and Flight Instructor-Airplane Knowledge tests for Lesson plan development for flight instruction along with actual teaching of Private and Commercial maneuvers, performed from the right seat, will occur in both a single engine and complex single engine aircraft. The student will pass the practical test and obtain the initial Flight Instructor Certificate with the Airplane single engine rating to complete the course. Prerequisites: Student must Possess at least a Commerical Pilot Certificate-with Airplane and Instrument ratings.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 094
Pre-requisites:   AVN 210   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 320 - Air Carrier Flight Operations
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of the operational considerations and procedures of air carrier flight operations. Flight Operations conducted under 14CFR121 (Part121 air carriers) are highlighted. Also included are 14CFR135 (Part135) Air Carriers, supplemental air carriers and Operators of Large Aircraft flight operations.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 220   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 321 - Physiology of Flight
Credits:   3.00 hours
Operational and lifestyle considerations and consequences arising from physiological factors will be introduced, with an emphasis on the atmosphere and high-altitude flight (Hyperbarism). General fundamentals of anatomy and psychology will be reviewed to impart career-prolonging health maintenance and stress reduction techniques. Subtle yet critical aviation issues such as situational awareness and crew resource management will be explored.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 100   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 322 - Advanced Aircraft Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course exposes the student to the advanced aircraft systems commonly found in air carrier aircraft. Included are Electrical Systems, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Flight Controls, Landing Gear Systems, Auto-Pilots and Cockpit Automation, Master Warning and Caution Annunciation Systems. At the conclusion of this course, the student should have a good level of operational understanding of these systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 210   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 323 - Air Carrier Flight Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course exposes the student to the area of flight planning for the major carrier's operations. The main area of study will include the following subjects: High Altitude Aviation Meteorology, Transport Category Aircraft weight and balance, Take-off, En-route and Landing Performance and Emergency Procedures. Advanced Flight Planning, Jet Route Structure. Jeppesen IFR High Altitude En-route Charts. NOS and Jeppesen IFR Approach Plates and Published Minimums; U.S. Air Traffic Control Systems/Airspace; Airline Positive Operational Control Concepts; Federal Aviation Regulations Part 121/1199/135; Airline Communications Systems- Secal/ARINC/ACARS/Satcom Captain/Dispatcher Joint Authority/Decision Making.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 322   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 330 - Airline Marketing
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course examines the principles of marketing used by the major U.S. airlines and how they are applied for long term financial success in the industry. There will be an initial review of the structure of the air transport market and the industry marketing environment. This will be followed by a detailed study examining the airline business and marketing strategies, product design, pricing, revenue management, distribution channels, and selling and advertising policies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 370 - Airport Financial Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the following topics: Financial Management Managerial Accounting, Airport Fees, Rates, Charges, Airport Capital Development/Funding, Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Funding, Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Funding.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   BUS 201
Pre-requisites:   AVN 270   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 371 - Airport Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the following topics: Airport System Planning, National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS), Metropolitan Airport System Planning, State Airport System Planning, Airport Master Planning, Airport Layout Plans, Airport Design, Design of Other Landing Facilities, Industrial Park Design, Terminal Planning/ Design/ Operation, Other Terminal Area Buildings, Americans with Disability Act Access.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 270   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 380 - Air Cargo Sales Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
The students will be introduced to the topic through a variety of pedagogical methods that will include lectures, hands-on use of the most prominent manuals, regulations related to the industry, group discussions and videos.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 280   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 381 - Air Cargo Management Techniques
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will provide students with an overview of the air cargo management in relation to leadership, safety, cost effectiveness, and problem solving. This course will cover various managerial topics that pertain to air cargo operations, with a particular focus on identifying staffing needs, providing acceptable customer service, determining practical goals for maintaining service levels over an extended period of time. This course will also review IATA rules and regulations, and provide students with practical in-class exercises which will focus on developing operational flight schedules for an air cargo operator while maintaining the objective of remaining compliant with various human resources and labor regulations.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   0.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 280   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 400 - Aviation Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
Aviation Law develops the student's knowledge to the application level of learning by emphasis on real cases to demonstrate the legal, regulatory and government theory previously discussed in AVN 101and AVN 300. Emphasis will be on the FAA's roles in regulating aviation including the rule making process, certification of airmen, medical certification and enforcement.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 300   Minimum Grade: C   or   AVN 300W   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 401 - Aviation Economics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the economic history of the air carrier industry from 1911 to the present. The details of airline deregulation prior to 1978 are discussed as is the transition from regulation to deregulation- 1978 to present and Marketing and financial practices as they exist today under deregulation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   ECO 156   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 270   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 404 - Corporate and Business Aviation
Credits:   3.00 hours
Study of the flight operations, administration, maintenance and financial functions of a corporate flight department. The FBO and small airplane business will be discussed including applications in aerial photography and spraying, aircraft sales and financing.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   AVN 300W   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 410 - Commercial Pilot Multi-Engine Pilot Rating
Credits:   1.00 hour
This course prepares the Commercial Pilot with single-engine and instrument ratings to add a multi-engine airplane to his /her certificate. 15 hours flight and 15 hours ground instruction run concurrently. The passing of the FAA practical exam and attainment of the Multi-Engine rating will successfully complete the course.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 210   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 411 - Flight Instructor Instrument Pilot
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course prepares the student with a CFI to acquire the Flight Instructor- Instrument rating. Training will consist of at least 20 hours flight and 15 hours ground instruction. Passing the FAA Flight Instructor- Instrument- Airplane Knowledge test and the FAA flight test will complete the course. Prerequisite required or FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane Certificate.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 310   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 412 - Certified Flight Instructor - Multi-Engine
Credits:   1.00 hour
This course prepares the student with a CFI to acquire the Flight Instructor- Multi-Engine rating. Training will consist of at least 25 hours flight and 20 hours ground instruction. Passing the FAA Flight Instructor- Multi- Engine Knowledge test and the FAA flight test will complete the course. Prerequisite required or FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane Certificate.
Lecture:   1.40 hours Lab:   1.70 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 310   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 417 - Homeland Security in Aviation
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will expose the student to the importance of Homeland Security in the aviation industry and the important role each employee in the industry is charged with. Students will gain experience in identifying false travel documents and identifying suspicious air travelers. This course will focus on current national security threats in the aviation industry. Upon the successful completion of this course the students will meet the requirements of the initial and recurrent security training requirements mandated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) under Title 49 CFR 1552.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Security Systems
Pre-requisites:   AVN 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   AVN 300W   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 419 - Airline Transport Pilot (ATP)
Credits:   3.00 hours
Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) will allow pilots who already hold the Commercial Pilot Certificate with either Single or Multiengine Land Airplane, and Instrument Rating Airplane, and who meet the prerequisite 1,500 hours along with other requirements, to acquire the Airline Transport Pilot Certificate. This certificate is required in order to act as a pilot in command for most airlines. Flight training will include preparation for completing all practical test tasks. Students must pass the FAA ATP Airplane knowledge exam, and must meet all requirements specified in FAR 61 subpart G prior to the practical exam. At the conclusion of the course the student will successfully pass the practical exam for course completion and credit. Prerequisites: Commercial Certificate Airplane single/multi land instrument, 3rd class medical.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 421 - Gas Turbine Engines
Credits:   3.00 hours
An in-depth study of gas turbine engines as found in air carrier and high performance aircraft. Topics include the history of turbine development, jet propulsion, theory engine design and construction and control systems. Prerequisite required or FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 321   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 422 - Aerodynamics and Aircraft Performance
Credits:   3.00 hours
Advanced aerodynamic principles will be introduced following extensive review of fundamentals. Emphasis will be on practical design and performance considerations including mission, cost, and feasibility. This course will familiarize the student with the application of aeronautical principles and design practices. The course will focus steps in preliminary design of general aviation aircraft with emphasis on the iterative aspects of design.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 211   Minimum Grade: C   and   PHY 136   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 423 - Crew Resource Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course deals with flight-crew decision making. It includes, but is not limited to: optimum decision-making techniques; personality profiling; crew communication; high risk areas of a flight; maintaining situational and spatial awareness; crew discipline; and airline-level standard operating procedures. Prerequisite(s): Junior Advances Standing and Completion of an AVN 300W level course, FAA Commercial Certificate with Instrument Rating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 424 - Advanced Avionics and Cockpit Automation
Credits:   3.00 hours
Introduction to modern cockpit avionics suites as found in corporate Jets and Transport Category aircraft. Principles , operation and limitations of advanced avionics suites typically found in this category aircraft. Automation topics covered include automatic flight control and flight director systems, stability augmentation systems, power management systems, flight management systems and autoland/go around systems. Latest technology navigation systems topics including inertial navigation systems(INS), inertia reference systems(IRS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS) including Local Area Augmentation Systems(LAAS) and twice Area Augmentation Systems(WAAS). Prerequisite(s) required or FAA Commercial Certificate with Instrument Rating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 322   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 425 - Safety of Flight
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course undertakes a cross-curricular review of factors influencing aviation safety, such as airport and aircraft design, crew training, and air traffic and navigation facilities. Relevant government regulations will be introduced although the primary emphasis will be on case studies and statistical analysis. Guest speakers and field trips may supplement lecture materials. Prerequisite(s) required or FAA Commercial Certificate with Instrument Rating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 210   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 432 - Aviation Insurance
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the basic foundations of Aviation Insurance and Risk Management. Topics to be covered include hull and liability coverage, subrogation and the insurer's interests after covering a loss, underwriting and claims management. This course helps students to explain the various types of insurance coverage found in aviation such as, hangar keepers, employers, pilots, airlines and airport operators.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 400   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 440 - Commuter Turboprop Training
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course exposes the student to an actual air carrier transport aircraft initial training ground school. The course will examine all of the specific aircraft and engine systems for this airplane and will be conducted so as to simulate the intensity of an airline training course. All major systems and subsystems of the aircraft as well as its limitation and normal and emergency operating procedures will be covered in detail. At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to pass an airline style written and oral exam on the aircraft.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 424
Pre-requisites:   AVN 322   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 421   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 441 - Seminar in Air Carrier Operations
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides students the opportunity to acquire experience through research on, observation of, and internships within the aviation industry. Information will be exchanged via reports, presentations, and seminar discussion.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 442 - Large Airshow Operations and Seminars
Credits:   3.00 hours
A field study course allowing the student under faculty guidance to put together a rich aviation experience by attending the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Airventure in Oshkosh, WI or the EAA Sun-and-Fun Fly in Lakeland, FLA. Prior to attending the shows, the class will meet to discuss the range of activities available during the exhibition. The students must attend a specified number of industry seminars, demonstrations, static displays and museum presentations. A paper is required.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 100   Minimum Grade: D   and   AVN 101   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 443 - Specialty Flying
Credits:   3.00 hours
Specialty flying is a vital area in General Aviation although it does not attract the attention that airline and military flying do. This course will deal with Agricultural Aviation; Bush Flying using float, large wheel and ski equipped aircraft.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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AVN 470 - Airport Operations
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the following topics: Airport Operations and FAA FAR Part 139, FAR Part 139, Airport Self Inspection, Pavement Surfaces, Movement and Safety Areas, Airfield Lighting and Pavement Marking, Snow and Ice Control, Snow Removal Equipment, Airport Condition Reporting, Ground Vehicles, Public Protection, Wildlife Hazard Management, Airport Emergency Plan and Response, Airport Air Carrier Security.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 471
Pre-requisites:   AVN 270   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 471 - Aviation Administration Seminar
Credits:   3.00 hours
This capstone course will provide the body of knowledge that will prepare students for the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE) Certified Membership (C.M.) Accreditation Examination. Successful completion of this course and the AAAE C.M. accreditation process will enable students to have a competitive edge in applying for entry-level airport operations coordinator and/or management jobs.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Co-Requisites:   AVN 470
Pre-requisites:   AVN 370   Minimum Grade: C   and   AVN 371   Minimum Grade: C

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AVN 480 - Air Cargo Operations-Advanced
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course will expand upon the introductory concepts learned in AVN 280. Students will be exposed to various in-class exercises that will address the importance of identifying the variables involved in the flow of typical air cargo operations. Students will gain expertise in "troubleshooting" and solving problematic situations such as flight delay due to mechanical and/or weather; late delivery of high priced cargo products; emergency response to live animal and/or perishable equipment; damage to aircraft and/or cargo ULDs or other equipment; and employee injury. The real world applications of Quality Work Programs (QWP) and current advances in air cargo automation and/or computer controlled processes will be explored. Communication skills in air cargo operations management will also be stressed.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation
Pre-requisites:   AVN 280   Minimum Grade: D

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AVN 490 - Aviation Internship
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to earn elective credit for acquiring hands-on industry experience. Prior work site approval by the Aviation Department is required before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite(s):Completion of 30 credits with an overall GPA of 2.5.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Aviation

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Business and Computer Systems

BCS 101 - Programming Concepts and Problem Solving
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will provide an introduction to programming logic and problem solving techniques using different programming languages. The topics covered in this course will provide the skills needed to learn languages such as Visual Basic, C+ + and JAVA. Topics include such items as constants and variables, data types, scope of variables, basic logic constructs, subroutines and functions. Students who have completed BCS 120, BCS 185 or equivalent cannot take BCS 101.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 102 - Computer Concepts and Applications
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an introductory course in the use of personal computers in today's society. Students will receive instruction in basic computer concepts and terminology, the fundamentals of the Windows operating system and have hands on experience at the beginning to intermediate level using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The Internet will be used to supplement textbook and lecture materials. Computer Systems students cannot use BCS102 to meet a BCS Elective requirement.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 120 - Foundations of Computer Programming I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces the C++ Programming Language as a means of developing structured programs. Students will be taught to develop algorithms using top-down stepwise refinement. Students will be introduced to the concept of Object Oriented programming through the use of pre- defined classes. In addition, students will get a thorough exposure to C++ syntax and debugging techniques. BCS 101 cannot be taken concurrently with BCS 120.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   EET 110   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 130 - Website Development I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an introductory course in Web page authoring in which students will create Web pages using HTML (HyperText Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). In addition to the introductory topics of changing text appearance, creating hyperlinks, and inserting images into a Web page, advanced topics such as layout, tables, and form will also be covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 136 - Programming in COBOL I
Credits:   3.00 hours
The fundamental skills and knowledge of computer programming using COBOL are developed in this course. Among the topics studied are elements of the COBOL programming language and application of the language to solving business computer applications.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 148 - 8086 and 8088 Assembler Programming I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course examines the architecture and instruction set of the INTEL 8086 and 8088 chips used on the IBM-PC. Topics include: machine execution; addressing; input/output; arithmetic; branching, and control instructions. Students use the IBM-PC macro assembler to code and debug typical business applications.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 185 - Programming in Visual Basic
Credits:   3.00 hours
The Visual Basic language is used to develop Windows applications in a fast, reliable and efficient manner. This course will present the main components of a Visual Basic program, and will use these components to develop increasingly more complex Windows applications. The standard Windows forms and controls will be explored in providing the skills and knowledge necessary to write these event driven graphical interfaces. BCS 101 cannot be taken concurrently with BCS 185.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 202 - Computer Applications for Business/Sport Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
In this course students will learn the fundamentals of computer applications for business including sport management. This course will cover file management and have hands on experience at the beginning through advanced level using microcomputer spreadsheet and database applications. Students will use a spreadsheet program to enter formulas, create charts, execute functions and macros, create, sort and query lists, create pivot tables, create templates, and work with multiple worksheets and workbooks. Students will use a database program to create data table structures, queries, reports, and forms, create switchboards, pivot tables, and pivot charts. Please note: This course may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the B.S. in Computer Programming and Information degree. Students completing this course may not receive credit for SMT 202. Prerequisite(s): BCS 102 with a C or better
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 204 - Comparative Programming Languages
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of programming languages with an emphasis on general concepts and constructs such as repetition, decisions and modularization. Procedural vs. object-oriented program design paradigms and examples of each will be a major portion of the course. Examples comparing how different kinds of languages approach the same problem will also be included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 191   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 100   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 205 - Hardware and Software Selection
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a hardware and software overview of the microcomputer industry. The designs of various commercially available computers and their input/output devices will be explored in detail. Criteria for equipment selection decision making will be provided. Among the topics to be covered are microcomputer systems, monitors, printers, plotters, modems, A/D and D/A converters and operating systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 208 - Networking Fundamentals I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers a basic introduction to networking terminology and concepts. It begins with an overview of Industry standards and the OSI reference model. It then moves on to cover different network topologies and IP addressing. The students are then introduced to the concept of subnetworks using subnet masks. Basic networking design, different networking components, and safety issues are covered extensively. OSI model layers and network layers with routing and best path selection theory are also presented. Dynamic routing operations, as well as Link State versus Distance Vector Protocols are covered in detail. The practical part of the course is implementing and testing basic LAN infrastructure configurations. This course may also be applied towards CISCO certification. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing. Corequisite(s): BCS 208L (2,2) Credits: 3
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 208L

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BCS 208L - Networking Fundamentals I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course covers a basic introduction to networking terminology and concepts. It begins with an overview of Industry standars and the OSI reference model. It then moves on to cover different network topologies and IP addressing. The students are then introduced to the concept of subnetworks using subnet masks. Basic networking design, different networking components, and safety issues are covered extensively. OSI model layers and network layers with routing and best path selection theory are also presented. Dynamic routing operations, as well as Link State versus Distance Vector Protocols are covered in detail. The practical part of the course is implementing and testing basic LAN infrastructure configurations. This course may also be applied towards CISCO certification. Corequisite: BCS 208 Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 208T

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BCS 208T - Networking Fundamentals I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers a basic introduction to networking terminology and concepts. It begins with an overview of Industry standards and the OSI reference model. It then moves on to cover different network topologies and IP addressing. The students are then introduced to the concept of subnetworks using subnet masks. Basic networking design, different networking components, and safety issues are covered extensively. OSI model layers and network layers with routing and best path selection theory are also presented. Dynamic routing operations, as well as Link State versus Distance Vector Protocols are covered in detail. The practical part of the course is implementing and testing basic LAN infrastructure configurations. This course may also be applied towards CISCO certification. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 208L

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BCS 209 - Networking Fundamentals II
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course picks up from where BCS 208 leaves off, then moves on to configuring routers, using different models and routing protocols and commands, as well as exploring the features of the hardware and software components of the routers. Theories of routing protocols and their algorithms, including RIP and IGRP are explored in depth. The practical part of the course involves a full series of hands-on exercises and Labs using CISCO routers and switches to demonstrate the proper configuration. ACL settings, wiring and verification/testing of operational networks as required. Network Management issues are also addressed. This course may be applied towards CISCO certification.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 209L
Pre-requisites:   BCS 208   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 209L - Networking Fundamentals II Laboratory
Credits:   0.00 hours
The course picks up from where BCS 208 leaves off, then moves on to configuring routers, using different models and routing protocols and commands, as well as exploring the features of the hardware and software components of the routers. Theories of routing protocols and their algorithms, including RIP and IGRP are explored in depth. The practical part of the course involves a full series of hands-on exercises and Labs using CISCO routers and switches to demonstrate the proper configuration. ACL settings, wiring and verification/testing of operational networks as required. Network Management issues are also addressed. This course may be applied towards CISCO certification. Corequisite: BCS 209 Prerequisite: BCS 208 with a Grade of C or better.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 209T
Pre-requisites:   BCS 208   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 208T   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 209T - Networking Fundamentals II
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course picks up from where BCS 208 leaves off, then moves on to configuring routers, using different models and routing protocols and commands, as well as exploring the features of the hardware and software components of the routers. Theories of routing protocols and their algorithms, including RIP and IGRP are explored in depth. The practical part of the course involves a full series of hands-on exercises and Labs using CISCO routers and switches to demonstrate the proper configuration. ACL settings, wiring and verification/testing of operational networks as required. Network Management issues are also addressed. This course may be applied towards CISCO certification.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 209L
Pre-requisites:   BCS 208   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 208T   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 215 - UNIX Operating Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course develops the fundamental knowledge of computer operating systems using UNIX. Topics include basic understanding of the UNIX system, utilizing the file system, programming language and security system.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 230 - Foundations of Computer Programming II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course expands the knowledge and skills of Foundations of Computer Programming I. Among the topics covered are: arrays, pointers, strings, classes, data abstraction, inheritance, composition and overloading. Prequisite(s): BCS 120 or DPR 120 with a grade of C or better (3,0) Credits: 3
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C   or   DPR 120   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 232 - Electronic Commerce
Credits:   3.00 hours
This cross-listed business management and business computer systems course covers electronic commerce (EC) foundations, retailing methodologies, and marketing research. Focus will be on the various forms, strategies, and implementations of EC including business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C), and consumer-to-consumer (C2C). Also covered will be social networking, electronic payment systems, and public policy issues including privacy and intellectual property matters as well as recent information technology advancements. Students may receive credit for either BUS 232 or BCS 232 but not for both.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   and   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 237 - Intermediate COBOL Programming
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course expands the skills and knowledge of computer programming using COBOL. Topics to be covered include multi-level control break processing, file handling techniques for both sequential and indexed files, table processing, and searching and sorting methods.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 136   Minimum Grade: C   or   DPR 136   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 240 - Website Development II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a course for future Web developers on creating successful Web sites. Topics covered will include planning, analysis, designing and developing well-organized Web sites that combine effective navigation with the use of graphics, text and color.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 130   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 240W - Website Development II (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a course for future developers and designers on creating successful Web sites. Topics covered will include planning, analysis, designing, and developing well-organized Web sites that combine effective navigation with the use of graphics, text, and color. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 250 - JavaScript
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces students to JavaScript and frameworks such as jQuery. Students will learn about variables, objects events to create dynamic Web pages. Students will learn techniques such as conditional statements, loops, arrays, event handlers, traversing the Document Object Model, and client-side forms validation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 255 - Operating Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course develops the fundamental knowledge of computer operating systems. Topics included in this study are types of operating systems, facilities and features of the different systems and user techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 260 - Data Base
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides the fundamental knowledge of database concepts. Topics studied will include the history and advantages of database systems, and the process of database design including entity-relationship diagrams and database normalization. Students will have hands-on experience using SQL (Structured Query Language).
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 262 - Data Communications
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of computer networking and its role in the business world today. Topics include: history of networking and applications, voice and data communications, hardware, transmission, network topologies, network analysis, the OSI model, design, implementation and management issues.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 285 - Advanced Programming Visual Basic
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides an in-depth study of the skills and knowledge of Visual Basic programming. It is intended to reinforce and build upon the introductory Visual Basic by extending coverage of the programming language and introducing more advanced features of the language. Some of the advanced topics covered will include multitier applications, database programming, programming for the web and web forms, using report mechanisms, object- oriented terminology, creating classes and instantiating objects.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C   or   DPR 185   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 295L - Networking Fundamentals (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course covers a basic introduction to networking terminology and concepts. It begins with an overview of Industry standards and the OSI reference model. It then moves on to cover different network topologies and IP addressing. The students are then introduced to the concept of subnetworks using subnet masks. Basic networking design, different networking components and safety issues are covered extensively. OSI model layers, and network layers with routing and best path selection theory are also presented. Dynamic routing operations, as well as Link State verses Distance Vector Protocols are covered in detail. The course then moves on to configuring routers, different modes and commands, as well as features of the hardware and software components of the routers. The practical part of the course concentrates on preparing various networking cables using applied cabling techniques as well proper configuration, wiring and vertification/testing of simple networks is required. This course may also be applied toward CISCO certification. Corequisite: BCS 295.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Co-Requisites:   BCS 295
Pre-requisites:   BCS 262   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 300 - Management Information Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
Managers have increasing responsibility for determining their information system needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support these needs. Management information systems integrate, for purposes of information requirements, the accounting, finance, and operations management functions of an organization. This course will examine the various levels and types of software and information systems required by an organization to integrate these functions.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 111   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 301 - Systems Analysis and Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course explores the major issues in the analysis and design of a system, including methods of data collection, information requirements analysis, and the analysis process are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the user in the design process and focuses on approaches that improve the successful implementation of a computer system. Topics include general systems theory, Systems Development Life Cycle, data flow diagrams, data dictionary, hardware and software evaluation, feasibility analysis, CASE tools and prototyping. Students are required to demonstrate their skill in using project management and diagramming application software. Note: Credit cannot be given for both BCS 265 and BCS 301.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 302 - Systems Analysis and Design II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an advanced course in Systems Analysis and Design. Students will utilize the tools covered in BCS 301 to analyze system designs. Topics covered in the design phase will include input, output, and database and user interface design. A CASE Tool and/or other rapid application development tools will be used to create the interfaces. Additional topics in the implementation and maintenance phases will include testing, implementation and maintenance. Object-oriented systems and UML will also be covered. Students will analyze and prepare various case projects and will present and document their results.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 301   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 303 - XML
Credits:   3.00 hours
Students will be introduced to the basic intermediate concepts of XML, the Extensible Markup Language. Students will learn how to create the XML document, work with name- spaces, Document Type Definitions, and XML schemas. In addition, students will also use the advanced features of XML, such as XPath and the XSLT stylesheet language to transform XML documents.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 120   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 185   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 311 - Local Area Networks and Server Administration
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will provide an introduction to local area networking concepts. These ideas will be explored in conjunction with an introduction to the concepts and tools necessary to implement, administer and troubleshoot the Microsoft Windows 2000 network. Hands-on experience will be used in the presentation of system administration tools.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 262   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 315 - UNIX Operating Systems II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course further develops the knowledge of computer operating systems using UNIX. It will augment the knowledge gained in BCS 215. Topics to be covered include an in-depth examination of the design of the UNIX system, using advanced text processing utilities, advanced Shell programming and an introduction to the setup and administration of UNIX networks.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 215   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 316 - PERL Programming
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides an introduction to programming in the Perl language. Students will learn the Pearl syntax, the basics of using regular expressions, how to use Perl data types, and how to access and manipulate files. Students are also introduced to database connectivity and debugging techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 215   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 317 - Enterprise Resource Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is an organizational and information systems approach that integrates planning, customer relationship management, decision making, master scheduling, material requirements planning, marketing, forecasting, sales, finance, electronic commerce, and human resources. The course will include lectures and extensive use of supporting ERP software. Note: Students who have previously completed IND 313 cannot receive credit for BUS/ BCS 313. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BUS 317.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 320 - LAN Switching and Wireless
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in Enterprise Networks. The course uses the Cisco Enterprise Composite model (ECM) to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet ECM requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues. This course may also be applied towards CISCO training certification as defined by the CISCO Academy. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 320.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 208   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 208T   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 321 - Accessing the WAN
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in Enterprise Networks. The course uses the Cisco Enterprise Composite model (ECM) to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet ECM requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues. This course may also be applied towards CISCO training certification as defined by the CISCO Academy. Note: Students who have completed BCS 330 or BCS 335 may not receive credit for BCS 321. (3,0) Credits: 3
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 209   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 209T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 320   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 345 - JAVA Programming
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed for students with some experience with programming. The syntax of the Java programming language, object-oriented programming, creating graphical user interfaces (GUI), exceptions, file input/output (I/O), and how to create Java applications and applets will be covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 346 - Object Oriented Programming Using C++
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the Fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming using the Turbo C++ compiler. The course will cover the syntax of the C++ language by building upon traditional C programs as well as the methodology to design and implement an Object Oriented Program.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 196   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 350 - Web Database Development
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced course prepares the student to use database management systems with web server software to develop and maintain the information content of a web site. Students in the course should have prior knowledge of programming and database management systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 360 - Programming in SQL
Credits:   3.00 hours
The second in a two course sequence applies the knowledge of BCS 260 to administer and implement a relational database system. Topics covered may include: embedded SQL; PL/SQL; advanced/optimized SQL queries; transaction management including concurrency and recovery; schema refinement; higher-level normal forms; integrity; security; and database administration development.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 370 - Data Structures
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will present sequential and linked representations of various built-in and abstract data structures including arrays, records, stacks, queues and trees. Algorithms will be developed relating to various sorting and searching techniques, merging and recursion. A high-level structured programming language, such as C, using both static and dynamic storage concepts, will be used in exploring and developing these algorithms.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 378 -
Credits:   3.00 hours
Topics include cryptology principles, security, accuracy and privacy in computer systems with an analysis of hardware and software measures and counter-measures. A study of the National Bureau of Standards- DES (Data Encryption Standard) and other hardware and software techniques are included. Two semesters of a programming language required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 262   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 380 - Oracle and PL/SQL Programming
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will provide a detailed examination of a relational database management system and its procedural language such as Oracle and PL/SQL or SQL Server and T-SQL. General programming concepts such as conditional and iterative control, error handling and built-in exceptions will be discussed. Covered in more detail will be topics such as cursors, triggers, and the stored functions, procedures and packages. These topics will then be explored through laboratory assignments using a RDBMS such as Oracle or SQL server.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 360   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 390 - Database Administration and Security
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides the knowledge necessary to handle database administration and database security. Topics studied will include installation and configuration of a database, managing and securing user resources and privileges, data integrity, and optimization.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 360   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 405 - IS Development Project Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover Project Management tools and techniques for Systems Development projects. Students will learn Project Management, Scope Management, Time Management, Cost Management, Quality Management, Human Resource Management and Communications Management all in the context of running successful information systems development and implementation projects. MS project will be used as a tool to managing all of these areas.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 300   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 410 - Computer Architecture
Credits:   3.00 hours
Computer Architecture is the study of hardware and software components of business information systems. Thorough understanding of the workings of the digital computer system is expected. Topics include: hardware components, the machine cycle, binary arithmetic, systems software, and assembly language. These topics are evaluated with respect to their impact on the development of business information systems. Two semesters of a programming language required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 262   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 413 - Advanced Enterprise Resource Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced-level Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) course includes high-level information technology coverage of Scheduling, Planning, MRP, Logistics, Warehousing, Procurement, Quality, Vendor Management, Cost Accounting, Forecasting, KPI, Supply Chain, and Customer Resource Management. Also covered are concepts and software applications pertaining to product design, development, manufacturing (production), marketing, sales, and field service. This course emphasizes proficiency in the skill sets typically required within industry practices.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 300   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BUS 313   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 313   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BCS 415 - Operating System Internals and Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will involve the study of the fundamentals of operating systems design and implementation. The concepts covered include process management, memory management, file systems, I/O system management, distributed systems, and security. Students will examine how these concepts are found in several current open-source operating systems, including Vista, UNIX and/or Linux.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 215   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 420 - Client/Server Computing
Credits:   3.00 hours
Included in this course are a wide range of issues, methods, techniques and case examples for developing and managing client/server and distributed systems. These include client/ server development using (RAD) methodologies, transaction process monitors, types of aboveware and middleware, middleware standards (DCE,RPC and CORBA), managing client/server environments, software installation and distribution, electronic mail architectures in C/S products.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: D

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BCS 425 - Decision Support Systems and Data Warehousing
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course integrates systems analysis, programming, database and networking for better decision making. Decision Support Systems (DSS) characteristics are covered followed by a survey of the various DSS models. Topics covered will include hardware and software technologies that support a DSS, Expert Systems, Data Warehousing, OLAP and Data Mining. Case studies will be used to illustrate these systems. The course will provide a strong foundation for the use of models within the context of building and using decision support systems, and it will focus on multi- dimensional databases.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 427 - Game Programming
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides an introduction to two-dimensional game programming. Students will learn how to draw and manage game objects. Techniques for adding sound to a game will be discussed. Creation of computer controlled game objects will also be covered. Students will receive hands-on experience with a current game development platform. Students will be expected to create their own two-dimensional game by the end of the course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 345   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 430 - Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
The primary objective of this capstone course is to give Computer Programming and Information Systems students an opportunity to integrate techniques and concepts acquired in their other courses. Elements will be drawn primarily from BCS 301 (Systems Analysis and Design) and BCS 260 (Database) in addition to other courses in the student's selected track of study. The course is experiential in nature, i.e. the student will be required to produce results for use by real individuals and will be evaluated both on process and product.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 301   Minimum Grade: C   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 430W - Senior Project (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
The primary objective of this course is to give Computer Programming and Information Systems students an opportunity to integrate techniques and concepts acquired in their other courses. Elements will be drawn primarily from BCS301 (Systems Analysis and Design) and BCS260 (Database), in addition to other courses in the student's selected track of study. The course is experiential in nature i.e. the student will be required to produce results for use by real individuals and will be evaluated both on process and product. In addition to prerequisites, a second level programming course with a grade of C or better, and Senior level standing is required. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 301   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BCS 230   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 285   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BCS 440 - CPIS Internship
Credits:   3.00 hours
In this course, the student works under the tutelage of a professional who serves as site supervisor in an organization that provides information services. The work done by the student is guided by learning objectives agreed to by the site supervisor, the faculty member and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports, and a final report on their experience to the client and to the department. The course offers an ideal opportunity to test theory in practice and to gain experience in a realistic information provision situation. The experience is expected to be mutually beneficial for the organization and student.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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BCS 450 - Special Topics in Computer Programming and Information Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover topics not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from term to term and reflect the interests of students, faculty and industry. Topics may include wireless communications, rapid application development and other emerging technologies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:    

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BCS 451 - Special Topics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover topics not covered in the regular curriculum. Topics may vary from term to term and reflect the interests of students, faculty and industry. Topics may include wireless communications, rapid application development and other emerging technologies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems
Pre-requisites:   BCS 215   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 262   Minimum Grade: C

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BCS 457L - Bioinformatics Senior Project (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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BCS 457T - Bioinformatics Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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BCS 460 - Independent Study
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an independent study course designed to offer the student experience in research of a specialized area of interest. The student will have an opportunity to work individually or with a group in designing, developing and presenting a research project. The topic must be approved by a faculty member. Students will be required to submit full documentation and present their final results.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Computer Systems

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Biology

BIO 120 - General Biology
Credits:   4.00 hours
A survey of life from the standpoint of humans, including structural and behavioral evolution, functional characteristics, and relationship to the natural world. Recent developments in Biology are explored, including applications of DNA analysis and recombinant DNA technology. The laboratory exercises involve simple investigations of the life processes by utilizing basic research tools. A range of life forms are studied in the laboratory, with particular emphasis on animals ranging from planaria to preserved frogs. Note: BIO 120 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 120L

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BIO 120L - General Biology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A survey of life from the standpoint of humans, including structural and behavioral evolution, functional characteristics, and relationship to the natural world. Recent developments in Biology are explored, including applications of DNA analysis and recombinant DNA technology. The laboratory exercises involve simple investigations of the life processes by utilizing basic research tools. A range of life forms are studied in the laboratory, with particular emphasis on animals ranging from planaria to preserved frogs. BIO 120 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 120T

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BIO 120T - General Biology
Credits:   4.00 hours
A survey of life from the standpoint of humans, including structural and behavioral evolution, functional characteristics, and relationship to the natural world. Recent developments in Biology are explored, including applications of DNA analysis and recombinant DNA technology. The laboratory exercises involve simple investigations of the life processes by utilizing basic research tools. A range of life forms are studied in the laboratory, with particular emphasis on animals ranging from planaria to preserved frogs. BIO 120 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 0r BIO 131.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 120L

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BIO 121 - Health, Heredity, and Behavior
Credits:   3.00 hours
Health, Heredity, and Behavior is a 3 credit, non-lab course. It focuses on the most common and clinically significant diseases and conditions that afflict modern developed societies, first building a foundation of the basic anatomy and physiology necessary to understand the disorder, then exploring the experiences of the people afflicted. The inherited and lifestyle risks associated with disorder are discussed and strategies to reduce those risks are investigated. This course is appropriate for non-science majors.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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BIO 123 - Human Body in Health and Disease
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course is an inquiry into the mechanism of diseases that plague human beings. A systemic approach is taken in which all the major systems of the human body and the significant diseases that affect those systems are studied. Emphasis is on failures of homeostasis as the basic mechanisms of disease. Included are discussions on available treatments and therapies, the impact of new technological developments, and maintaining health and avoiding disease. The laboratory component contains both traditional and computer-generated exercises, which illustrate the onset and development of a variety of diseases and pathological states. Note: BIO 123 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 123L

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BIO 123L - Human Body in Health and Disease (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course is an inquiry into the mechanism of diseases that plague human beings. A systemic approach is taken in which all the major systems of the human body and the significant diseases that affect those systems are studied. Emphasis is on failures of homeostasis as the basic mechanisms of disease. Included are discussions on available treatments and therapies, the impact of new technological developments, and maintaining health and avoiding diesease. The laboratory component contains both traditional and computer-generated exercises, that illustrate the onset and development of a variety of diseases and pathological states. Note: BIO 123 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 123T

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BIO 123T - Human Body in Health and Disease
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course is an inquiry into the mechanism of diseases that plague human beings. A systemic approach is taken in which all the major systems of the human body and the significant diseases that affect those systems are studied. Emphasis is on failures of homeostasis as the basic mechanisms of disease. Included are discussions on available treatments and therapies, the impact of new technological developments, and maintaining health and avoiding diesease. The laboratory component contains both traditional and computer-generated exercises, that illustrate the onset and development of a variety of diseases and pathological states. Note: BIO 123 is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts. However it does not satisfy Bioscience Core requirements and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 130 or BIO 131.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 123L

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BIO 125 - Principles of Nutrition
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a basic background in the nature and biochemical function of essential and non-essential nutrients, the molecular basis of metabolism and nutrient requirements of living cells and organisms. The role of nutrients in gene expression, genetically modified foods and the role of diet in the treatment of chronic and other existing states will be explored through research and lecture.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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BIO 130 - Biological Principles I
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the molecular and cellular level, and develops the foundations of evolutionary and ecological concepts. There is a study of cell structure, and an examination of cellular composition and metabolic processes including enzyme activity, respiration, and photosynthesis. Principles of genetics are studied at the cellular and molecular level, with reference to current techniques in molecular biology. Evolutionary mechanisms are introduced and ecological concepts are presented as a unifying theme. Note: BIO 130 is the first course in the required two-semester introductory sequence in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 130L

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BIO 130L - Biological Principles I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the molecular and cellular level, and develops the foundations of evolutionary and ecological concepts. There is a study of cell structure, and an examination of cellular composition and metabolic processes including enzyme activity, respiration, and photosynthesis. Principles of genetics are studied at the cellular and molecular level, with reference to current techniques in molecular biology. Evolutionary mechanisms are introduced and ecological concepts are presented as a unifying theme. Note: BIO 130 is the first course in the required two-semester introductory sequence in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 130T

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BIO 130T - Biological Principles I
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the molecular and cellular level, and develops the foundations of evolutionary and ecological concepts. There is a study of cell structure, and an examination of cellular composition and metabolic processes including enzyme activity, respiration, and photosynthesis. Principles of genetics are studied at the cellular and molecular level, with reference to current techniques in molecular biology. Evolutionary mechanisms are introduced and ecological concepts are presented as a unifying theme. Note: BIO 130 is the first course in the required two-semester introductory sequence in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 130L

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BIO 131 - Biological Principles II
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the organismal level, and examines the diversity of living things. The origins and adaptations of the Prokaryota, Protista, and Fungi are explored, with emphasis on their ecological roles, economic value, and medical significance. Plant life cycles are introduced, and plant structure, physiology, and utilization are studied. The evolution and adaptations of various animal phyla are presented, with a consideration of structure and function in each; organ systems are studied with emphasis on humans as representative vertebrates. Note: BIO 131 is the second course in the required two-semester introductory in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 131L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 131L - Biological Principles II (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the organismal level, and examines the diversity of living things. The origins and adaptations of the Prokaryota, Protista, and Fungi are explored, with emphasis on their ecological roles, economic value, and medical significance. Plant life cycles are introduced, and plant structure, physiology, and utilization are studied. The evolution and adaptations of various animal phyla are presented, with a consideration of structure and function in each; organ systems are studied with emphasis on humans as representative vertebrates. Note: BIO 131 is the second course in the required two-semester introductory in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 131T

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BIO 131T - Biological Principles II
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course deals with biological processes primarily at the organismal level, and examines the diversity of living things. The origins and adaptations of the Prokaryota, Protista, and Fungi are explored, with emphasis on their ecological roles, economic value, and medical significance. Plant life cycles are introduced, and plant structure, physiology, and utilization are studied. The evolution and adaptations of various animal phyla are presented, with a consideration of structure and function in each; organ systems are studied with emphasis on humans as representative vertebrates. Note: BIO 131 is the second course in the required two-semester introductory in the Bioscience Curriculum Core. It is also approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as a lower-level laboratory science elective within the Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 131L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 135 - Introduction to Oceanography
Credits:   4.00 hours
Marine Science is designed to give the student an appreciation and understanding of the dynamics and interactions of the various components (biological, chemical, physical, geological) of the world's oceans. Habitats studied will range from near shore estuarine systems to deep ocean systems. Special consideration will be given to the human use and manipulation of the Long Island coastal zone. Laboratory sessions will include methodologies used in oceanographic sampling and analysis as well as exercises reinforcing lecture material. Field trips will also play an important part of the course work supporting lecture topics.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 135L

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BIO 135L - Introduction to Oceanography (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 135

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BIO 166 - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is a one semester integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology, covering the major physiological and morphological relationships of the human organ systems. The design of this course is appropriate preparation for Dental Hygiene, Medical Laboratory Technology, and certain other allied health professions, but it does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum. The major theme of the course is the integrative pathways and regulatory processes that maintain the homeostasis of the body. Note: BIO 166 does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 170 or BIO 171 It is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as lower-level laboratory science elective within Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Dental Hygiene
Medical Laboratory Technology
Health Studies
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 166L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 120   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Biology   065  

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BIO 166L - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is a one semester integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology, covering the major physiological and morphological relationships of the human organ systems. The design of this course is appropriate preparation for Dental Hygiene, Medical Laboratory Technology, and certain other allied health professions, but it does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum. The major theme of the course is the integrative pathways and regulatory processess that maintain the homeostasis of the body. Note: BIO 166 does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 170 or BIO 171 It is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as lower-level laboratory science elective within Liberal Arts.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Dental Hygiene
Medical Laboratory Technology
Health Studies
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 166T

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BIO 166T - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is a one semester integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology, covering the major physiological and morphological relationships of the human organ systems. The design of this course is appropriate preparation for Dental Hygiene, Medical Laboratory Technology, and certain other allied health professions, but it does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum. The major theme of the course is the integrative pathways and regulatory processess that maintain the homeostasis of the body. Note: BIO 166 does not satisfy the requirements of the Nursing Curriculum and cannot be used as a substitute for either BIO 170 or BIO 171 It is approved in the Natural Sciences General Education Competency Area and can serve as lower-level laboratory science elective within Liberal Arts.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 166L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 120   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Biology   065     or   BIO 120T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 170 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy and Physiology I are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 170L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 120   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Biology   065  

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BIO 170L - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy & PhysiologyI are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 170T

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BIO 170T - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics included in Anatomy & PhysiologyI are: basic anatomical and directional terminology, fundamental concepts and principles of cell biology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 170L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 120   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Biology   065     or   BIO 120T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 123T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 171 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the inter- relationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy and Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 171L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 170C   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 171L - Human Anatomy and Physiology II (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the inter- relationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy & Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 171T

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BIO 171T - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Credits:   4.00 hours
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the inter- relationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. This sequence is appropriate preparation for nursing and other allied health professions. Topics include Anatomy & Physiology II are: the endocrine system, the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system and immunity, the respiratory system, the digestive system, metabolism, the urinary system, fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance; and the reproductive systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 171L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 170C   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 170T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 191 - General Biology
Credits:   3.00 hours
A survey of life from the standpoint of man, structural and behavioral evolution, functional characteristics, and relationship to the natural world. The laboratory exercises involve simple investigations of the life processes by utilizing basic research tools. Here too, animal forms are emphasized, with specimens ranging from live protoza and planaria to preserved frogs.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 191L

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BIO 191L - General Biology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 191

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BIO 192 - Biology I (Botany)
Credits:   4.00 hours
An introduction to the biology of plants and their ancestors. Topics include cell structure and function, cell chemistry, photosynthesis and cellular respiration. The tissues, roots, stems and leaves are studied covering such topics as conduction, absorption, translocation and reproduction. A phylogenetic comparison among plant groups and their ancestors is the underlying theme. (May be taken independently or as part of a two course sequence with BIO 193.)
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 192L

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BIO 192L - Biology I (Botany Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
An introduction to the biology of plants and their ancestors. Topics include cell structure and function, cell chemistry, photosynthesis and cellular respiration. The tissues, roots, stems and leaves are studied covering such topics as conduction, absorption, translocation and reproduction. A phylogenetic comparison among plant groups and their ancestors is the underlying theme. (May be taken independently or as part of a two course sequence with BIO 193.)
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 192T

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BIO 192T - Biology I (Botany)
Credits:   4.00 hours
An introduction to the biology of plants and their ancestors. Topics include cell structure and function, cell chemistry, photosynthesis and cellular respiration. The tissues, roots, stems and leaves are studied covering such topics as conduction, absorption, translocation and reproduction. A phylogenetic comparison among plant groups and their ancestors is the underlying theme. (May be taken independently or as part of a two course sequence with BIO 193.)
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 192L

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BIO 193 - Biology II (Zoology)
Credits:   4.00 hours
An introduction to the biology of animals and their ancestors. Topics include structure and function of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems in animals. Genetics, development, behavior, ecology, and the evolution of major phyla are covered. A comparative approach is taken in studying the invertebrates and vertebrates including man. (May be taken independently or as a part of a two course sequence with BIO 192.)
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 193L

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BIO 193L - Biology II (Zoology Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 193

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BIO 197 - Human Biology
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introductory course that teaches biological principles by emphasizing the structural and functional aspects of the human body, especially as they relate to everyday existence. Includes discussion of important collateral issues such as the nature and course of disease, smoking and health, drug abuse, immunity and allergy, human genetics, birth-control, over-population, and venereal disease.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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BIO 198 - Entomology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The nature, structure, growth, and habits of insects and related forms are discussed. The beneficial and injurious effects of insects are covered. Recent breakthroughs and developments in the field of entomology are discussed. Skills are developed which enable the student to identify insect plant pests, diseases and injuries. Control measures and application equipment are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the various pest management options available to the homeowner and professionals in the field. IPM (integrated pest management) involves an understanding of pesticides, physical and mechanical controls, biological controls, cultural controls, and legal controls. Laws regulating the activities of pest control operators and the application of hazardous pesticides are discussed. A collection of insects and related forms is required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 198L

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BIO 198L - Entomology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 198T

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BIO 198T - Entomology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The nature, structure, growth, and habits of insects and related forms are discussed. The beneficial and injurious effects of insects are covered. Recent breakthroughs and developments in the field of entomology are discussed. Skills are developed which enable the student to identify insect plant pests, diseases and injuries. Control measures and application equipment are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the various pest management options available to the homeowner and professionals in the field. IPM (integrated pest management) involves an understanding of pesticides, physical and mechanical controls, biological controls, cultural controls, and legal controls. Laws regulating the activities of pest control operators and the application of hazardous pesticides are discussed. A collection of insects and related forms is required.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 198L

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BIO 210 - Introduction to Bioscience
Credits:   3.00 hours
Moving beyond the basic concepts of general biology, this class explores how biology is used in both academic and commercial settings within the fields of biotechnology, pharmaceutical and clinical sciences. Topics will include: applications of biotechnology in microbes, plants, and animals, the human genome project and its relation to medical biotechnology, DNA forensics, and pharmaceutical drug discovery, delivery, and FDA approval. The debate surrounding subjects such as cloning, stem cells, and genetically modified foods will also be discussed.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 212 - Bioscience Laboratory Practices
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to enable students to develop understanding of and proficient technical ability in basic bioscience laboratory practices. There is an in-depth presentation of laboratory safety standards, utilization of material safety data sheets, and the theoretical basis for a full range of preparatory and analytical methods and the opportunity to develop expertise in these methods with a variety of laboratory equipment. Students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook, analyze and display data in graphic form, and report results in a standard format.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Co-Requisites:   BIO 212L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 212L - Bioscience Laboratory Practices (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course is designed to enable students to develop understanding of and proficient technical ability in basic bioscience laboratory practices. There is an in-depth presentation of laboratory safety standards, utilization of material safety data sheets, and the theoretical basis for a full range of preparatory and analytical methods and the opportunity to develop expertise in these methods with a variety of laboratory equipment. Students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook, analyze and display data in graphic form, and report results in a standard format.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Co-Requisites:   BIO 212T

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BIO 212T - Bioscience Laboratory Practices
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to enable students to develop understanding of and proficient technical ability in basic bioscience laboratory practices. There is an in-depth presentation of laboratory safety standards, utilization of material safety data sheets, and the theoretical basis for a full range of preparatory and analytical methods and the opportunity to develop expertise in these methods with a variety of laboratory equipment. Students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook, analyze and display data in graphic form, and report results in a standard format.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 212L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 220 - Medical Microbiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The role of microbes as causative agents of disease in human hosts; the morphological characterization of pathogenic species, classification of communicable diseases and epidemiological aspects. Host-parasite relationship, infection, and host-resistance mechanisms; sero-diagnostic methods in medical practice. Chemotherapy, mode of action of antibiotics, sterilization, disinfection methods and contamination control.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 220L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 171   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 220L - Medical Microbiology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The role of microbes as causative agents of disease in human hosts; the morphological characterization of pathogenic species, classification of communicable diseases and epidemiological aspects. Host-parasite relationship, infection, and host-resistance mechanisms; sero-diagnostic methods in medical practice. Chemotherapy, mode of action of antibiotics, sterilization, disinfection methods and contamination control.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 220T

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BIO 220T - Medical Microbiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The role of microbes as causative agents of disease in human hosts; the morphological characterization of pathogenic species, classification of communicable diseases and epidemiological aspects. Host-parasite relationship, infection, and host-resistance mechanisms; sero-diagnostic methods in medical practice. Chemotherapy, mode of action of antibiotics, sterilization, disinfection methods and contamination control.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 220L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 171   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 171T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 166T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 170T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 223 - Principles of Ecology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The course introduces the student to the nature of ecosystems, community organization and dynamics, and population growth and regulation. The laboratory will be primarily field oriented.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 223L

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BIO 223L - Principles of Ecology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 223

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BIO 235 - Marine Biology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The ecological principles of the marine environment will be examined. There will be an emphasis on the classification, identification and economic importance of both the animals (Protozoa-Chordata) and the algae (microscopic and macroscopic). The flora and fauna of the Long Island region will be stressed with field trips and collections being an integral part of the course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 235L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 235L - Marine Biology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 235
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 240 - Bioethics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover ethical issues raised as a result of modern advances in biotechnology which directly affect the quality of human life. Bioethics comprises every possible aspect of health care: medical, moral, political, religious, legal and financial. It scrutinizes outmoded laws and deals with the enormous growth in available medical services. It takes into account our views of ourselves as members of a humane society.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Nursing
Sciences - Health Professions
Nursing
Dental Hygiene
Bioscience
Health Studies
Dental Hygiene

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BIO 240W - Bioethics (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover ethical issues raised as a result of modern advances in biotechnology which directly affect the quality of human life. Bioethics comprises every possible aspect of health care; medical, moral, political, religious, legal and financial. It scrutinizes outmoded laws and deals with the enormous growth in available medical services. It takes into account our views of ourselves as members of a humane society. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 256 - Environmental Sampling and Analysis
Credits:   0.00 or 3.00 hours
Proper field techniques for sampling the water, land, and air environments will be emphasized. Laboratory procedures will involve the analysis of both chemical and biological parameters, including wastewater analysis, using New York State approved methodology. Vegetative transecting and beach contouring will also be included. Data presentation and report writing will be emphasized. Field trips and study will be an integral and required part of this course. Discussion of environmental laws and impact statements will be included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 256L

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BIO 290 - Entomology II
Credits:   0.00 or 3.00 hours
Methods of greenhouse pest and disease control, including identification of major families of pests, diagnosis of diseases, principles of cultural and chemical control, and a survey of pests and diseases associated with economically important greenhouse crops.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 290L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 198   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 198T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 294 - Vertebrate Physiology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course investigates the principles of physiology in vertebrates with emphasis on mechanism of integration and homeostasis at the cellular, organ and system level. It explores the comparative, experimental and evolutionary aspects of all vertebrate classes and surveys the impact of recent advances in cellular and molecular biology on this branch of the biological sciences.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 295L

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BIO 295L - Vertebrate Physiology (Lab)
Credits:   1.00 hour
This laboratory course is an inquiry into the experimental methods and models for understanding vertebrate physiology. It will explore the comparative, experimental and evolutionary aspects of the mechanisms of integration and homeostasis among select vertebrate classes. Laboratory exercises incorporate computer software-based exercises with classic physiology experiments designed to illustrate both the basic concepts of physiology as well as the comparative nature of these events in a number of vertebrate species.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 294

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BIO 315 - Industrial Microbiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course will examine bioprocess fermentation methods and system designs that make use of microbial cells. Special conditions required for such biological materials as insect cell culture and plant tissue culture will also be surveyed Procedures relating to sanitation, process safety, raw material documentation and maintenance, growth monitoring, harvesting, processing, and packaging will be included. Quality assurance methodology and regulatory requirements are cited in each aspect of this operation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   CHM 152   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 152T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 340 - Biopharmaceutical Regulation
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces the student to Current Good Laboratory Practice(cGCP), Cueerent Good Clinical Practice (cGCP) and Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) as defined in the Code of federal Regulations Title 21. These regulations apply to all aspects of testing, clinical trials and manufacturing of Biopharmaceutical products under the authority of the Food and Drug Administration. The course will examine the application of these regulations to the bioprocessing, pharmaceutical, neutraceutical, cosmeceutical and allied industries.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 343 - Principles of Genetics - Theory
Credits:   3.00 hours
A thorough study of Genetics intended for majors in the Bioscience Curriculum. Topics to be covered include cytogenetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics. Computer simulations and demonstrations will present genetic principles. Students will utilize computerized databases to complete independent genomic search assignments.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Sciences - Health Professions
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 344L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212C   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 343T - Principals of Genetics
Credits:   3.00 hours
A thorough study of Genetics intended for majors in the Bioscience Curriculum. Topics to be covered include cytogenetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics. Computer simulations and demonstrations will present genetic principles. Students will utilize computerized databases to complete independent genomic search assignments.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 344L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: C )     and   ( BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212C   Minimum Grade: C )     and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227T   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 344L - Principles of Genetics (Lab)
Credits:   1.00 hour
Laboratory exercises include both computer simulations and the use of living organisms to illustrate genetic principles and techniques. Students will collect data utilizing standard genetics investigational techniques.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Sciences - Health Professions
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 343T
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212C   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227T   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 345 - Introduction to Bioinformatics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is intended to teach the basic tools used in bioinformatics in order to investigate biological questions. Students will conduct independent projects utilizing existing computer programs and databases for gene searches, sequence comparisons, and phylogenetic analysis.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Sciences - Health Professions
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C   and   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 243   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 244L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 348 - Cell Biology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course investigates how cells develop, work, communicate, and control their activities. Topics include basic biochemistry and metabolism, DNA structure and function, membrane/organelle function and transport, cell communication, the cytoskeleton, and cell division. At the completion of this course the student should be able to engage in the broad themes of cell and molecular biology, and to relate these concepts to other studies in biology and other disciplines.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 349L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212C   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 348T - Cell Biology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course investigates how cells develop, work, communicate, and control their activities. Topics include basic biochemistry and metabolism, DNA structure and function, membrane/organelle function and transport, cell communication, the cytoskeleton, and cell division. At the completion of this course the student should be able to engage in the broad themes of cell and molecular biology, and to relate these concepts to other studies in biology and other disciplines.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 349L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: C )     and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   ( BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212C   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 212T   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227T   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 349L - Cell Biology (Lab)
Credits:   1.00 hour
This course introduces students to the theory and methodology of protocols routinely used in research laboratories investigating cell structure and function. Students have the opportunity to use both common and high tech instruments to perform weekly laboratory exercises. Experimental design, controls and data presentation and analysis are emphasized.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Academic and Public Service
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 348T
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   and   MLT 227   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 353 - Essentials of Plant Pathology
Credits:   3.00 hours
The study of the development of plant diseases caused by Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Virolds. Major diseases of economically important plants are emphasized. The disease process and disease cycles for representative pathogens are covered in relation to plant disease control methods.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 354L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 353T - Essentials of Plant Pathology
Credits:   3.00 hours
The study of the development of plant diseases caused by Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Virolds. Major diseases of economically important plants are emphasized. The disease process and disease cycles for representative pathogens are covered in relation to plant disease control methods.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 354L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 354L - Essentials of Plant Pathology (Lab)
Credits:   1.00 hour
The laboratory is designed to enable the student to acquire skills in collection and examination methods used for the diagnosis of plant diseases produced by biotic and abiotic agents, using microbial isolation and culturing techniques where applicable. The student will learn to recognize and identify (directly or indirectly) biotic plant pathogens among the Plants, Animals, Fungi, Protists, Bacteria, Viruses and Viroids.
Lecture:   0.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 353T
Pre-requisites:   BIO 192   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 192T   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 355 - Ecological Topics: The Structure and Function of Nature
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course theory introduces students to basic ecological concepts as they relate to the biotic and abiotic environment. It stresses the diversity of life and the impact that man, other organisms and environment have on each other. Laboratory exercises and field work will investigate the effects organisms have on each other as well as the effects of environmental conditions on growth and development. Students will also characterize the nature of selected site(s) in terms of species diversity using plot sampling techniques. Seminar type discussions require individuals or small groups to explore environmental issues. Topics for these discussions will be submitted to the instructor for appropriateness and approval. Students will be required to research and prepare a paper as well as make a presentation to the class. The class will be given the opportunity to question each speaker following that individual's presentation. 1 year of college biology or permission of instructor.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 355L

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BIO 355L - Ecological Topics : The Structure and Function of Nature (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course theory introduces students to basic ecological concepts as they relate to the biotic and abiotic environment. It stresses the diversity of life and the impact that man, other organisms and environment have on each other. Laboratory exercises and field work will investigate the effects organisms have on each other as well as the effects of environmental conditions on growth and development. Students will also characterize the nature of selected site(s) in terms of species diveristy using plot sampling techniques. Seminar type dicsussions require individuals or small groups to explore environmental issues. Topics for these discussions will be submitted to the instructor for apporpriateness and approval. Students will be required to research and prepare a paper as well as make a presentation to the class. The class will be given the opportunity to question each speaker following that individual's presentation. 1 year of college biology or permission of instructor.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 355T

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BIO 355T - Ecological Topics: The Structure and Function of Nature
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course theory introduces students to basic ecological concepts as they relate to the biotic and abiotic environment. It stresses the diversity of life and the impact that man, other organisms and environment have on each other. Laboratory exercises and field work will investigate the effects organisms have on each other as well as the effects of environmental conditions on growth and development. Students will also characterize the nature of selected site(s) in terms of species diveristy using plot sampling techniques. Seminar type dicsussions require individuals or small groups to explore environmental issues. Topics for these discussions will be submitted to the instructor for apporpriateness and approval. Students will be required to research and prepare a paper as well as make a presentation to the class. The class will be given the opportunity to question each speaker following that individual's presentation. 1 year of college biology or permission of instructor.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 355L

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BIO 380 - Pre-Professional Experience I
Credits:   3.00 hours
Recommended students will engage in one of the following for at least 135 hours: 1) health care volunteer work that involves patient assistance in the health care environment; 2) shadowing of a health care professional (physician, physician assistant, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dentist, veterinarian, etc) The final grade is assigned by the internship coordinator based on consultation with the supervisor/health professional and evaluation of reports, logs and a final report prepared by the student. Students must submit a resume to the internship coordinator at least 3 months before registering for the course. Additional prerequisites: recommendation by two Biology faculty members, submission of a resume to the internship coordinator at least 3 months prior to registering for the course, approval of the internship coordinator. HIPAA training must be completed before starting the course. IRB training may be required for some sites. Additional courses in Human Anatomy and Physiology and/or medical microbiology recommended for some sites.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Sciences - Health Professions
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 130   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 130T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 131   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 131T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 166T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 170T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 171   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 171T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 220   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 220T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 316   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 381 - Pre-Professional Experience II
Credits:   3.00 hours
Recommended for students engaged in one of the following for at least 135 hours: 1) health care volunteer work that involves patient assistance in the health care environment; 2) shadowing of a health care professional (physician, physician assistant, physical therapist, occupational therapist, dentist, veterinarian, etc.) The final grade is assigned by the Internship Coordinator based on consultation with the supervisor/health professional and evaluation of reports, logs, and a final report prepared by the student. Prerequisite(s): recommendation by two Biology faculty members, submission of a resume to the Internship Coordinator at least 3 months prior to registering for the course, approval of the Internship Coordinator; additional courses in Human Anatomy & Physiology and/or Medical Microbiology recommended for some sites. HIPAA training must be completed before starting the course. IRB training may be required at some sites.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 380   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 414 - Microbiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
Based on contemporary applications of microbiology, this course is designed to present both fundamental concepts of microbial physiology and growth as well as microbial control measures ranging from asepsis to antibiosis. The role of microorganisms in natural ecosystems, research, manufacturing and human infection will be explored, with emphasis on prokaryotic genetics and metabolism. Mechanisms of evolution will be discussed within the context of emerging pathogens and novel bioengineered organisms. The dynamics between the human microbiome and resistance to infection will be presented along with basic epidemiological models.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 414L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 212   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 414L - Microbiology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 414T

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BIO 414T - Microbiology
Credits:   4.00 hours
Based on comtemporary applications of microbiology, this course iis designed to present both fundamental concepts of microbial physiology and growth as well as microbial control measures ranging from asepsis to antibiosis. The role of microorganisms in natural ecosystems, research, manufacturing and human infection will be explored, with emphasis on prokaryotic genetics and metabolism. Mechanisms of evolution will be discussed within the context of emerging pathogens and novel bioengineered organisms. The dynamics between hte human microbiome and resistance to infection will be presented along with basic epidemiological models.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 414L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 210   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 210T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 212   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 212T   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: D   or   ( BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: D   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BIO 415 - Human Virology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will focus on specific human viruses, including papilloma, herpes, smallpox, polio, measles, HIV, influenza, SARS, and hepatitis viruses. Lecture will cover viral strategies of invasion; viral lifecycles; viral offense and host defense; prevention and control of viral diseases; approaches for studying viruses; public health.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Sciences - Health Professions
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 416 - Industrial Microbiology
Credits:   3.00 to 4.00 hours
This course will examine bioprocess fermentation methods and system designs that make use of microbial cells. Special conditions required for such biological materials as insect cell culture and plant tissue culture will also be surveyed. Procedures relating to sanitation, process safety, raw material documentation and maintenance, growth monitoring , harvesting, processing and packaging will be included. Quality assurance methodology and regulatory requirements are cited in each aspect of this operation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 316   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 153   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 441 -
Credits:   5.00 hours
A detailed introduction to molecular biology, the course covers the techniques common to all molecular biology such as nucleic acid separation and visualization, PCR blotting, and sequencing. In addition, the course focuses on topics such as transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination. Each is presented from both the view of prokaryotes as well was eukaryotes. Scientific journal articles highlighting class topics will be used to supplement class lectures.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Sciences - Health Professions
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 347   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C )     and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 441L - Introduction to Molecular Biology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A detailed introduction to molecular biology, the course covers the techniques common to all molecular biology such as nucleic acid separation and visualization, PCR blotting, and sequencing. In addition, the course focuses on topics such as transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination. Each is presented from both the view of prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes. Scientific journal articles highlighting class topics will be used to supplement class lectures.
Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Sciences - Health Professions
Medical Technology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441T

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BIO 441T - Introduction to Molecular Biology
Credits:   5.00 hours
A detailed introduction to molecular biology, the course covers the techniques common to all molecular biology such as nucleic acid separation and visualization, PCR blotting, and sequencing. In addition, the course focuses on topics such as transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination. Each is presented from both the view of prokaryotes as well was eukaryotes. Scientific journal articles highlighting class topics will be used to supplement class lectures.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 347   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C )     or   ( BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C )  

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BIO 444 - Forensic Molecular Biology
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course explores advanced molecular biological techniques and concepts as they apply to the study of forensic investigation. The course will cover background information on body fluid identification, DNA structure and function, analytical DNA techniques, and review advancements in the field of DNA typing. The primary focus will be the molecular biological technique known as short tandem repeats (STR) testing. Other topics covered include case studies, sample handling, DNA databanking (CODIS), mass disaster identification, Y chromosomal analysis, paternity testing, and validation procedures. The laboratory component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in techniques and experiments that are currently being employed by forensic biology laboratories across the country. Students who have completed BIO 430 or CRJ 430 may not receive credit for this course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 444L
Pre-requisites:   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   and   CRJ 201   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 444L -
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 444

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BIO 450 - Pharmaceutical Production Methods
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course provides a study of pharmaceutical dosage forms with emphasis on their formulation, development and technologies of production. Attention is directed toward the dosage form design, formulation and in-vitro performance testing of compressed tablets, hard gelatin capsules, and controlled-release tablets. There is also an examination of methods of production, technology and regulation of sterile solutions, suspensions and lyophilized products at the product development scale, with appropriate application of good manufacturing practices. There is an introduction to pharmaceutical biotechnology techniques involved in the biosynthesis, formulation and delivery of peptide and protein therapeutic agents. The concepts of gene therapy and vaccine design are also presented.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 340   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 160   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 160T   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 271   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 271T   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 270   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 270T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 452 - Biomaterial Processing
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course deals with the modification of properties of natural and artificial biomaterials and the production of edible products or raw materials for the pharmaceutical, nutriceutical, and cosmeceutical industries. There will be an introduction to the design of applications for by-product recovery and recycling, environmental, food processing, and biomedical industries. Commercialization of biomaterial feed stocks, biotechnology output, and bioprocessing by-products into traditional and alternative products will be explored.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 414   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 260   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 271   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 271T   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 455 - Validation and Regulatory Affairs
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction is provided to governmental oversight of drugs, devices and biotherapeutics, and the laws and regulations that apply to development, testing and validation of methods and equipment. There is a survey of the history of US food and drug law, the creation of the FDA, and the current organization and responsibilities of the FDA. Specific US laws and regulations applicable to drugs, devices and biologics and international regulations and import/export concerns are examined. Prerequisite required or equivalent industrial experience with approval of department chair.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 340   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 457 - Bioinformatics Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of Bioinformatics. Students will study the technology concepts required in this field, including the theory and design of databases, access to genome information sources of data, and tool for data mining. This course will also cover identification for- both lower order and higher order informational patterns in DNA and approaches to linking genome data to information on gene functions. Emphasis will be placed on how to use the database and tools Laboratory activities include the use of databases and tools to prepare analyses and report making use of search techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BCS 215   Minimum Grade: D   and   BCS 316   Minimum Grade: D   and   BCS 260   Minimum Grade: D

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BIO 460 - Topics in Biology
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of current discoveries and applications of biology, with emphasis on student participation and written assignments. Critical thinking will be developed concerning the validity of popular reports and extraordinary claims. Ongoing discoveries in biology will be analyzed according to their contributions to the advancement of knowledge, their possible commercial medical, or agricultural applications, and ethical issues that they may arise. Resources that will be utilized include current scientific literature, guest lectures, and the World Wide Web.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 470 - Bioscience Senior Seminar
Credits:   3.00 hours
The capstone course in the Bioscience Program, utilizes guest speakers and student literature searches to explore the state of the entire field of Bioscience. Each student is required to write a paper on an approved topic in the field of Bioscience based on primary sources in the scientific literature, and to present a seminar at which the student will defend his or her correlations and conclusions about the topic.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441
Pre-requisites:   BIO 316   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 470W - Bioscience Senior Seminar (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
The capstone course in the Bioscience program, utilizes guest speakers and student literature searches to explore the state of the entire field of Bioscience. Each student is required to write a paper on an approval topic in the field of Bioscience based on primary sources in the scientific literature, and to present a seminar at which the student will defend his or her correlations and conclusions about the topic. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Sciences - Health Professions
Bioscience
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441
Pre-requisites:   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 348   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 348T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 349L   Minimum Grade: C   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 476 - Bioscience Internship A1
Credits:   1.00 hour
Bioscience majors may be recommended for or invited into one or more assignments in the Bioscience Internship Series, with the course number selected according to the length of the internship and whether it is a first or subsequent internship. Bioscience Internships A1 & A2 (BIO 476 & 477) represent short preliminary projects for 45 hours earning 1 credit. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 316   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 347   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 477 - Bioscience Internship A2
Credits:   1.00 hour
Bioscience majors may be recommended for or invited into one or more assignments in the Bioscience Internship Series, with the course number selected according to the length of the internship and whether it is a first or subsequent internship. Bioscience Internships A1 & A2 (BIO 476 & 477) represent short preliminary projects for 45 hours earning 1 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 476   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 478 - Bioscience Internship B1
Credits:   2.00 hours
Bioscience Internships B1 & B2 (BIO 478 & 479) represents intermediate projects for 90 hours earning 2 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 316   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 343   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 343T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 347   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 344L   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 479 - Bioscience Internship B2
Credits:   2.00 hours
Bioscience Internships B1 & B2 (BIO 478 & 479) represent intermediate projects for 90 credits hours earning 2 credits Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 478   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 480 - Bioscience Internship I
Credits:   3.00 hours
Bioscience Internship I, represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Co-Requisites:   BIO 441
Pre-requisites:   BIO 347   Minimum Grade: C

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BIO 481 - Bioscience Internship II
Credits:   3.00 hours
Bioscience Internships II, represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Bioscience
Pre-requisites:   BIO 480   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 482 - Bioscience Internship III
Credits:   3.00 hours
Bioscience Internship III, represents intermediate projects for 135 hours 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 481   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 483 - Bioscience Internship IV
Credits:   3.00 hours
Bioscience Internship IV, represents substantial projects or work experiences for 135 hours earning 3 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   9.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 482   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 484 - Bioscience Internship V
Credits:   4.00 hours
Bioscience Internship V, represent longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Submission of resume 3 months in advance; Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   12.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 480   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 485 - Bioscience Internship VI
Credits:   4.00 hours
Bioscience Internship VI, represents longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   12.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 484   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 486 - Bioscience Internship VII
Credits:   4.00 hours
Bioscience Internship VII, represents longer and more extensive projects or work experiences of 180 hours earning 4 credits. Note: Students seeking credit for health care shadowing/assisting and/or volunteer work should register for BIO 380 and/or BIO 381 instead. Note: Previous Internship with a B or better, Biology faculty recommendation or invitation.
Lab:   12.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Pre-requisites:   BIO 485   Minimum Grade: B

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BIO 490 - Bioscience
Credits:   8.00 hours
An intensive bioscience research experience for selected student in a research laboratory under the supervision of faculty engaged in current investigations in the field of bioscience. The student will be expected to commit himself / herself to a full weekly schedule of laboratory research activity and tutorials for a semester or summer to gain professional expertise in laboratory procedures, record keeping, operation of laboratory equipment, experimental design, and preparation of data for scientific publication presentation and oral presentation. Technical Elective for Bioscience majors.
Lecture:   4.00 hours Lab:   12.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology

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Business Administration

BUS 101 - Accounting I
Credits:   3.00 hours
Fundamental accounting concepts and principles are covered through an understanding of the following topics: accounting as an information system; analyzing a transaction; the accounting cycle; accounting for both service enterprises and merchandising businesses; deferrals and accruals; reversing entries; systems design; accounting for cash, receivables, temporary investments and inventory; payroll accounting. Students apply concepts to the preparation of special journals, subsidiary ledgers, worksheets and financial statements.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 102 - Accounting II
Credits:   3.00 hours
Continued development of the principles and concepts introduced in Accounting I. The following topics are included: emphasis on further understanding of generally accepted accounting principles; plant assets; intangible assets; determination of depreciation, depletion and amortization; accounting for partnerships and corporations; long term liabilities; investments in bonds and stock; statement of cash flows; managerial accounting; accounting for manufacturing operations; budgeting and standard costs systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 101   Minimum Grade: C   or   BUS 101R   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 109 - Management Theories and Practices
Credits:   3.00 hours
This introductory course covers management principles pertaining to human resources, individual behavior in organizations, employee motivation and performance, and business ethics. Topics also include managing and the manager’s job; planning and decision making; employee performance appraisal and feedback; leadership and influence processes; interpersonal relations and communication; and managing work groups and teams. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for BUS 211
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 111 - Introduction to Business
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of American Business and its contemporary environment. It provides an overview of organizational, national, and international trends and their impact on enterprises both large and small. The course develops an understanding of important business concepts, principles, and practices that explain how businesses are formed, how they operate to accomplish their goals, and why/how their success depends on effective management, production, marketing and finance/accounting.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 121 - Business Mathematics
Credits:   3.00 hours
The fundamentals of applied mathematics in the field of accounting, finance, marketing, and selling. Topics include interest, bank discount, insurance, and annuities. The use of arithmetic as a managerial tool is stressed.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 131 - Marketing Principles
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides the student with a sound knowledge of the basic elements of the marketing process. Major topics include the features of consumer and organizational markets, market segmentation, and target market strategies. Product planning and development, brands, packaging and other product features are covered. Price determination and the use of various pricing strategies are discussed. The factors in the selection of channels of distribution and the features of wholesaling and retailing are considered. Elements of the promotional process such as sales, advertising, and sales promotion are included. Ethical and legal issues in marketing, marketing of services, global marketing, and marketing on the Internet are also covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:    

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BUS 141 - Contemporary Business Communications
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the role and importance of effective communications in business. Key topics include the familiarization and practice in preparing common types of internal and external business communications; contemporary issues in business communication relating to technology, ethics, and nondiscriminatory language; memo and report writing with proper mechanics, style, and appropriate tone/attitude; and business presentations.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BCS 191   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 188 - Advertising Art and Applications
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will combine basic advertising principles with practical media application. This course shall introduce students to the business of advertising in a contemporary global environment. The course will explore concepts of advertising, including elements of media selection and copywriting within the parameters of internal budgets, management and the application of actual advertising creation. In addition, students will create advertising, integrating the roles of the creative director and marketing manager. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for VIS 188.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 201 - Corporate Finance
Credits:   3.00 hours
The overall aim of this course is to help students develop an understanding and appreciation of Finance as a business discipline - an analytical approach in assessing the financial worthiness of a business entity is stressed. Topics covered include time value of money; financial statement analysis; valuation models; risks and rates of return; calculating beta coefficients; working capital management; capital budgeting; the cost of capital leverage and dividend policy; and financial forecasting.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 101   Minimum Grade: D   and   BUS 102   Minimum Grade: D   or   ( BUS 101R   Minimum Grade: D   and   BUS 102R   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 202 - Business Law I
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the nature and sources of law; the role the legal system; the law of torts and crimes; the law of contracts; and real and personal property.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 209 - Teamwork and Team Building
Credits:   3.00 hours
The following topics will be discussed and analyzed: teams in organizations, understanding team building and development, working in groups and teams, team roles and processes, being a team leader, and handling team conflict. The culmination of these concepts and functions, referred to as "team forming, storming, norming, and performing," will also be covered. Case studies will be used extensively.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 220 - Financial Information Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will further the understanding of accounting theory and will provide the opportunity to achieve competency in the use of computerized applications. The course will introduce students to internal control theory within a computerized financial information system. Use of the Web for accessing relevant information will also be introduced.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Co-Requisites:   BUS 102
Pre-requisites:   BUS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 101R   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 230 - Environmental Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
This elective course addresses concerns pertaining to the business environment, instructing students as to the unified ecological approach to which affect management. The political approach to business environmental concerns in the context of constitutional, common law and administrative law theories and case and statutory analysis are examined, referencing basic natural science technology. Designed as a first law course it introduces the business, horticulture and industrial technology student to the legal process applying relevant components of environmental law studies. A nationally adopted text of a major law publisher and contemporary business periodical articles on assigned topics are to be used extensively.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 232 - Electronic Commerce
Credits:   3.00 hours
This cross-listed business management and business computer systems course covers electronic commerce (EC) foundations, retailing methodologies, and marketing research. Focus will be on the various forms, strategies, and implementations of EC including business-to-business (B2B), business-to-consumer (B2C) and consumer-to-consumer (C2C). Also covered will be social networking, electronic payment systems, and public policy issues including privacy and intellectual property matters as well as recent information technology advancements. Students completing this course may not receive credit for BCS 232.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BCS 102   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 101   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 232W - Electronic Commerce (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides an understanding of the evolving Internet technologies. It primarily explores the business implications of these developments. It explores the tools, skills and business and social implications of emergence of electronic commerce in the cyberspace. In addition to acquiring basic skills for navigating the Internet and creating personal and business electronic presence on the World Wide Web, the students re-examine fundamental processes of business as it is performed in the cyberspace in contrast to the market place. This helps the students evolve a perspective about the business in the next century and helps them understand changes as the cyberspace grows increasingly important in the global economy. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   or   ( BCS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 102   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 240 - Business Statistics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers statistical concepts and techniques as applied to business applications. Topics include: data classification; experimental design; descriptive statistics; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability concepts; binomial, Poisson and normal distributions; central limit theorem and confidence intervals. Extensive use of Excel to assist in the computational and graphical aspects of the subject.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   MTH 015   Minimum Grade: D   or   Math Placement Level   2  

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BUS 250 - Consumer Behavior
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course recognizes the central role of consumers in determining the fate of a firm's marketing efforts. Topics covered include the understanding of consumer motivation, perception, and learning, as well as the recognition of social influences on consumer behavior such as reference groups, opinion leadership, culture, and subcultures. Emphasis will be on the consumer's decision making process so that students can make more informed choices in the marketplace. Topics also include the methods marketers use to influence consumer behavior and corresponding ethical and legal issues. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 251 - Retailing
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course helps students develop an understanding of the relationship of retailing to the marketing process and describes the fundamentals of modern retailing. A study is made of modern retail institutions.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 253 - Industrial Marketing
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course focuses on the marketing of industrial goods and services to industrial markets. Industrial product planning, channels of distribution, promotional activities and pricing strategies are emphasized. Other topics such as understanding industrial buying and evaluating potential markets are also covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 254 - Salesmanship
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course emphasizes the creative selling techniques used by professional salespeople. It covers all the important elements of the personal selling process with special emphasis placed on determining prospects' needs, translating features into benefits, overcoming objections and closing methods. Participants will demonstrate their ability to apply the techniques discussed by delivering sales presentations. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 255 - Managerial Psychology
Credits:   3.00 hours
The application of psychological principles to business and industrial situations is made. This includes the examination of the individual and his or her behavior as the dynamics of group activity.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 256 - Sales Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
The major problems of sales management in the distribution of products and services; the selection, recruitment, and training of sales personnel; measurement of the effectiveness of salespeople, supervision and compensation of salespeople; sales quotas and budgets.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 254   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 257 - Advertising Principles
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course uses practical concepts to examine the role of advertising in the marketing process. Topics covered include: ethical issues involved in advertising, various types of advertising used by marketers, services performed by ad agencies, the creative side of advertising including basic elements of copywriting and design, how to prepare an ad budget, and the elements of media selection. Also covered are the various types of advertising media including magazines, newspapers, outdoor, transit, yellow pages, and direct mail as well as the features of advertising on television, radio and the Internet.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 258 - Production Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
Presents a survey which informs the student about the development of modern industry and scientific management and will enable him/her to grasp the operating principles.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 259 - Public Relations
Credits:   3.00 hours
Principles and practices of building good public relations between industry and employees, stockholders, consumers, suppliers and the press. The development of public relations as a top-management function.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 259W - Public Relations (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
Principles and practices of building good public relations between industry and employees, stockholders, consumers, suppliers and the press. The development of public relations as a top- management function. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Academic and Public Service
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 266 - Personnel Human Resource Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course develops an understanding of the important functions and tasks performed by the modern human resource department such as staffing, training, employee safety and compensation. Emphasis throughout will be on the partnership to ensure a motivated work force.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 267 - Small Business Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course helps students develop an understanding of the relationship of small business management to the management process. It describes the fundamentals of small business management. A study is made of major problems and pitfalls faced by managers of small businesses.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 268 - Industrial Purchasing
Credits:   3.00 hours
The principles and techniques of purchasing as they apply in actual practice today. The purchasing area will be treated as a specialized function in the business organization. Constructive aspects of purchasing with emphasis on long-term policies and profit-making opportunities.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 271 - Intermediate Accounting I
Credits:   3.00 hours
An in-depth study of the principles related to financial accounting topics and a study of recent developments in financial accounting required by the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Topics include the following: development of accounting standards; nature of the conceptual framework, assumptions and principles; review of the accounting process; continued study of the Income Statement, Balance Sheet and Statement of Cash Flows; time value of money; cash and receivables, inventories; acquisition and disposal of property, plant and equipment; depreciation and depletion; intangible assets; long-term investment in Equity Securities and other assets.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 101   Minimum Grade: D   and   BUS 102   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 272 - Intermediate Accounting II
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of the study of the principles related to financial accounting. This study will include a presentation of the following topics: stockholders' equity; dilutive securities; revenue recognition; accounting for income taxes; accounting for pensions and for leases; accounting changes and error analysis, full disclosure in financial reporting; financial reporting and changing prices; liabilities-current and contingent; liabilities-long term.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 271   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 273 - Cost Accounting
Credits:   3.00 hours
Principles of cost accounting applied to manufacturing industries. The use of cost data and procedures under job order, process cost, and standard cost accounting systems as a tool of management.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 101   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 101R   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BUS 102   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 102R   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 275 - Principles of Taxes
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers fundamental principles of income taxation under the Internal Revenue Code, related Regulations and Court cases. Tax treatment of the individual is stressed, with emphasis on tax status, items of income included or exempt from gross income; adjustments to income; deductions; and realization and recognition of capital gains and losses. Corporate taxation and tax accounting are also covered. Students are taught to identify tax problems, and gain the skills necessary to solve those problems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 278 - Business Project
Credits:   1.00 or 3.00 hours
This is an independent study course designed to offer a student experience in research and performing special projects in business and/or related area of interest. A faculty member shall act as a Project Advisor. The project selected will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous business administration and related courses. The number of credits received will be determined by the complexity of the project and agreed upon prior to the student's starting the course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair.
Lecture:   1.00 or 3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:    

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BUS 279 - Business Internship
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is an elective for second year Business Administration students. The purpose of this course is to provide an employer/student designed internship experience to the second-year Business student. During the internship, the student will acquire work skills and cooperative work attitudes that will compliment the academic skills learned during the student's prior year.
Lecture:   0.00 hours Other:   6.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 280 - International Business
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will cover the rapid growth of international business and proliferation of multinational firms. Topics include the nature of international business and the historical development of global markets and marketing.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 291 - Investments
Credits:   3.00 hours
To familiarize students with financial literature and facilities that are available as guides to the proper selection of securities and other types of investments. The course is covered from the perspective of the individual investor. As such, a logical portfolio commensurate with the financial goals of the individual is stressed. Financial information available both in published as well as Internet access format are covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 298 - Real Estate Law I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is the first half of a two-semester Real Estate Law course offered to familiarize the layperson, investor, prospective real estate salesperson, and real estate broker with the real estate field. Successful completion of BUS 298 complies with Department of State requirements to take licensing test for salespersons. Successful completion of both BUS 298 and BUS 299 meets the requirements to take licensing test for real estate broker. Applicants must complete BUS 298 in order to be eligible to take BUS 299.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 299 - Real Estate Law II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is the second half of a two-semester Real Estate Law course offered to familiarize the layperson, investor, prospective real estate salesperson, and real estate broker with the real estate field. Successful completion of BUS 298 complies with Department of State requirements to take licensing test for salespersons. Successful completion of both BUS 298 and BUS 299 meets the requirements to take licensing test for real estate broker.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 298   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 300 - Operations Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course provides a conceptual foundation for more advanced courses in various management specialization's including operations strategies; competitiveness; productivity; product and service design; capacity planning; process selection and facility layout; design of work systems; location planning and analysis; and introduction to quality management. Note: Students who have previously completed IND 301 cannot receive credit for BUS 300.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 303 - Planning and Controlling Operation
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is an introduction to the concepts and techniques of sales and operations planning; managing inventory; master scheduling; material requirements planning; production activity control; supply chain information systems; process mapping; JIT/Lean production; and Kanban systems. Case studies covering these topics will be included. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BUS 303 and IND 303.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 304 - Business Law II
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the law of sales and lease contracts, letters of credit, commercial paper and secured transactions under the UCC and creditor's rights and remedies, including surety ship and guaranty, insurance, wills, trusts, elder law and consumer protection.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 202   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 305 - Entrepreneurship
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the process of creating and growing a new business venture through the introduction and development of a business idea. Also covered are the nature and importance of entrepreneurs, international entrepreneurship opportunities, and the development of business and marketing plans. Methods for financing the new venture through the use of case studies and practical applications will be discussed and covered in assignments. (3,0) Credits: 3
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 306 - Project and Contract Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the processes encountered in choosing, planning, controlling, and negotiating of projects and contracts in technologically based firms. Topics include project and contract; feasibility; risk analysis; selection; portfolio optimization; cost estimation and controls; capital budgeting; performance relating to negotiation, adjustments, and benchmark standards; and awareness and appreciation for ethical practices. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 306.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 310 - Principles of Taxation
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers fundamental principles of income taxation under the Internal Revenue Code, related Regulations and court cases. Tax treatment of the individual is stressed, with emphasis on filing status, income and business deductions, and realization and recognition of capital gains and losses. Corporate and partnership taxation are introduced. Students are taught to recognize tax issues and gain the skills necessary to solve those issues.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 102   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 311 - Organizational Behavior
Credits:   3.00 hours
This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communication and dynamics; decision making; causes and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power, and politics in organizations. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for PSY 311. Prerequisite(s) required or permission of department chair.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   PSY 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   PSY 131   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   or   PSY 101   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 311W - Organizational Behavior (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This upper-division course presents the concepts of organizational behavior and structure as well as topics relating to motivation content and process theories; group communication and dynamics; decision making; cause and resolutions of organizational conflicts; and factors pertaining to influence, power, and politics in organizations. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for PSY 311. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite(s) required or permissions of department chair.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 211   Minimum Grade: D   or   PSY 130   Minimum Grade: D   or   PSY 131   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 312 - Purchasing and Supply Chain Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the purchasing and movement of materials into, through, and out of a firm; fundamentals of domestic and international transportation systems; distribution center, warehouse, and plant location; and management of multinational organizations and supply networks. Note: Students who previously took IND 311 cannot receive credit for this course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 316 - Customer Relations & Quality
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the basics of customer relations and quality in industry. The course includes discussion of quality management principles and standards as well as feedback techniques to measure and assure customer satisfaction. The American Customer Satisfaction Index, J.D. Power and Associates Reports, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Automotive Quality System QS-9000 registration criteria will also be discussed. Note: Students completing this course cannot receive credit IND 316.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   IND 301   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 317 - Enterprise Resource Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) is an organizational and information systems approach that integrates planning, customer relationship management, decision making, master scheduling, material requirements planning, marketing, finance, electronic commerce, and human resources. The course will include lectures and extensive use of supporting ERP software. Note: Students who have previously completed BUS/IND 313 cannot receive credit for BUS 317. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for BCS 317.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 320 - International Marketing and Global Markets
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will examine the method by which manufacturing products and customer services are introduced in international markets. Emphasis will be placed on the marketing of sophisticated industrial products and marketing engineering product lines. Topics will include foreign market surveys and market research, joint ventures and establishing an overseas marketing and sales operations.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 320W - International Marketing (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will examine the method by which manufacturing products are introduced in international markets. Emphasis will be placed on the marketing of sophisticated industrial products and marketing engineering product lines. Topics will include foreign market surveys and market research, joint ventures and establishing an overseas marketing and sales operations. This course will involve actual student assignments in conjunction with the Small Business Development Center in determining the expansion of regionally produced manufacturing products into global markets. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 131   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 321 - International Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides study in the basic concepts and processes of the international legal system. The interaction of state, federal, and international law as well as the relationship of international law and the American legal system are explained. Particular attention is given to current problems faced by managers and to the dominant political, social economic, and technological forces influencing the evolution of international law.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 202   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 322 - International Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will examine the critical issues and practices of international management. Emphasis will be placed on the multicultural workforce and worldwide developments. Topics will include planning, political risk, organizing, decision-making, and controlling as pertaining to international management and operations. Students will study human resource/personnel issues concerning selection and repatriation, communication skills, and labor relations in a global context. Ethics and social responsibility as well as future trends of international management will be explored. The course will include student assignments and case studies examining the issues affecting small businesses expanding operations into foreign markets.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 327 - Risk Management and Insurance
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is designed to assist the student in the identification and analysis of the major types of financial risk management and insurance. The course will analyze the needs and problems faced by individuals and corporations regarding risk management exposure and how these exposures to risk are addressed through various forms of insurance. Case studies involving risk management, insurance, and relevant ethical factors will be covered.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 201   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 330 - Cost Management Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This upper-level course pertains to the key elements of cost management systems of manufacturing and service organizations. Topics covered include: using cost drivers and activity based costing; eliminating non-value added activities; costing product (service) life cycles; and justifying capital expenditures for computer integrated manufacturing systems. Prerequisite: two semesters of accounting.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 340 - Advanced Business Statistics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers advanced statistical concepts and techniques as applied to decision making and business applications. Topics include: estimating population values, hypothesis testing for one and two populations, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis and model building, statistical process control, analyzing and forecasting time-series data, and decision-making analysis. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 240   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 352 - Employment Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course reviews the field of law governing employment. Topics covered include the following: Employment relationship and procedure, selection, testing, privacy, termination, and arbitration; employment discrimination regarding the Civil Rights Act, Affirmative Action, racial discrimination, sex discrimination, family leave and pregnancy discrimination, sexual orientation, religious discrimination, national origin discrimination, age discrimination and disability discrimination. Also covered are employment regulations regarding unions and collective bargaining agreements, wage and hour regulations, occupational safety and health, workers' compensation, and employee benefits.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 202   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 360 - Leadership Theories Practices
Credits:   3.00 hours
The following will be covered: definition and significance of leadership; global and cultural contexts of leadership; early theories and practices: the foundations of modern leadership; individual differences and traits and the ability to lead; leadership and "emotional intelligence;" leadership and "the moral compass;" power, influence, and leadership; new models of leadership; leadership of non-profits; and leading change.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 366 - International Human Resource Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
The importance of managing cultural diversity is a critical component to deriving successful outcomes for the workplace endeavor as well as the criteria for individual advancement in one's career in the global arena. The rapidly expanding involvement of the United States in global business activities has created a critical need for international business talent in all areas of business, and in particular, successful management of cultural differences to advance the team and the entity. This course addresses the understanding of cultural differences in global business and the art of negotiation to gain a win/win.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 379 - Business Internship
Credits:   3.00 hours
This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisites: Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   8.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 380 - Business Internship
Credits:   6.00 hours
This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisites: Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   17.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 381 - Business Internship
Credits:   9.00 hours
This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisites: Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   26.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 382 - Business Internship
Credits:   12.00 hours
This upper division course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from BUS 379 and BUS 479 Business Internship II. Prerequisites: Junior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   35.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 400 - Quality Techniques
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers quality tools and techniques used in problem solving and decision making. Topics include: Pareto charts; cause and- effects diagrams; check sheets; histograms; scatter diagrams; quality function deployment; statistical process control; continuous improvement; Goldratt’s theory of constraints; benchmarking; just-in time manufacturing; and implementing total quality. A written assignment will be required that integrates quality topics with problem solving and decision making tools and techniques. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 400.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 240   Minimum Grade: D   or   MTH 110   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 401 - Quality Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers quality philosophies and concepts. Topics include: quality and global competitiveness; human resources and technology; total quality approach; strategic management; quality management and ethics; partnering for competitiveness; quality culture; customer satisfaction and retention; employee empowerment; leadership and change; team building and teamwork; communication and interpersonal relations; education and training; overcoming politics and negativity toward quality in the workplace; relationship of ISO 9000 and Total Quality Management. A written assignment will be required that integrates quality philosophies and concepts with management and human resources issues. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 401.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   IND 301   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 404 - Financial Markets and Institutions
Credits:   3.00 hours
This senior level course describes the various financial markets and the financial institutions that serve those markets. Specific topics include financial intermediaries, primary and secondary financial markets, treasury and agency securities markets, municipal securities markets, financial futures markets, and stock markets in the U.S. and worldwide. Also included are evolving technologies, especially e-Business and the Internet, and their effect on financial markets and institutions. The course contains oral and written case study analyses utilizing electronic database research techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 201   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 201R   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 406 - Business Organization Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the law of agency, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, securities, regulations, bankruptcy, employment and anti-trust laws. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 202   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 409 - Strategic Management
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers key strategic management topics including the "strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats" (SWOT) analysis. Organizations require strategic management processes that encompass planning, formulation, decision-making (implementation), and evaluation of long-term policies. International issues, codes of ethics, and ethical behavioral considerations are prominent components in the strategic management process will also be discussed. Students will be required to present oral and written case studies in class. Students who have previously completed IND 409 cannot receive credit for BUS 409.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   IND 301   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 409W - Strategic Management (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers key strategic management topics including the "strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats" ("SWOT") analysis. Organizations require strategic management processes that encompass planning, formulation decision-making (implementation), and evaluation of long-term policies. International issues, codes of ethics, and ethical behavioral considerations are prominent components in the strategic management process will also be discussed. Students will be required to present oral and written case studies in class. This is a writing-intensive course. Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 409.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   IND 301   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 410 - Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a 45-hour independent study course. Students must obtain permission from a Project Advisor before registering for this course. Although there is some flexibility, most senior projects will involve student participation onsite in a company. The topic for the senior project will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous Management Technology and related courses. Note: Students completing this course may not receive credit for IND 410
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 409   Minimum Grade: D   or   IND 409   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 411 - Financial Statement Analysis
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the main reasons for and techniques used in financial statement analysis. This analysis uses the historical record of companies, as presented in financial statements, to answer questions regarding a firm’s credit worthiness and risk; current and projected financial performance; strengths and weaknesses in financial position; and strategy development for future operations. The course includes analysis tools and techniques such as common size financial statements, trend statements, and financial ratios. Also covered will be sources of financial information embodied in corporate annual reports such as the auditor’s report; footnotes and supplemental schedules; and SEC Forms 10-K and 10-Q.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 201   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 412 - Business, Government and Society
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the interrelationships among business, government, and society. Included also are the ethical, economic, political, and social issues managers face regarding consumers, employees, suppliers, the environment, government laws and regulations, and stockholders. These interrelationships and issues are discussed and analyzed in a managerial context employing stakeholder, historical, and global perspectives. Individual and group case study presentations both in oral and written formats are a major focus of the course. Prerequisite(s): College-level Management course or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management

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BUS 412W - Business, Government and Society (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers the interrelationships among business, government, and society. Included also are the ethical, economic, political, and social issues managers face regarding consumers, employees, suppliers, the environment, government laws and regulations, and stockholders. These interrelationships and issues are discussed and analyzed in a managerial context employing stakeholder, historical, and global perspectives. Individual and group case study presentations both in oral and written formats are a major focus of the course. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite(s) required and College-level Management course or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 413 - Advanced Enterprise Resource Planning
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced-level Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) course includes high-level information technology coverage of Scheduling, Planning, MRP, Logistics, Warehousing, Procurement, Quality, Vendor Management, Cost Accounting, Forecasting, KPI, Supply Chain, and Customer Resource Management. Also covered are concepts and software applications, pertaining to product design, development, manufacturing (production), marketing, sales, and field service. This course emphasizes proficiency in all the skill sets typically required within industry practices.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 300   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 300   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BUS 313   Minimum Grade: D   or   BCS 313   Minimum Grade: D )  

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BUS 421 - Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced corporate financial management course covers topics taken from the Institute of Management Accountants Certified in Financial Management program Part 2CFM examination. Topics covered include working capital policy and management; strategic issues in finance; portfolio and risk management; external financial environment; and employee benefit and pension plans.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 201   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 431 - Managerial and Internal Controls Within The Business Enterprise
Credits:   3.00 hours
This senior level course has a strategic orientation and is intended for future managers with responsibilities in the areas of finance, operations, management, information technology, and financial and managerial accounting. The course objectives focus on the appropriate use of internal controls in effectively managing and controlling processes across the business enterprise. In addition, the importance of both the internal and external audit functions are reviewed in conjunction with management's fiduciary responsibilities to the stakeholders of the enterprise. Specific topics include the overall control environment, corporate culture, business ethics and management's responsibilities for implementing, monitoring and reporting on the adequacy of internal operating controls.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 201   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 450 - American Business History
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course focuses on major problems in American business history covering the period from the early colonial period (mid-1700's) through the present time. Biographical profiles of American leaders in industry and finance are included. The course makes extensive use of online database resources. Current topics such as industrial pollution, "oil shocks", deregulation, e-Commerce, terrorism, and globalization are covered. Students will participate in oral group presentations. Note: This is a BUS-designated course and as such does not satisfy the General Education American History requirement.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 450W - American Business History (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course focuses on major problems in American business history covering the period from the early colonial period (mid-1700's) through the present time. Biographical profiles of American leaders in industry and finance are included. The course makes extensive use of online database resources. Current topics such as industrial pollution, "oil shocks", deregulation, e-commerce, terrorism, and globalization are covered. Students will participate in oral group presentations. Note: This is a BUS designated course and as such does not satisfy the General Education American History requirement. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   or   BUS 211   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 460 - Leadership and Ethics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced-level business management course covers theories, case studies, and skill development applications relating to effective leadership and ethics. Emphasis will be on the interrelated role of laws, cultural norms, attitudes, moral development, situational circumstances, and technologies as determining effects on ethical leadership. Coursework includes leadership-and ethics related research literature and databases. Prerequisite(s) required or Management course, EGL 101, Senior-level standing.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 460W - Leadership and Ethics (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This advanced-level business management course covers theories, case studies, and skill development applications relating to effective leadership and ethics. Emphasis will be on the interrelated role of laws, cultural norms, attitudes, moral development, situational circumstances, and technologies as determining effects on ethical leadership. Coursework includes leadership and ethics related research literature and databases. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 109   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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BUS 470 - Advanced Accounting
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers accounting for partnerships: formation, operation, dissolutions, and liquidation. Also covered are analysis of business combinations; statutory mergers, consolidations, acquisition of subsidiaries, preparation of consolidated financial statements including the equity method and elimination entries. Additionally, the course includes an introduction to foreign currency translation and transactions, the SEC, and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 272   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 471 - Auditing
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers professional ethics and possible legal liability of the auditor. Emphasized are Generally Accepted Standards (GAAS) and other standards related to attestation engagements and skills needed to apply that knowledge in and other attestation engagements; the role of internal control; uses of sampling; effects of information technology the reports rendered by auditors; and the methods for preparing communications to satisfy engagement objectives. Prerequisite(s) required or Department approval.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 272   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 479 - Business Internship II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internships, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s) required or Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   8.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 379   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 480 - Business Internship II
Credits:   6.00 hours
This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s) required or Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   17.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 379   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 481 - Business Internship II
Credits:   9.00 hours
This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite(s) required or Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   26.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 379   Minimum Grade: D

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BUS 482 - Business Internship II
Credits:   12.00 hours
This senior-level course is designed to give students who have completed BUS 379 an opportunity to continue to gain in-depth work experience and skills under the tutelage of a business professional. The work done by the student is guided by objectives agreed to by the work supervisor, Internship Coordinator, and the student. Students are required to submit a written proposal, progress reports in the form of a weekly work experience journal, and a final report to be presented to the Internship Coordinator and work supervisor. Note: No more than 15 credits may be earned in total from Business Internship, BUS 379 and BUS 479. Prerequisite required or Senior-level standing, Department approval, GPA of 3.0 or better
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   35.00 hours
College:   Business
Department:   Business Management
Pre-requisites:   BUS 379   Minimum Grade: D

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Chinese

CHI 151 - Chinese I
Credits:   3.00 hours
A beginning course in Chinese emphasizing the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness. (3,0) Credits: 3
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages

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CHI 152 - Chinese II
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of Chinese 151. This course emphasizes the gradual development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative and cultural awareness. Prerequisite(s) CHI 151 or 2-3 years of high school Chinese. (3,0) Credits: 3
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Modern Languages
Pre-requisites:   CHI 151   Minimum Grade: D

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Chemistry

CHM 111 - Chemistry and the Public Interest
Credits:   3.00 hours
An abridged course in General Chemistry which presents the ideas and methods of chemical science in a qualitative and conceptual fashion. This course assumes no previous science background and will emphasize the fundamentals of measurement, atomic theory, bonding, solutions, acids and bases, salts, equations, chemical arithmetic and energy transfer. Illustrations and applications of concepts will be drawn from everyday life. (This course is intended to fulfill the science requirements of non-science majors and is NOT OPEN to science, health science, or pre-health majors). Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry

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CHM 112 - Chemistry and the Public Interest (Lab)
Credits:   1.00 hour
A one semester laboratory course for non-science majors designed to provide students with experience in the methods of chemistry. Students will investigate the properties of substances, perform chemical analysis and substance identification, synthesize a drug and a natural product, and test manufacturers' claims for consumer products. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 111

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CHM 112L - Chemistry and Public Interest Lab
Credits:   1.00 hour
A one semester laboratory course for non-science majors designed to provide students with experience in the methods of chemistry. Students will investigate the properties of substances, perform chemical analysis and substance identification, synthesize a drug and a natural product, and test manufacturers' claims for consumer products. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry

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CHM 124 - Principles of Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester survey of general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on quantitative applications of chemical concepts. Topics include: measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical stoichiometry, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium and kinetics. This course will fulfill the requirement of certain science, health science, or pre-health programs that have an introductory chemistry course as a prerequisite. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 124L

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CHM 124L - Principles of Chemistry (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A one semester survey of general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on quantitative applications of chemical concepts. Topics include: measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical stoichiometry, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrum and kinetics. THIS COURSE WILL FULFILL THE REQUIREMENT OF CERTAIN SCIENCE, HEALTH SCIENCE, OR PRE-HEALTH PROGRAMS THAT HAVE AN INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY COURSE AS A PREREQUISITE.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 124T

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CHM 124T - Principles of Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester survey of general chemistry. Emphasis is placed on quantitative applications of chemical concepts. Topics include: measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical stoichiometry, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrum and kinetics. THIS COURSE WILL FULFILL THE REQUIREMENT OF CERTAIN SCIENCE, HEALTH SCIENCE, OR PRE-HEALTH PROGRAMS THAT HAVE AN INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY COURSE AS A PREREQUISITE.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 124L

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CHM 140 - Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course with laboratory designed primarily for Dental Hygiene students. Basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry are presented with emphasis on their applications to health science. Topics include measurement, states of matter, bonding theory, solutions, acids, buffers and pH, and the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, sterols, amino acids and proteins and a molecular approach to enzymatic action, digestion, metabolism and nutrition. Prerequisite(s) required or High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1 and High School Chemistry with Laboratory.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 140L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Chemistr   065  

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CHM 140L - Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A one semester course with laboratory designed primarily for Dental Hygiene students. Basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry are presented with emphasis on their applications to health science. Topics include measurement, states of matter, bonding theory, solutions, acids, buffers and pH, and the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, sterols, amino acids and proteins and a molecular approach to enzymatic action, digestion, metabolism and nutrition. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1 and High School chemistry with Laboratory or CHM 124. (3,2) 4 credits.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 140T

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CHM 140T - Introduction to General, Organic and Biochemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course with laboratory designed primarily for Dental Hygiene students. Basic principles of general, organic and biochemistry are presented with emphasis on their applications to health science. Topics include measurement, states of matter, bonding theory, solutions, acids, buffers and pH, and the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, sterols, amino acids and proteins and a molecular approach to enzymatic action, digestion, metabolism and nutrition. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1 and High School chemistry with Laboratory or CHM 124. (3,2) 4 credits.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 140L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124R   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Chemistr   065  

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CHM 152 - General Chemistry Principles I
Credits:   4.00 hours
The first part of a two semester sequence in General Chemistry Principles with laboratory. This course covers the qualitative and quantitative aspects of scientific measurement, the nature of matter, gases, liquids and solids, energy, atomic theory, properties of elements, chemical bonding, molecular structure and properties, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and solutions. Prerequisite(s): High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 2 required. Corequisite(s): CHM 152L (3,2) Credits: 4
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 152L

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CHM 152L - General Chemistry I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The first part of a two semester sequence in General Chemistry Principles with laboratory. This course covers the qualitative and quantitative aspects of scientific measurement, the nature of matter, gases, liquids and solids, energy, atomic theory, properties of elements, chemical bonding, molecular structure and properties, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and solutions.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 152T

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CHM 152T - General Chemistry Principles I
Credits:   4.00 hours
The first part of a two semester sequence in General Chemistry Principles with laboratory. This course covers the qualitative and quantitative aspects of scientific measurement, the nature of matter, gases, liquids and solids, energy, atomic theory, properties of elements, chemical bonding, molecular structure and properties, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and solutions.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 152L

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CHM 153 - General Chemistry Principles II
Credits:   4.00 hours
A continuation of General Chemistry Principles I, which includes laboratory. Topics include: solutions and their colligative properties, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, pH, buffers, titration curves, oxidation and reduction balancing, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, the covalent bond and the shape of molecules.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 153L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 152   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 153L - General Chemistry II (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A continuation of General Chemistry Principles I, which includes laboratory. Topics include: solutions and their colligative properties, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, pH, buffers, titration curves, oxidation and reduction balancing, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, the covalent bond and the shape of molecules.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 153T

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CHM 153T - General Chemistry Principles II
Credits:   4.00 hours
A continuation of General Chemistry Principles I, which includes laboratory. Topics include: solutions and their colligative properties, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, pH, buffers, titration curves, oxidation and reduction balancing, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, the covalent bond and the shape of molecules.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 153L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 152   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152R   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152T   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 260 - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course in organic chemistry designed to provide background in the fundamentals of nomenclature, mechanisms, structures, and synthesis of carbon based compounds. This course is designed for science and health science majors who desire a general rather than a detailed knowledge of the compounds of carbon. Topics to be covered include: structure and bonding, acid/base chemistry, isomerism, stereochemistry, and structure determination. Functional groups to be covered include: hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives and amines. Laboratory work will include common organic techniques and experiments supporting the principles covered in lecture. Prerequisite(s): CHM 124 Corequisite(s): CHM 260L (3,3) Credits: 4
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 260L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153T   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 260L - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A one semester course in organic chemistry designed to provide background in the fundamentals of nomenclature, mechanisms, structures, and synthesis of carbon based compounds. This course is designed for science and health science majors who desire a general rather than a detailed knowledge of the compounds of carbon. Topics to be covered include: structure and bonding, acid/base chemistry, isomerism, stereochemistry, and structure determination. Functional groups to be covered include: hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives and amines. Laboratory work will include common organic techniques and experiments supporting the principles covered in lecture.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 260T

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CHM 260T - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course in organic chemistry designed to provide background in the fundamentals of nomenclature, mechanisms, structures, and synthesis of carbon based compounds. This course is designed for science and health science majors who desire a general rather than a detailed knowledge of the compounds of carbon. Topics to be covered include: structure and bonding, acid/base chemistry, isomerism, stereochemistry, and structure determination. Functional groups to be covered include: hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives and amines. Laboratory work will include common organic techniques and experiments supporting the principles covered in lecture.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 260L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153T   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 270 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits:   5.00 hours
A study of the compounds of carbon involving a thorough integration of observation and theory and emphasizing the relationships between structures, properties, mechanisms and reactions. This course, intended for science and pre-professional majors, covers topics such as bonding and structure, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloaliphatic hydrocarbons stereochemistry, dienes, benzene, electrophilic aeromatic substitution, arenes, spectroscopy and structure determination and includes laboratory.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 270L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 153   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 270L - Organic Chemistry I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A study of the compounds of carbon involving a thorough integration of observation and theory and emphasizing the relationships between structures, properties, mechanisms and reactions. This course, intended for science and pre-professional majors, covers topics such as bonding and structure, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloaliphatic hydrocarbons stereochemistry, dienes, benzene, electrophilic aeromatic substitution, arenes, spectroscopy and structure determination and includes laboratory.
Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 270T

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CHM 270T - Organic Chemistry I
Credits:   5.00 hours
A study of the compounds of carbon involving a thorough integration of observation and theory and emphasizing the relationships between structures, properties, mechanisms and reactions. This course, intended for science and pre-professional majors, covers topics such as bonding and structure, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cycloaliphatic hydrocarbons stereochemistry, dienes, benzene, electrophilic aeromatic substitution, arenes, spectroscopy and structure determination and includes laboratory.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   0.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 270L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 153   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153R   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 153T   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 271 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits:   5.00 hours
A continuation of CHM 270. Topics covered include: alkyl and aryl halides, alcohols and phenols, ethers and epoxides, carboxylic acids, esters, anhydrides, aldehydes, ketones, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates, heterocycles and polymers.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 271L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 270   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 271L - Organic Chemistry II (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   4.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 271T

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CHM 271T - Organic Chemistry II
Credits:   5.00 hours
A continuation of CHM 270. Topics covered include: alkyl and aryl halides, alcohols and phenols, ethers and epoxides, carboxylic acids, esters, anhydrides, aldehydes, ketones, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates, heterocycles and polymers.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 271L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 270   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 270T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 270C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 270R   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 285 - Physiological Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course consists of the discussion of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism, chemistry of liver, kidney and respiratory functions, role of enzymes, vitamins and hormones, monitoring of therapeutic drugs, and drug interactions and toxicities. The laboratory experience focuses on methodologies and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Prerequisite(s) required or High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 1 and High School Chemistry with Laboratory.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 285L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   and   BIO 170   Minimum Grade: D   and   BIO 171   Minimum Grade: D   or   Regents Examination - Chemistr   065  

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CHM 285L - Physiological Chemistry (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course consists of the discussion of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism, chemistry of liver, kidney and respiratory functions, role of enzymes, vitamins and hormones, monitoring of therapeutic drugs, and drug interactions and toxicities. The laboratory experience focuses on methodologies and interpretation of diagnostic tests.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 285T

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CHM 285T - Physiological Chemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course consists of the discussion of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism, chemistry of liver, kidney and respiratory functions, role of enzymes, vitamins and hormones, monitoring of therapeutic drugs, and drug interactions and toxicities. The laboratory experience focuses on methodologies and interpretation of diagnostic tests.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 285L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 124   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124R   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 124T   Minimum Grade: D   and   ( BIO 170   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 170R   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 170T   Minimum Grade: D )     and   ( BIO 171   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 171C   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 171R   Minimum Grade: D   or   BIO 171T   Minimum Grade: D )     or   Regents Examination - Chemistr   065  

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CHM 324 - Introduction to the Chemistry of Materials
Credits:   4.00 hours
An introductory course designed to study the chemistry of materials. Topics include semiconductors, corrosion, introduction to organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, polymeric substances, ceramics, and composite materials. Prerequisite(s) required or High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 2, one year of college Physics.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 324L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 152   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 324L - Introduction to Chemistry Materials (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 324
Pre-requisites:   CHM 152   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152C   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152R   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 152T   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 324T - Intro: Chemistry of Materials
Credits:   4.00 hours
An introductory course designed to study the chemistry of materials. Topics include semiconductors, corrosion, introduction to organic chemistry, polymer chemistry, polymeric substances, ceramics, and composite materials. Prerequisite(s) required or High School Sequential (Integrated) Math 2, one year of college Physics.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 324L

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CHM 380 - Biochemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course covering the fundamentals of bio- chemistry. Topics covered include: the structure and function of important biomolecules such as carbohydrates lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics and the use of cofactors and coenzymes; and metabolic pathways including glycolysis, TCA, electron- transport system, fatty acid and amino acid pathways. Laboratory work includes current biochemical laboratory techniques such as chromatography and electrophoresis, application of specific topics described above, and analysis of data from laboratory experiments.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   CHM 380L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 260   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 160   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 260T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 271   Minimum Grade: D

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CHM 380L - Biochemistry (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
A one semester course covering the fundmentals of bio- chemistry. Topics covered include: the structure and function of important biomolecules such as carbohydrates lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics and the use of cofactors & coenzymes; and metabolic pathways including glycolysis, TCA, electron- transport system, fatty acid and amino acid pathways. Laboratory work includes current biochemical laboratory techniques such as chromatography and electrophoresis, application of specific topics described above, and analysis of data from laboratory experiments.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Chemistry
Co-Requisites:   CHM 380T

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CHM 380T - Biochemistry
Credits:   4.00 hours
A one semester course covering the fundmentals of bio- chemistry. Topics covered include: the structure and function of important biomolecules such as carbohydrates lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics and the use of cofactors & coenzymes; and metabolic pathways including glycolysis, TCA, electron- transport system, fatty acid and amino acid pathways. Laboratory work includes current biochemical laboratory techniques such as chromatography and electrophoresis, application of specific topics described above, and analysis of data from laboratory experiments.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Biology
Co-Requisites:   CHM 380L
Pre-requisites:   CHM 260   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 160   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 260T   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 271   Minimum Grade: D   or   CHM 271T   Minimum Grade: D

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Construction/Architectural

CON 101 - Introduction to Technology and Applied Programming
Credits:   2.00 hours
A survey of technological concepts, terminology and a brief review of mathematical concepts. This course introduces concepts of vector and its applications. It introduces hands-on programming and its applications, and reviews problem-solving techniques with technological applications.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 103 - Surveying
Credits:   3.00 hours
The development of skills in the use of the basic surveying instruments tape, level, transit. Trigonometric and differential leveling and cross-sectioning. Azimuth, bearing and angle determination by repetition procedures. Angular closures. Stadia and stadia reduction of inclined sights, topographic mapping by transit stadia and plan table methods.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 103L
Pre-requisites:   CON 101   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 103L - Surveying (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The development of skills in the use of the basic surveying instruments- tape, level, transit. Trigonometric and differential leveling and cross-sectioning. Azimuth, bearing and angle determination by repetition procedures. Angular closures. Stadia and stadia reduction of inclined sights, topographic mapping by transit stadia and plan table methods.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 103T

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CON 103T - Surveying
Credits:   3.00 hours
The development of skills in the use of the basic surveying instruments- tape, level, transit. Trigonometric and differential leveling and cross-sectioning. Azimuth, bearing and angle determination by repetition procedures. Angular closures. Stadia and stadia reduction of inclined sights, topographic mapping by transit stadia and plan table methods.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 103L
Pre-requisites:   CON 101   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 106 - Statics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a basic course in Statics. The main objective of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of statics. Topics such as resultant of a force, equilibrium of forces, moments, couples, analysis of simple trusses, centroids, center of gravity, moments of inertia and friction are covered in this course. Note: Students completing this course cannot also receive credit for MET 201.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   MTH 129   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 111 - Graphics I
Credits:   2.00 hours
To develop student's abilities in lettering, technical sketching, drafting and the use of drafting instruments. The fundamentals of orthographic projection and pictorial drawings develop the student's abilities to visualize and describe objects and structures graphically.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 121 - Graphics II
Credits:   2.00 hours
To continue the development of the graphic skills from Graphics I to include one and two point perspective drawing and the introduction of descriptive geometry. Also included is an extensive use of computer-aided drawing on AutoCad.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 111   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 161 - Materials and Methods of Construction I
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the engineering properties and the uses of construction materials including soils, concrete, masonry, steel and wood. Classroom testing demonstrations of several materials are included. Conventional construction systems are studied. The student is also given an orientation to the construction industry, the associated professions, and the varieties of employment available.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 161W - Materials and Methods of Construction I (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction to the engineering properties and the uses of construction materials including soils, concrete, masonry, steel and wood. Classroom testing demonstrations of several materials are included. Conventional construction systems are studied. The student is also given an orientation to the construction industry, the associated professions, and the varieties of employment available. Note: Students will be expected to write short exercises, as well as longer papers that will be revised and graded. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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CON 162 - Materials and Methods of Construction II
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of CON 161 extended to include the study of architectural properties of selected materials, methods of construction, and building components. Class work includes technical problem solving using quantitative and graphic analysis of specific building construction systems.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 161   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 164 - Applications of Programming
Credits:   0.00 or 2.00 hours
The use of commercially prepared programs in surveying and technology as well as the actual writing and execution of programs for the programmable calculator, extensive hands-on experience is emphasized.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 207 - Elements of Strength of Materials
Credits:   3.00 hours
Introduces to the concepts of stress, strain, bending and shear stresses, including elasticity, shear and moment diagrams for beams, moment of inertia of unsymmetrical sections, thermal and combined stresses. Laboratory demonstration of experiments and testing equipment are included.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 106   Minimum Grade: D   or   MET 201   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 221 - Introductory Structures
Credits:   2.00 hours
An overview and introduction to structures and their use in buildings. Systematic treatment of all the major structural elements used mainly in a building context. Discussion of design principle. Includes steel, concrete, and timber design. Computer application included.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 251 - Architectural Design I
Credits:   0.00 or 3.00 hours
Drafting standards, techniques and creative design principles related to the field of architecture. Freehand drawing design problems with the development of research notes, preliminary studies and architectural presentation drawings.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 256 - Construction Estimating
Credits:   0.00 or 2.00 hours
Development of a systematic procedure to take off quantities from working drawings for a typical project. Current wage rates and material costs, percentages, proportions and square foot methods of estimating from the point of view of the general contractor. Methods of estimating accurately during early stages of project design are covered in detail.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 261 - Energy in Buildings
Credits:   0.00 or 2.00 hours
Basic treatment of energy flow in buildings and survey of contemporary systems for comfort conditioning of interior spaces. Utilization of energy for lighting and mechanical equipment is also covered. Emphasis is placed on methods of conservation and utilization of alternate renewable energy resources particularly passive and active solar heating and cooling methods. Programming applications in passive solar design are studied.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 264 - Highway Construction Materials
Credits:   0.00 or 2.00 hours
Properties of basic materials used in highway and bridge construction in depth. The materials to be studied are soils, aggregates, concrete, steel, and asphalt. The physical parameters which contribute to material performance are studied in detail. Quality control procedures and construction methods required for successful use of materials are presented.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 265 - Highway Design
Credits:   0.00 or 2.00 hours
Preparation of construction drawings for the rehabilitation of an existing roadway and for the construction of a road through an undeveloped area. In addition, students will perform an accident survey of existing intersection and develop construction drawings for its rehabilitation. Development of typical cross-sections, horizontal alignment, vertical grade design, quantity take-offs, safety standards and specifications are studied while accomplishing the three above mentioned projects.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 271 - Construction Working Drawings
Credits:   2.00 hours
The development of construction working drawings resolving typical technical problems in concrete, masonry, steel and wood construction. Concepts learned in Materials and Methods of Construction I and II are applied to specific drawing assignments. A residential type 5 frame construction, and a commercial, type 2 non-combustible or type 4 ordinary construction, building project will be advanced resulting in a set of construction drawings.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 299 - Construction/Architecture Internship
Credits:   3.00 hours
A program of practical experience and independent study to supplement and enrich classroom learning. It is a fully faculty supervised structured industrial experience. Periodical written reports and end of the assignment employer report required. Prerequisite(s): 3rd Semester Standing, and Department Chair approval
Lecture:   0.00 hours Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Construction-Archit.Engr.Tech.
Construction Management Tech.
Must be enrolled in one of the following Class(es):
Second Semester Junior
Second Semester Senior
Second Semester Sophomore
First Semester Senior
First Semester Junior
First Semester Sophomore

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CON 301 - Construction Methods and Equipment
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers methods and equipment used in heavy, commercial and residential construction. It includes earth-moving excavating, loading and hauling, rock excavation, compressed air and water systems, paving, and some selected topics from building construction.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 302 - Soils, Foundations and Earth Structure
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces soil mechanics, foundation and earth structure to the engineering technology students. It includes soil classification, soil properties, soil stresses, earth pressures, bearing capacity, slope stability. It also discusses principles of foundation analysis and design, retaining walls, etc. Laboratory experiments to test behavior of soils included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 302L
Pre-requisites:   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 302L - Soils, Foundations and Earth Structure (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course introduces soil mechanics, foundation and earth structure to the engineering technology students. It includes soil classification, soil properties, soil stresses, earth pressures, bearing capacity, slope stability. It also discusses principles of foundation analysis and design, retaining walls, etc. Laboratory experiments to test behavior of soils included.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 302T

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CON 302T - Soils, Foundations and Earth Structure
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces soil mechanics, foundation and earth structure to the engineering technology students. It includes soil classification, soil properties, soil stresses, earth pressures, bearing capacity, slope stability. It also discusses principles of foundation analysis and design, retaining walls, etc. Laboratory experiments to test behavior of soils included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 302L
Pre-requisites:   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 303 - Hydraulics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a broad understanding of the basic principles of engineering hydraulics and hydrology. The emphasis is on application of the theories. It involves basic principle of hydraulics, and flow in closed conduits, flow in open channels, hydraulic structures, principles of hydrology, groundwater hydraulics, and related laboratory experiments. Computer application included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 303L
Pre-requisites:   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D   and   PHY 136   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 303L - Hydraulics (Laboratory)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 303T

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CON 303T - Hydraulics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides a broad understanding of the basic principles of engineering hydraulics and hydrology. The emphasis is on application of the theories. It involves basic principle of hydraulics, flow in closed conduits, flow in open channels, hydraulic structures, principles of hydrology, groundwater hydraulics, and related laboratory experiments. Computer application included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 303L
Pre-requisites:   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D   and   PHY 136   Minimum Grade: D   or   PHY 136T   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 350 - Introduction to Construction Engineering
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces construction engineering principles and methods and equipment used in heavy and commercial construction. It includes earthmoving excavating, loading and hauling, rock excavation, compressed air and water systems, tunneling, and some selected topics from building construction.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D   and   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 357 - Quantity Surveying and Costing
Credits:   3.00 hours
CON 357 Quantity Surveying and Costing (3 credits). This course focuses on fundamentals of quantity survey and costing of residential and commercial facilities. Quantification of materials from construction drawings is covered in this course. Topics also covered range from site work, forms, concrete, metals and masonry, plumbing and electrical to wood framing and steel framing. The course also introduces fundamentals of computer assisted estimating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 361 - Government Building, Environmental Codes and Regulations
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course studies the concepts in preparation of an environmental impact statement. It also reviews state and local building and land use controls. Attention will be given to governmental regulations required to obtain building permits for particular construction projects.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 365 - Highway Design and Construction
Credits:   3.00 hours
Design criteria for roadways including arterial signalization speed considerations, visual constraints and reaction criteria. Superelevation and spiral curve criteria. Construction quantification, haul considerations and mass curve analysis. Traffic considerations, destination surveys and road saturation criteria. Intersection analysis, striping, signage and lighting. Barriers, types and design considerations. Economic analysis and environmental constraints. Appurtenant structure consideration such as drains, curbing, curb cuts and ramps. Pavement stability.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 303   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 366 - Flood Protective Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces Floodplain Management and National Flood Insurance program. It addresses the requirements for new construction in riverine and coastal flood prone areas. It also introduces various retrofitting alternatives and design of Flood Protective Structure. It uses extensively standards and manuals developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 399 - Applied Research Topics
Credits:   3.00 hours
A program of applied research and independent study on topics a faculty member is currently working on. This course is meant to enrich the learning experience by introducing the student to methods and analysis in applied research. This is a fully faculty directed and supervised structured research experience. Applied research work will be presented in an appropriate forum. Prerequisite(s): Associate degree in Construction Technology or third year standing in a Construction Technology program.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Other:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 401 - Construction Project Management and Scheduling
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course gives an in-depth introduction and orientation to construction project management. This includes professional construction management in practice and methods in professional construction management. Some of the areas this course will cover are: Bidding and Award, Application of Controls, Scheduling, Planning Quality Assurance, Safety and Health in Construction, Industrial Relations. Computer Applications included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 401W - Construction Project Management and Scheduling (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course gives an in-depth introduction and orientation to construction project management. This includes professional construction management in practice and methods in professional construction management. Some of the areas this course will cover are: Bidding and Award, Application of Controls, Scheduling, Planning and Control of Operations and Resources, Procurement Quality Assurance, Safety and Health in Construction, Industrial Relations. Computer Applications included. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D   and   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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CON 402 - Civil Engineering Materials
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers a study of the materials used for Civil Engineering construction purposes. The materials to be studied are concrete, steel, asphalt and wood. The physical parameters which contribute to material performance are studied. Appropriate laboratory tests are included. Documents from the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Testing material will be used.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 402L
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 402L - Civil Engineering Materials (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course covers a study of the materials used for Civil Engineering construction purposes. The materials to be studied are concrete, steel, asphalt and wood. The physical parameters which contribute to material performance are studied. Appropriate laboratory tests are included. Documents from the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Testing material will be used.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 402T
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 402T - Civil Engineering Materials
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course covers a study of the materials used for Civil Engineering construction purposes. The materials to be studied are concrete, steel, asphalt and wood. The physical parameters which contribute to material performance are studied. Appropriate laboratory tests are included. Documents from the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Testing material will be used.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Co-Requisites:   CON 402L
Pre-requisites:   CON 162   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 403 - Structures I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces fundamentals of structural analysis for beams, trusses, frames, etc. It includes statically determinate as well as indeterminate structures. This course also introduces fundamentals of reinforced concrete design including strength design for beams, columns, footings, and two way slabs. Computer application included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 207   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 404 - Structures II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces fundamentals of structural steel design. This includes design of tension members, compression members, beams, columns, and various connections. This course also teaches the basic principles of wood design, which includes formwork design and frame construction. Computer application is included.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Construction Mgmt. Engr. Tech.
Construction Management Tech.
Pre-requisites:   CON 403   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 405 - Advanced Estimating
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course attempts to give the students a broader perspective based on the various roles an estimator may play that requires preparation or interpretation of cost data. It provides an understanding of the importance of accurate estimating in controlling project cost and in determining project budgets. It includes references and examples that cover the wide range of project types. It also covers present computer technology in the field of estimating.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Restrictions:  
May not be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Construction Management Tech.
Pre-requisites:   CON 256   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 406 - Advanced Project Planning and Scheduling
Credits:   3.00 hours
CON 406 Advanced Project Planning and Scheduling. Topics include introduction to advanced project planning concepts and terminology, development of schedule activities and preparing and maintaining computerized schedules. Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM).
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   CON 401W   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 407 - Building Commissioning
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course provides various aspects of Building Commissioning process that includes verifying all the subsystems of a building such as HVAC, plumbing, electrical, fire/life safety, building envelopes, lighting etc. Students will develop an understanding of the relationships between new construction and LEED Building Commissioning credits. Laboratory tests on start up and optimization of energy uses of HVAC, Electrical and Plumbing components are included.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Pre-requisites:   ARC 263   Minimum Grade: D

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CON 496 - Capstone Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a capstone course. It utilizes skills and knowledge acquired in various courses in the curriculum and general education courses to produce a real life project. In this course, students follow a faculty driven structured process to integrate various components of a project. This course introduces very little new material, rather it helps the student to synthesize skills and knowledge learned in other courses to apply in real-life situations. Prerequisite(s): Department Approval, Upper Division Status and substantial completion of the program.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 497 - Senior Project I
Credits:   1.00 hour
Part I of a two part capstone course. Involves writing the proposal and researching background for Part II of Senior Project CON 498. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 498 - Senior Project II
Credits:   2.00 hours
Part II of two part capstone course. Involves investigation of proposed problem, including test, analysis, design, etc. along with formal report and presentation to senior project faculty committee. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor.
Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr

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CON 499 - Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a capstone course. It will utilize skills and knowledge acquired in various curriculum and non curriculum courses to solve a real life construction problem. It will involve an independent investigation of a technical problem of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as Project Advisor.
Lecture:   0.00 or 1.00 hours Lab:   0.00 or 4.00 hours
College:   Engineering Technologies
Department:   Construction/Architect Engr
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Construction Management Tech.

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Criminal Justice

CRJ 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
Credits:   3.00 hours
Philosophical and historical background of policing throughout the free world; special emphasis is placed on the heritage of British and American policing, the governmental role of law enforcement in society; administration of American justice at all levels of government. The role of technology in law enforcement and crime prevention; history, modes and impact.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 101 - Law Enforcement and Community Relations
Credits:   3.00 hours
Emphasis will be placed on the numerous and complex factors involved in the areas of human relations as they affect law enforcement. An examination of prejudices, myths, and discrimination, how to control them, and their impact in law enforcement. The use of information management tools for classifying cases with respect to issues of bias.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 102 - Juvenile Delinquency
Credits:   3.00 hours
An introduction and an orientation to the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency; and examination of the methods of handling juvenile offenders, including interviewing techniques, screening, and referrals to social agencies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 103 - Organized Crime
Credits:   3.00 hours
The historic roots of organized crime; the casual factors of organized crime in American society; the activities, organization and economics of organized crime; the problems of corruption and graft; and the development of strategies to control the activities of organized crime.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 105 - Corrections in America
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will discuss the history of the US correctional systems as a series of penal reforms. It will also explore the theoretical principles and critiques that direct and influence correctional policies and practices, past and present. In addition, it will investigate the populations and operations of various correctional institutions and programs: inmates and offices, jails, prisons, and community forms of correction. It will further assess the problems and challenges of current correctional practices: aging populations, mental illness, and HIV/AIDS. Moreover, it will consider the future of corrections in the context of what has been called "a culture of control".
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 115 - Computer Forensics
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is an orientation to the study of computer forensic methods. The course will include an analysis of computer hardware that is utilized in forensic investigations such as motherboards, BIOS settings, hard and floppy disk drives and controllers, SCSI controllers and drives and implementations, RAID controllers, boot sequences and related components. Also, this course will introduce the student to methods used in analyzing data storage devices and will include an examination of the physical structures, surfaces and formats of hard disks and other media.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Restrictions:  
May not be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Computer Programming/Info Sys

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CRJ 200 - Criminal Investigation
Credits:   3.00 hours
Introduction to criminal investigation, technical methods used at the crime scene; development of clues, identification of suspects; criminal investigation procedures including the theory of an investigation; conduct at crime scenes; collection and preservation of physical evidence, analysis of the elements that constitute all crimes. Includes use of profile analysis and modus operandi databases in criminal investigation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 200W - Criminal Investigation (Writing Intensive)
Credits:   3.00 hours
Introduction to criminal investigation, technical methods used at the crime scene; development of clues, identification of suspects, criminal investigation procedures including the theory of an investigation, conduct at crime scenes; collection and preservation of physical evidence, analysis of the elements that constitute all crimes. This is a writing-intensive course.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C

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CRJ 201 - Criminalistics
Credits:   3.00 hours
The role of the Crime Laboratory in the law enforcement organization; scope of a criminalistic operation; organizational orientation of the criminalistics laboratory. Reconstruction of the crime scene through computer animation methods.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 203 - Criminology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces anthropological, biological and economical, ecological, philosophical, psychological, psychiatric and sociological theories of criminal behavior as well as research evidence on the basic patterns of crime and crime trends. Computer-based data analysis of index crimes selected from the Uniform Crime Reports compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Crime Victimization Survey.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 204 - Criminal Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
Elements and proof of frequent concern in law enforcement, with reference to principal rules of criminal liability. Importance of criminal law at the enforcement levels is considered from crime prevention to courtroom appearance. Particular emphasis will be placed on the New York State Penal Law. Case analysis method is employed to study case precedents. Computer software for rapid information retrieval will be introduced.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 205 - Criminal Procedure Law
Credits:   3.00 hours
Rules of evidence of particular importance at the operational level in law enforcement with emphasis on criminal procedure in areas such as arrest, force, and search and seizure. Particular emphasis will be placed on the New York State Criminal Procedure Law. The use of case tracking tools within prosecution and court units and systems; the use of case outcome analytical techniques to determine trends in practice and effectiveness.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 211 - Law Enforcement Administration
Credits:   3.00 hours
Principles of organization and management in law enforcement and public safety. Analysis of the major problems in police organization and administration. Developing, maintaining and using complex and multiple information systems for crime trends as well as internal organizational operations; use of management control systems and associated computer information analysis and simulation tools for police patrol planning and evaluation. Examination of the role of technology in the police crime prevention function.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 217 - Computer Forensics II
Credits:   3.00 hours
Computer Forensics II is a continuation of CRJ 115. This course covers topics such as disk geometry and organization. Master boot sector record and volume record creation and organization, file signatures for data type identification, cyclic redundancy checksum for data integrity validation, and RSA's MD5 hash values for file authentication. Other subjects introduced include the UNIX "grep" search utility, search string techniques and file signature matching, and recovery of files that are intentionally deleted, hidden, or renamed. The course examines advanced computer-based evidentiary and "discovery" data methodologies, and includes a study of evidence identification, documentation, and chain of custody procedures.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 218 - Computer Forensics III
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course examines federal, state, and local computer fraud statutes to provide the student with a legal foundation to approach computer investigations. The course includes lecture elements that provide the student with the skills necessary to conduct successful computer-related investigations, and includes an examination of the processes involved in preparing an affidavit for a search warrant.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 217   Minimum Grade: D   or   CRJ 215   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 230 - Biometrics and Identity Theft
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will introduce the history of biometrics, physiological/anatomical biometrics (fingerprint, iris, face hand geometry, DNA, ear, vascular, etc), behavioral biometrics (speech/voice, signature, gait, keyboard typing, human biosignal, etc), biometric sensor technology and anti-spoofing, and soft biometrics. Students will learn how each biometric works, and how and why different biometrics should be chosen for different applications, such as online banking, surveillance and transportation security. It also covers the security and privacy issue of biometrics. The course will provide students with an understanding of the nature and scope of Identity Theft and Computer-Related Fraud.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 300 - Forensic Psychology
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces the student to the study of forensic psychology, a discipline that applies psychology to the law and the criminal justice system. Topics to be covered include: the psychologist's role in the criminal courts, ethical dilemmas of psychologists working in the criminal justice system, psychological perspectives on the nature of criminality and the investigation of crime, criminal profiling, the effects of psychological empirical research on the outcome of criminal trials, and the psychology of the police, witnesses, offenders, and victims. Other new research topics in the field, such as the use of brain fingerprinting technology to determine criminal culpability will also be explored. Students completing this course cannot receive credit for PSY 300.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 100   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 302 - Managing Security Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course introduces students to loss control theory with an analysis of threat models to develop comprehensive protection plans for organizations. The course provides the theoretical foundation for the more advanced segments of the Security Systems program, with a study of the theory, design, programming, management, and operations of security systems. The computer as an integrating technology is emphasized to achieve effectiveness, as well as efficiency, of protection performance.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 304 - Intrusion Detection Systems
Credits:   3.00 hours
This combined lecture and lab course focuses on the role of intrusion detection systems in an organization's overall protection plan, from the control of violence in the work place to preventing theft of company property. Sensor technologies, controls and signaling systems as well as computer Integrated system design are analyzed and evaluated, with applications in the following areas: perimeter, interior, occupant and object protection. Additional topics include a study of Underwriters Laboratory standards and extents of protection.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 307 - Criminal Justice Data Base Operations
Credits:   4.00 hours
The course introduces students to the meaning and structure of criminal justice data, the design of and security for criminal, legal and classified databases, the management of competing information security and confidentiality concerns, and the rights to access criminal justice records on the part of the public, corporate interests and the media. The course examines criminal justice data collection throughout the legal lifecycle (complaint, arrest, prosecution, court, corrections, probation and parole); understanding all through the prism of authenticity, value, timeliness, accountability, integration and prevention.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 307L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 307L - Criminal Justice Data Base Operations (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The course introduces students to the meaning and structure of criminal justice data, the design of and security for criminal, legal and classified databases, the management of competing information security and confidentaility concerns, and the rights to access criminal justice records on the part of the public, corporate interests and the media. The course examines criminal justice data collection throughout the legal lifecycle (complaint, arrest, prosecution, court, corrections, probation and parole); understanding all through the prism of authenticity, value, timeliness, accountability, integration and prevention.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 307T

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CRJ 307T - Criminal Justice Data Base Operations
Credits:   4.00 hours
The course introduces students to the meaning and structure of criminal justice data, the design of and security for criminal, legal and classified databases, the management of competing information security and confidentaility concerns, and the rights to access criminal justice records on the part of the public, corporate interests and the media. The course examines criminal justice data collection throughout the legal lifecycle (complaint, arrest, prosecution, court, corrections, probation and parole); understanding all through the prism of authenticity, value, timeliness, accountability, integration and prevention.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 307L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 308 - Forensic Technology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The course will introduce the student to photographic and video equipment and methods that are used for crime scene documentation and police surveillance operations, including forensic imaging analysis. The course will include a study of camera design and operation, lens selection and functions, role of light and illumination technologies, digital image editing software, and a review of the chain of custody procedures in recording and archiving images for courtroom presentation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 308L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 201   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 308L - Forensic Technology (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The course will introduce the student to photographic and video equipment and methods that are used for crime scene documentation and police surveillance operations, including forensic imaging analysis. The course will include a study of camera design and operation, lens selection and functions, role of light and illumination technologies, digital image editing software, and a review of the chain of custody procedures in recording and archiving images for courtroom presentation.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 308T

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CRJ 308T - Forensic Technology
Credits:   4.00 hours
The course will introduce the student to photographic and video equipment and methods that are used for crime scene documentation and police surveillance operations, including forensic imaging analysis. The course will include a study of camera design and operation, lens selection and functions, role of light and illumination technologies, digital image editing software, and a review of the chain of custody procedures in recording and archiving images for courtroom presentation.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 308L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 201   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 310 - Computer Security I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course focuses on security threats to an organization's data network such as hackers, intruders, industrial espionage and sabotage, fraud and theft. The components of computer security architecture are studied as well as the principles of security networking protocols, encryption, fault tolerance techniques, and file system protection. Additional topics covered include the protection of computer hardware and software.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Other:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 311 - Computer Security II
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is a continuation of CRJ 310, and includes an analysis of the security features of computer operating systems. The course will review the OSI model and describe how systems communicate with one another. Also included in the course is a detailed study of authentication technologies and how they are used to secure an organization's assets and electronic transactions.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Other:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 310   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 312 - Computer Security III
Credits:   3.00 hours
The course examines computer software threats which include the birth, life and termination of computer viruses, their modes of operation, detection techniques, virus signatures and virus removal methods as well as other "virus like" threats which are delivered by e-mail and internet/intranet packets.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 311   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 313 - Computer Security IV
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course focuses on the computer security audit and policy formulation process. Topics covered include e-mail, messaging, employee use of the internet and work group security issues. Other topics examined are the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act, the Communications Decency Act, and the Communications Privacy Act.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 312   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 314 - Security Law and Policy
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course introduces students to the study of security law and security policies. Topics include crimes and offenses encountered by security personnel, application of criminal, civil and administrative law in the security field, employment liability, workplace violence and legal issues in security services. The course will also discuss the security policy formulation process. Students will learn how to develop security policy by incorporating federal regulatory requirements and business demands. Other topics examined are the National Information Infrastructure Protection Act, the Communications Decency Act, and the Communications Privacy Act.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 100   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 321 - Access Control
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of firewall technologies, including packet filtering, proxying, network address translation, and virtual private networks. An analysis of firewall architectures such as screening routers, screened hosts, hosts, screened subnets, perimeter networks and internal firewalls. An examination of security threats on the internet, including service attacks, eavesdropping, worm programs and the like. A study of access control hardware devices such as voice signatures, fingerprints, facial geometry, hand geometry and retinal scanners-iris patterns for servers, workstations and mobile computers.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Other:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 322 - Intrusion Detection
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of the architecture, monitoring strategies and analysis engines of intrusion detection. An examination of host-based information sources. An analysis of information transformation processes for intrusion detection such as misuse and anomaly detection. A study of technical issues in intrusion detection such as scalability, interoperability, sensor control, reliability, integration and user interfaces. An examination of legal matters in intrusion detection such as the rules of evidence with regard to system logs and monitoring activities with regard to the right of privacy.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Other:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 115   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 400 - Visual Security Systems I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course offers a lecture and laboratory study of camera and lens type, monitors, video signaling systems, scanners, Pan and Tilts, video motion detectors, camera housings and enclosures, sequential switchers, video field recorders and their interactive role in the design of surveillance systems. Included are analysis of illumination technologies including; fluorescent, high and low pressure sodium, metal halide and infrared light sources. Also covered are examination of digital video multiplexers, digital multiplexing recorders, and digital video storage and transmission technologies.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 402 - Security System Design
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of the nature, characteristics, and extent of crimes against businesses. Analysis of the technical methods of detection and control of work place crimes. Planning an all- digital security function in a modern business environment. Recommending and establishing appropriate security systems policies and procedures as well as administering monitoring and evaluating systems outputs and performances.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice

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CRJ 404 - Cyber Law and Electronic Espionage
Credits:   3.00 hours
A study of the cases and statutes that focus on the legal issues of computer technology. An analysis of proprietary rights, including copyright, patent, trade secret and trademark. An examination of the Economic Espionage Act of 1996. An analysis of security risks in electronic commerce. A study of security controls and countermeasures to prevent electronic espionage.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 322   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 406 - Crime Analysis and Mapping
Credits:   4.00 hours
Students will learn how to analyze and apply sampled data distributions to crime patterns. Digital tools will allow students to identify trends and patterns in order to determine police service allocations based on collected data. The science and foundation principles of geographical information systems design and operation will be reviewed. Homeland Security implications as well as publicly available geospatial information will also be covered as specific applications for mapping techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 406L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 307   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 406L - Crime Analysis and Mapping (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Students will learn how to analysis and apply sampled data distributions to crime patterns. Digital tools will allow students to identify trends and patterns in order to determine police service allocations based on collected data The science and foundation principles of geographical information systems design and operation will be reviewed. Homeland Security implications as well as publicly available geospatial information will also be covered as specific applicaions for mapping techniques.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 406T

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CRJ 406T - Criminal Analysis and Mapping
Credits:   4.00 hours
Students will learn how to analysis and apply sampled data distributions to crime patterns. Digital tools will allow students to identify trends and patterns in order to determine police service allocations based on collected data The science and foundation principles of geographical information systems design and operation will be reviewed. Homeland Security implications as well as publicly available geospatial information will also be covered as specific applicaions for mapping techniques.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 406L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 307   Minimum Grade: D   or   CRJ 307T   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 407 - Crime Prevention Systems
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course will introduce the student to the theory and practice of crime prevention and examine topics such as the relationship of the built environment to crime, designing out crime, threat assessment, target hardening, and the like. The course will also focus on residential and commercial crime prevention systems. In addition, an analysis of false alarms from the perspective of the environment, end-user errors, and equipment malfunctions will be conducted. The course concludes with a review of police studies that have examined the nature and extent of the false alarm problem as well as the laws that regulate the use of crime prevention systems by public and private agencies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 407L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 406   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 407L - Crime Prevention Systems (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 407T

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CRJ 407T - Crime Prevention Systems
Credits:   4.00 hours
This course will introduce the student to the theory and practice of crime prevention and examine topics such as the relationship of the built environment to crime, designing out crime, threat assessment, target hardening, and the like. The course will also focus on residential and commercial crime prevention systems. In addition, an analysis of false alarms from the perspective of the environment, end-user errors, and equipment malfunctions will be conducted. The course concludes with a review of police studies that have examined the nature and extent of the false alarm problem as well as the laws that regulate the use of crime prevention systems by public and private agencies.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 407L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 406   Minimum Grade: D   or   CRJ 406T   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 410 - Senior Project
Credits:   3.00 hours
Independent study of a Security Systems or related area of interest to both the student and a faculty member who shall act as project Advisor. The project selected will utilize competencies acquired in previous Security Systems and related courses.
Lecture:   1.00 hour Lab:   6.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Criminal Justice: Law Enf Tech
Security Systems

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CRJ 420 - Physical Security I
Credits:   4.00 hours
A study of the theory and practice of managing the movement of people in organizational settings. This lecture course examines the operating principles and applications of access control readers, card encoding technologies, locking assemblies, and system functions such as fail-safe, fail-secure, access levels, time zones, limited and unlimited access privileges, and the like. Also, the course focuses on the role of alarm systems in an organization's overall protection plan, from the control of violence in the workplace to preventing theft of company property. Sensor technologies as well as controls and signaling systems are analyzed and evaluated with applications in the following areas: perimeter, interior, occupant, and object protection.
Lecture:   4.00 hours Lab:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 302   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 421 - Physical Security II
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of CRJ 420. Advanced topics include a study of camera and lens types, monitors, video signaling systems, scanners, pan and tilt positioning devices, video motion detectors, camera housings and enclosures, switchers, multiplexers, time-lapse VCRs, digital video recorders, and their interactive role in the design of CCTV systems. Analysis of illumination technologies, including fluorescent, high and low pressure sodium, metal halide, ultraviolet and infrared light sources. Other topics include the application philosophy as well as the hardware and software components of video surveillance computers, and the analysis of video field and frame compositions with reference to identification issues in criminal cases. An inquiry into the legal and ethical dimensions of surveillance, including Fourth Amendment guidelines, Plain View Doctrine cases, the Expectation of Privacy court cases and directives, and the Exclusionary Rule.
Lecture:   3.00 hours Other:   1.00 hour
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 420   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 430 - Forensic DNA Analysis
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will introduce the student to modern molecular biological techniques that are used in a crime laboratory. The student will be taught the theory of forensic DNA testing as well as gain practical forensic field experience. The course will cover background information on body fluid identification, DNA structure and function, analytical of DNA typing. The primary focus will be the molecular biological technique known as short tandem repeats (STR) testing. Other topics covered include sample handling, DNA databanking, results reporting, criminal cases, and case preparation and courtroom presentation.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 430L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 201   Minimum Grade: D

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CRJ 430L - Forensic DNA Analysis (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 430T

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CRJ 430T - Forensic DNA Analysis
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course will introduce the student to modern molecular biological techniques that are used in a crime laboratory. The student will be taught the theory of forensic DNA testing as well as gain practical forensic field experience. The course will cover background information on body fluid identification, DNA structure and function, analytical of DNA typing. The primary focus will be the molecular biological technique known as short tandem repeats (STR) testing. Other topics covered include sample handling, DNA databanking, results reporting, criminal cases, and case preparation and courtroom presentation.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Arts & Sciences
Department:   Criminal Justice
Co-Requisites:   CRJ 430L
Pre-requisites:   CRJ 201   Minimum Grade: D

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Dental Hygiene

DEN 015 - Skills Refresher Course
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to assist students in maintaining their clinical skills following a break in their clinical sequence. Demonstration of clinical competency prior to re-entering the clinical sequence is necessary to ensure proper patient treatment.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene

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DEN 102 - Dental Materials and Expanded Functions
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course is concerned with the study of dental materials that are employed in dentistry for the fabrication of dental appliances and tooth restorations. It will provide the student with a basic understanding of the various procedures, materials, and devices commonly used in dental practice. Emphasis will be place on the physical and chemical properties of dental materials and how these properties affect the care of manipulation of the materials. Basic laboratory techniques, as well as expanded functions, will be performed in the lab
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 102L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 102L - Dental Materials and Expanded Functions (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The study of dental materials and devices. Laboratory manipulation of materials commonly used in the dental office. Expanded functions legally allowed in New York State shall be taught to clinical or where indicated in course outline to laboratory proficiency.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 102T

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DEN 102T - Dental Materials and Expand Functions
Credits:   3.00 hours
The study of dental materials and devices. Laboratory manipulation of materials commonly used in the dental office. Expanded functions legally allowed in New York State shall be taught to clinical or where indicated in course outline to laboratory proficiency.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 102L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 105 - Dental and Oral Anatomy
Credits:   0.00 or 3.00 hours
The study of the anatomy of the oral, facial complex and the morphology of the dentitions. Emphasis is placed on technical dental terminology as well as occlusion. Prerequisite(s) required or Admission to the Dental Hygiene Program.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 105L
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 140   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 105L - Dental and Oral Anatomy (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
The study of the anatomy of the oral, facial complex and the morphology of the dentitions. Emphasis is placed on technical dental terminology as well as occlusion.
Lab:   3.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 105T

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DEN 105T - Dental and Oral Anatomy
Credits:   3.00 hours
The study of the anatomy of the oral, facial complex and the morphology of the dentitions. Emphasis is placed on technical dental terminology as well as occlusion.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 105L
Pre-requisites:   EGL 101   Minimum Grade: C   and   CHM 140   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   ( CHM 140T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 166T   Minimum Grade: C )  

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DEN 106 - Oral Radiology I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course acquaints the student with the nature of ionizing radiation, the history of x-rays and their production and properties. The theory and practice of exposing, processing, mounting and analyzing dental radiographs are covered as well as radiation dosage, radiation hazards, and protective devices for patient and operator. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anatomic landmarks and the differentiation of these from conditions which indicate abnormality or disease.
Lecture:   2.00 hours Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 106L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 106L - Oral Radiology I (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course acquaints the student with the nature of ionizing radiation, the history of x-rays and their production and properties. The theory and practice of exposing, processing, mounting and analyzing dental radiographs are covered as well as radiation dosage, radiation hazards, and protective devices for patient and operator. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anatomic landmarks and the differentiation of these from conditions which indicate abnormality or disease.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 106T

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DEN 106T - Oral Radiology I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This course acquaints the student with the nature of ionizing radiation, the history of x-rays and their production and properties. The theory and practice of exposing, processing, mounting and analyzing dental radiographs are covered as well as radiation dosage, radiation hazards, and protective devices for patient and operator. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anatomic landmarks and the differentiation of these from conditions which indicate abnormality or disease.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 106L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 108 - Oral Histology and Embryology
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course reviews basic histological tissues. Microscopic structures of the oral tissues are studied and include the hard palate, soft palate, tongue, lip, salivary glands and tonsils. Emphasis is on the development of the face, the oral cavity and, in specific, the tooth and its surrounding tissues.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 110 - Preventive Oral Health Concepts I
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is an introduction to the study of Dental Hygiene. It includes an overview of the dental hygiene profession to include current and future roles of the dental hygienist. Special emphasis is placed on the hygienist as periodontal co-therapist, the responsibility of the dental hygienist to the profession and the development and strengthening of values that pertain to the profession of dental hygiene. Other topics to be covered include: principles of instrument design and use; disease transmission control; etiology and role of dental biofilm and calculus; importance of medical histories; measuring and recording of vital signs; office emergencies and planning implications for the medically compromised patient.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 105 ,   DEN 105L ,   DEN 115
Pre-requisites:    

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DEN 115 - Clinical Dental Hygiene I
Credits:   3.00 hours
This is a clinical course in the practical application of dental hygiene techniques with supplemental discussions related to the clinical practice of the dental hygienist. Emphasis is placed on proper patient and operator positioning, use of dental equipment, maintenance of an aseptic environment, intra and extra oral exams, measuring and recording of vital signs, instrumentation principles and techniques, recognizing and removing hard and soft deposits. Polishing and sharpening of instruments along with techniques and theory are included.
Lab:   8.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 105 ,   DEN 105L ,   DEN 110
Pre-requisites:    

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DEN 120 - Preventive Oral Health Concepts II
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is a continuation of the study of Dental Hygiene This course includes a detailed study of such preventive dental hygiene techniques as fluorides, nutritional counseling, patient motivation and management, oral physiotherapy techniques. Also covered are discussions on dental hygiene care planning, dental biofilm, calculus, caries, dental products, desensitization, periodontal and restorative charting. A research paper on an aspect of preventive dentistry will be expected from each student.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 125
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 115   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 110   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 125 - Clinical Dental Hygiene II
Credits:   3.00 hours
A continuation of the practical applications of dental hygiene techniques with supplemental lectures and discussions related to the clinical practice of the dental hygienist.
Lab:   8.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 120
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 115   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 110   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 126 - Periodontology
Credits:   2.00 hours
A basic understanding of the principles and concepts associated with periodontology, including a detailed study of the periodontal tissues in both health and disease. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the dental hygienist as a periodontal co-therapist in the development of skills necessary to provide initial non-surgical and supportive periodontal therapy within the framework of a comprehensive dental hygiene care plan.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   DEN 105   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 105T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 110   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 115   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 220   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 220T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 201 - Pain Management
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to provide an in depth study of anesthesia and pain management as it is used in Dentistry. The mechanism of actions of anesthetic agents as well as other methods of pain control will be studied, demonstrated, and practiced.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 201L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 102   Minimum Grade: D   and   DEN 106   Minimum Grade: D   and   DEN 108   Minimum Grade: D   and   DEN 120   Minimum Grade: D   and   DEN 125   Minimum Grade: D   and   DEN 126   Minimum Grade: D

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DEN 201L - Pain Management (Lab)
Credits:   0.00 hours
This course is designed to provide an in depth study of anesthesia and pain management as it is used in Dentistry. The mechanism of actions of anesthetic agents as well as other methods of pain control will be studied, demonstrated, and practiced.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 201T

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DEN 201T - Pain Management
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to provide an in depth study of anesthesia and pain management as it is used in Dentistry. The mechanism of actions of anesthetic agents as well as other methods of pain control will be studied, demonstrated, and practiced.
Lecture:   1.00 hour
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Co-Requisites:   DEN 201L
Pre-requisites:   DEN 102   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 102T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 106   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 106T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 108   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 120   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 125   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 126   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 203 - Principles of Nutrition for Oral Health Professionals
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is designed to educate the student in basic nutrition principles in regard to carbohydrates, protein, fats, vitamins, and minerals as they relate to health and wellness, nutrition and disease, energy balance, eating disorders, nutrition labeling, and the oral manifestations of nutritional deficiency. Dietary analysis of a client's diet and review of pertinent nutrition literature is essential to the dental hygiene process of care and therefore, is an important component to the scope of this course's requirements.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   CHM 140   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 140T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 205 - Oral Pathology
Credits:   3.00 hours
The study of the fundamentals of microscopic and gross pathology. Discussion of general pathologic processes with emphasis on pathology of the oral, dental, and periodontal tissues and their etiology and prevention.
Lecture:   3.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 166T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 220   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 220T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 120   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 125   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 207 - Oral Radiology II
Credits:   1.00 hour
Laboratory activities and experiences are designed to provide students with further practice in developing skills with intra-oral radiographic techniques. In addition, students will learn supplemental techniques that are not limited to, but include occlusal, extra-oral, digital, panoramic and specialized patients. Interpretations of radiographs will be emphasized, with integration of the role radiographs play in the dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment planning.
Lab:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   DEN 106   Minimum Grade: C   or   DEN 106T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 212 - Pharmacology
Credits:   2.00 hours
The study of drug actions in the body with emphasis on those drugs used in dentistry. Legal implications, regulatory agencies, and principles of prescription writing will be explored.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   CHM 140   Minimum Grade: C   or   CHM 140T   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 166   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 166T   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 120   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 125   Minimum Grade: C   and   BIO 220   Minimum Grade: C   or   BIO 220T   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 221 - Community Oral Health I
Credits:   2.00 hours
This course is an introduction to the concepts and core principles of community oral health and provides the student with an orientation to the role of the dental hygienist as educator, resource person and consumer advocate in the field of dental public health. An introduction to epidemiology and research principles will promote a better understanding of scientific literature. In addition, the student will develop the skills necessary to assess various target populations and select educational strategies that will effectively provide culturally appropriate oral health education programs.
Lecture:   2.00 hours
College:   Health Sciences
Department:   Dental Hygiene
Restrictions:  
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Dental Hygiene - Evening Prog.
Dental Hygiene
Pre-requisites:   DEN 110   Minimum Grade: C   and   DEN 115   Minimum Grade: C

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DEN 222 - Community Oral Health II