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Farmingdale State College

School of Art and Sciences

STS 400W: Understanding Radiation

Fall 2015

Dr. Lou Reinisch

 Hybrid Capstone Course

Tuesdays 5:55 – 7:10 PM  220 Hale Hall

Textbook

None are required.  If you want additional information, I can suggest:

Faiz M. Khan, The Physics of Radiation Therapy, 3rd Ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003.

There are many books that you can use.  Khan is one with an appropriate level in content and math.  This is a copy on reserve in the library.

 Course Rationale

This course is intended for any student interested in radiation and radiation safety. The course objective is to provide individuals with the knowledge and procedures necessary to minimize exposures to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and to understand the physiologic and environmental effects of radiation. This course requires you to view twelve pre-recorded lectures and to write short summaries of each lecture. You will also research and write short papers on three different topics. As a capstone course, the class will operate as a business Think Tank. You will be required to apply for the Think Tank by submitting a résumé and a cover letter.

 

Course Description

Understanding Radiation:  First, we define radiation.  Then, we discuss the various types of radiation and explore the historical understanding of radiation.  We cover the biological effects of radiation and how it is measured.  Next, the course explores common examples of radiation, including low frequency electromagnetic radiation, radiation from nuclear power plants, radiation from cell phones and cell phone towers, and radiation used to treat cancer.  The role of radiation in the creation of zombies is also analyzed.  Students will gain proficiency in using internet sources to understand radiation and to sort the hype from the science. Students will be required to learn how to write a résumé and a cover letter and to conduct a mock job-interview. Students will also have to write position statements, carefully describing a danger versus benefit analysis for specific technologies. At the end of this course, students should be able to present themselves in a professional manner be able to argue such questions as why food should or should not be irradiated. Radiation

 
Student Learning Outcomes

A student who successfully completes this course will be able to:

  1. Describe what radiation is.
  2. Explain and classify the different types of radiation.
  3. Describe how the different types of radiation interact with living organisms.
  4. Research health benefits and risks and make an independent assessment of relative risk from specific types of radiation exposure.
  5. Explain some of the uses of radiation in medicine.
  6. Write and résumé and cover letter for a job.

 Grading Policy

Course grade:  The course grade will be generated according to the following weights:

         

Grading Scale
A 94 - 100%
A- 90 - 93%
B+ 87 -89%
B 84 - 86%
B- 80 - 83%
C+ 77 - 79%
C 70 - 76%
D 60 - 69%
F <59%

                                        

              Quizzes/Tests/Exams

Lesson Summaries 2% each
Résumé  10%
Cover letter 10%
Paper #1 15%
Paper #2 15%
Paper #3 26%

Course Policies: Plan on about 150 learning hours, on average to complete this course.  That is at least 8 hours a week of out-of-class learning for the 15 weeks of the fall semester. To keep you on-track, the deadlines are stiff.  Please note the deadlines given on the schedule on the last page.  Late work will not be accepted.  You can always submit work before the deadline if you run into time conflicts.  If you work ahead, you will have a buffer should an unexpected event occur.

 

Office, Phone and Email

            Office:   220 Hale Hall

         Phone:  (631) 420-2198

         Email:  lou.reinisch@farmingdale.edu

 Use your College E-Mail

Be sure to monitor your “farmingdale.edu” email account regularly.  Notices from the College, your Department, and your professor will be sent to that address ONLY. When contacting your professor by email, you must use your farmingdale.edu email address.  Student emails sent from private providers (e.g., yahoo, Gmail) cannot be accepted as authentic from the student.

Code of Conduct

All students must follow the Farmingdale State College Student Code of Conduct.  Please familiarize yourself with the Student Code of Conduct, which is posted at: http://www.farmingdale.edu/campus-life/pdf/studentcode.pdf.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is not tolerated by your Instructor and by the College.  As defined in the Farmingdale State College Student Code of Conduct, forms of academic dishonesty include:

  • Cheating: Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or study aids in any academic exercise.
  • Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
  • Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise.This includes words or ideas in either print or electronic format.

Copying and pasting from the Internet or paraphrasing a few words is not an acceptable practice in college. Not knowing the rules for plagiarism will not be an acceptable excuse. If you are unsure about the rules of plagiarism, you should go to the writing center or to the library. The minimum sanction for plagiarism is a zero on the particular assignment; repeated offenses carry an F for the class as the minimum penalty.  Plagiarism must be reported to the Dean of Students.

Career Center

The Career Center offers the following services Career Assessment:

  • Resume and Cover Letter Assistance
  • Networking Skills 
  • Interviewing Skills
  • Job Fairs and Graduate School Fairs
  • Weekly Job and Internship Postings
  • Workshops

You are encouraged to visit the Career Center located in Greenley Hall, on the lobby level in the Student Success Center. To make an appointment with a career counselor, call 631-420-2296 or email careercenter@farmingdale.edu.

Writing Center

The FSC Writing Center is located in the library on the second floor. The tutors are prepared to assist students with their papers and writing assignments in any discipline.  On-line assistance is also available. Contact:  writingcenter@farmingdale.edu  or 631-420-2082. This is a FREE service.

 Accommodation for Students with Disabilities

This course is open to all students who meet the academic requirements for participation. If you have a disability for which you are or may be requesting an accommodation, you are encouraged to contact both your instructor and the Disability Services Center (DSC) located in Roosevelt Hall 150/151; telephones: 631-420-2411; website: http://www.farmingdale.edu/campus-life/student-support-services/support-services-students-disabilities/  If you have a documented disability and wish to discuss appropriate accommodation, please discuss this matter with your instructor as soon as possible in the term.

 Religious Absences

If you are unable to attend class on certain days due to religious beliefs, your absence will be excused.  However, any assignment due on that date must be turned in by the due date.  You can turn work in early if you are unable to turn it in on the due date. 

 Assignments

There are no make-up assignments, quizzes or examinations. Late work and assignments will not be accepted.

Have paper and pencil in hand while viewing the 12 videos. Not only will you want to take notes, but you will also be asked to write things down during the videos. You are required to submit a one-to-two page summary of the lecture, in which you can quote liberally from the video. You should also include your thoughts and reactions to what you viewed. I am not requesting a critique of the lesson; however, I DO want you to document what you learned and why you think it is important or not. These summaries are due as noted on the schedule.

On the first day of class, we will discuss résumés and cover letters. As noted earlier in this document, you are required to write a cover letter applying for a position in the STS 400 W Think Tank and a résumé.

In addition, three essays are due. Each one can be on one of the four topics provided. Since the topics are broad, you will have to narrow them down to suit the parameters: five-ten pages per essay. Write the essays as if you were trying to explain the topic to a newspaper reporter. Use diagrams and images to clarify technical points. Much of your information for these papers should come from internet sources. However, be careful about what sources you use. As you will see in lecture one on the definition of radiation, the internet can be very distorted with its view on many of these topics. You can email me your completed paper as a MS Word document or a PDF file.

 You are strongly advised to have paper and pencil in hand while viewing the videos.   Not only will you want to take notes, but you will be asked to write things down during the videos.  After viewing each lecture, you are required to submit a one-page summary of each lecture.  There are 12 recorded lectures to view and summarize.   The one page is “within a factor of two.”  Anything from ½ page to 2 pages is okay.  Use the length of “one-page” as you feel appropriate.   Your one-page summary can quote liberally from the lesson.  You should also add your thoughts and impressions.  I am not requesting a critique of the lesson.  I do want you to document what you learned and why you think it is important or un-important.   These summaries are due as noted on the schedule. 

 On the first day of class we will discuss résumés and cover letters.  You will be required to write both a cover letter applying for a position in the STS 400 W Think Tank and submit a résumé. 

There are, in addition to the summaries, cover letter and résumé,  three papers due.  Each paper can be on one of the four suggested topics for that paper.  The topics can be very broad.  You should narrow the topics down to cover them at a reasonable level.  Each finished paper should be about 5 pages long (again, within a factor of two – anything for 2½ pages to 10 pages).  Write the paper as if you were trying to explain the topic to a newspaper reporter.  Use diagrams and images in your paper.  You can email me your completed paper as a MS Word document or a PDF file.   Much of your information for these papers can and should come from the internet.  However, be careful about what sources you use from the internet.  As you will see in lecture one on the definition of radiation, the internet can be very distorted with its view on many of these topics. 

Cover letter and résumé applying for a job at Think Tank.  Due 8 September 2015 5:55 PM 

Assignment #1 Due Tuesday 6 October 2015 5:55 PM on one of the following four topics:

                        • X-ray tubes

                        • Linear Accelerators (Linacs)

                        • PET Scanner

                        • Measuring and shielding for alpha, beta, gamma and neutron radiation

Assignment #2 Due Tuesday 10 November 2015 5:55 PM on one of the following four topics:

• X-ray imaging

                        • Ultra sound imaging

                        • Brachytherapy

                        • Comparison of CT and MRI

 

Assignment #3 Due Tuesday 8 December 2015 5:55PM on one of the following four topics:

• Low frequency electromagnetic radiation—health effects

                        • Radon

                        • Cell phone radiation – health effects

                        • Laser biomodulation

 

All your summaries and assignments should be submitted as a hard copy or via email to your instructor, Lou Reinisch.  Please use MS Word documents or PDF files to submit your work when submitting via email.

Suggested Study Schedule:  STS 400W  Fall 2015

(with absolute deadlines for assignments)

 

Week

Class Date

Tuesdays

Topics to be covered and Assignments

Due Dates
(due at 5:55PM)

1

Sept 1

Applying for a job

(Sept. 3 last day for schedule changes)

Résumé  Sept. 8

Letter     Sept. 8

2

Sept 8

Lecture 1:  What is Radiation?

1 Sum.   Sept. 8

3

Sept 15

Lecture 2:  Quantum Physics

2 Sum.   Sept. 15

4

Sept 22

Lecture 3:  Structure of Photon and Matter

3 Sum.   Sept. 22

5

Sept 29

Lecture 4:  Nuclear Transformations

4 Sum.   Sept. 29

6

Oct. 6

 

First Paper Due Tuesday 6 October:

            • X-ray tubes

            • Linear Accelerators (Linacs)

            • PET Scanner

            • Measuring and shielding for             alpha, beta, gamma and neutron

            radiation

 

Lecture 5: Production of X-rays

1 Paper  Oct. 6

5 Sum.   Oct. 6

7

Oct. 13

Lecture 6:  Nuclear reactors

6 Sum.  Oct 13

8

Oct. 20

Lecture 7:  Biological Effects of Ionizing
Radiation

7 Sum.  Oct 20

9

Oct. 27

Lecture 8:  Quality of x-ray beams

(Oct. 29 last day to withdraw)

No class on Election Day (Nov. 3)

8 Sum. Oct 27

10

Nov. 10

Second Paper Due Tuesday 10 November

            • X-ray imaging

            • Ultra sound imaging

            • Brachytherapy

            • Comparison of CT and MRI

 

Lecture 9:  Measurement of Absorbed Dose

2 Paper Nov. 10

9 Sum. Nov. 10

11

Nov. 17

Lecture 10:  Optical Fluorescence Background in Optical Fiber Scintillator Dosimeters

10 sum. Nov. 17

12

Nov. 24

Lecture 11:  Dose Distribution and scatter analysis

11 sum. Nov. 24

13

Dec. 1

Lecture 12:  Laser physics, optics in medicine and laser safety

12 sum. Dec. 1

14

Dec. 8

Third Paper Due Tuesday 8 December

            • Low frequency electromagnetic                 radiation—health effects

            • Radon

            • Cell phone radiation – health                effects

            • Laser biomodulation

3 Paper Dec. 8

 

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