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Fall 2017 Lecture Series

The ILR Lecture Series presents sixteen lectures per year presented by experts with various backgrounds. Each member may choose up to five lectures per semester.  All lectures are held on the campus of Farmingdale State College on Friday afternoons with light refreshments following.  Registration is required.

 

MIKHAIL BARYSHNIKOV: Portrait of an Artist

Lecturer: Marilyn Carminio                        

Friday, Sept.15      

Whitman Hall, 150 

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Fee: $5

Mikhail Baryshnikov is unquestionably the greatest male classical dancer of the late 20th century. Dazzling audiences with his athleticism and grace, he reached celebrity status attracting new audiences to the world of dance. "Metamorphosis" is a word often used to describe his career, which goes far beyond the dance world. A prolific and diverse artist, he has performed on stage, in film, theater, and television.

This biography takes us from his boyhood in Soviet occupied Latvia to his life in the west and will chart his course to the present day. In addition to many video clips, we will view "The Sinatra Suite" with music by Frank Sinatra and choreography by Twyla Tharp.

Whether you have never seen a ballet, are an avid balletomane, or somewhere in between, the joy of watching Baryshnikov in his many incarnations is something you will not soon forget. Maximum: 90.

KOREAN HISTORY AND CULTURE

Lecturer:   Yon Han                              

Friday, Sept. 29       

Whitman   Hall, 150

12:45 p.m. – 2:15   p.m.

Fee: $5

Yon Han is a project coordinator of the Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project, an organization dedicated to promoting Korea's unique history and culture since 2005. They have produced two short documentary films about Korea's past and present achievements. The films aim to introduce Korea through showing her past and present.  While the ancient artifacts from the first film will demonstrate the incredible devotion and perseverance of the artisans at the time, the second film will illustrate how such characteristics have transformed the country into the 7th largest export country in the World. At the end of the program, there will be traditional Korean refreshments. Maximum: 90.

NAME THAT OPERA! Opera in Popular Culture and Media

Lecturer: Tanisha Mitchell             

Friday, Oct. 6                               

Whitman Hall, 150 

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Fee: $5

From The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air to the WWE, explore opera in unexpected ways. In this opera talk we will discuss how opera is used in popular culture, specifically movies and commercials. We will see opera clips from featured movies including, The Shawshank Redemption, Carmen Jones, Fatal Attraction, and then the actual opera clip from an opera production. Ms. Mitchell brings a new spin on opera lectures to teach and inspire all who attend. Maximum: 90.

THE HUMOR OF JUDGE JUDY

Lecturer:   Marjorie Wolfe

Friday, Oct. 13                

Whitman   Hall, 150

12:45 p.m. – 2:15   p.m.

Fee: $5

Having made a name for herself as a tough, but fair judge in New York's Family Court, Judge Judy Sheindlin retired from the bench in 1996 to bring her trademark wit and wisdom to the widely successful series that takes viewers inside a television courtroom where justice is dispensed at lightning speed. Take a look behind the scenes at this no-nonsense, pithy saying, quick ruling judge. Join Marjorie Wolfe for her humorous and entertaining talk about one of TV's most famous judges.   Maximum: 90.

THE HOLLYWOOD BLOCKBUSTER: How Steven Spielberg and George Lucas Changed the Movies

Lecturer: Brian Rose                                   

Friday, Oct. 27             

Whitman Hall, 150              

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Fee: $5

Hollywood is an industry that has always depended on blockbusters, beginning with The Birth of a Nation and continuing with epics like Gone with the Wind, The Ten Commandments, and The Sound of Music. But beginning in 1974, two young filmmakers, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, would together change the way the movie industry made movies. Spielberg's Jaws and Lucas' Star Wars (neither of which was predicted to be a hit) helped launch the careers of the most influential directors of our time. Whether they were making films together (like Indiana Jones) or separately (E.T., Jurassic Park, The Empire Strikes Back), they introduced the age of the "modern blockbuster," which featured elaborate special effects and thrilling spectacles. This presentation will look at their four decades of filmmaking and discuss how they changed the movies. Maximum: 90.

UNDISCLOSED FILES OF THE POLICE: Cases from the Archives of the NYPD

Lecturer: Bernard Whalen 

 Friday, Nov. 3

Whitman Hall, 150               

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Fee: $5

The crimes covered in this lecture are all true and took place in New York City during a span of the past two hundred years. Bernard Whalen is a lieutenant in the NYPD and has been with the Department for over thirty-six years. The crimes he will tell about are those that he considers the most interesting, most notorious, most unbelievable, or most disturbing in the last two centuries. As criminals got more sophisticated, so did the police, starting with the Bertillon method in 1896 all the way to DNA today. But in the end, arrests and convictions were more often than not brought about by good detectives using their wits, and the investigative tools at their disposal.

Bernard Whalen will also discuss several bombings that occurred in New York City over the past 100 years. While New Yorkers tend to think of terrorism in the terms of the present day, in reality the citizens of New York City have always been under constant threat and just don't realize it. The lecture will shed a whole new light on the world today, by looking back at the events of yesteryear. Maximum: 90.

OVER   THERE – George M. Cohan

Lecturer: Barry Rivadue

Friday, Nov. 10                                   

Whitman   Hall, 150

12:45 p.m. – 2:15   p.m.

Fee: $5

Experience our local history during the First World War, and also learn about the legendary Kings Point resident, George M. Cohan, and the creation of the classic "Over There" that he composed.  Cohan was also an actor, singer, dancer, producer and playwright, whose life was depicted in the1942 James Cagney musical, Yankee Doodle Dandy. How Long Island responded to the war effort is also examined, with "liberty gardens", training camps, and pioneering air fields serving the cause. Cohan's jaunty anthem became the most popular song of its type during that time, and Cohan's other music also lives on.

Barry Rivadue is a longtime member of the North Shore Historical Museum in Glen Cove, and lectures on topics that blend Long Island history with popular culture. Maximum: 90.

HOW THE JFK ASSASSINATION CHANGED THE CONSTITUTION

Lecturer: James Coll                                   

Friday, Nov. 17                                 

Whitman Hall, 150 

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Fee: $5

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy was a defining moment in American history.  Yet the story of how JFK's untimely death led to a change in the U.S. Constitution is less well known.  In this discussion we will examine constitutional provisions dealing with a premature vacancy in the presidency and legal changes over time in the order of presidential succession. Maximum: 90.

For more information or to receive a brochure, contact ILR@farmingdale.edu or call 631.420.2160.

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